Book/Printed Material Image 3 of The black laws! : speech of Hon. B.W. Arnett of Greene County, and Hon. J.A. Brown of Cuyahoga County, in the Ohio House of Representatives, March 10, 1886.

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THE BLACK LAWS!
SIVEIEOIEI OIF 1
OK ORKKNK COUNTY,
In the Ohio House of Representatives, Rareh 10, 1886.
Mr. Speaker We have before us to
day a subject that is of great interest to
the people of the commonwealth of Ohio;
one of those questions that called for the
efforts of great men in the past, which
have been the cause of the organization
of the party, and have been the life of
the same. I would apologize to this House
and to my constituents for the interest I am
taking in this work if it were not the con
tinuation of the work of the moral heroes
of this country, It is the carrying forward
of the work begun by J. G Birney, who,
in 1840, had only 7,059 persons on his side.
In 1844 h e h a d 62,300; and the columns
increased, so that in 1848 there were 291,-
263 men in the army of the Free Soil
Party, with Martin Van Buren as leader.
In 1852 J. P. Hale led the host, with
156,149 bearing his banner in every con
quest and victory. In 1856, J. C. Fremont,
the “Pathfinder,” marched to the Bell of
Liberty, with 1.341,266 true and tried men.
In i860, the great emancipator, Abraham
Lincoln, led 1,866,352. In 1864, when the
watchword of the nation, “Freedom and
the Union,” had an army of 2,216,067, the
great emancipator performed his work,
broke the chain from the limbs of four
millions of human beings, and bade them
stand up in the dignity of freedom and
defend the Constitution and the Union.
The next work was that of January 13th,
1865. The Thirteenth Amendment of the
Constitution of the United States was
passed, which forever prohibits slavery and
involuntary servitude in this land. I was
present in the Hall of Congress when the
great act was performed. It was an occa
sion to be remembered by all. The hour
had arrived for the calling up of that meas
ure. J. M. Ashley, of Ohio, had charge of
the measure. The discussion was finished,
the vote taken, the result announced. Then
the multitude was wild with joy. Men ran,
jumped, hugged, cried and hallooed; hats
were thrown in the air, handkerchiefs were
waved by the ladies, old men were young
—dignity in men and women surrendered
to their joy. The halls were filled with the
shouts and cheers of the hour. At the
passage of the bill a messenger ran to the
front of the Capitol, where a cannon was
waiting to announce the news of great joy.
In a moment the sound of the cannon was
heard, and a battery at the corner of Mt.
Vernon avenue and Fourteenth street
joined in the joy, and the thunder was
sounded along the sky. The death knell
of slavery was sounded by the brazen
notes of war; the bells of the city tolled
forth tunes and chimed the notes of free
dom, while the hills resounded with the
echoes of the shouts of liberty. It was a
grand day for the sons of Liberty and the
daughters of Oppression. The scene in
the city was indescribable. In the hotels
the waiter and the guest congratulated
each other. Dinner was interrupted with
songs, shouts and cheers. They ate a
while, then sang a while, shouted a while,
and cheered a while. So, this event was one
of the grandest ever known in the history of
the city and among the party. It is so far-
reaching in its results, so beneficent in its
effects—the lifting of the burden from the
millions, the closing of the gateway of
Oppression, and the opening of the ave
nues of Universal Freedom for the hun
dred generations—and, as the years roll

About this Item

Title
The black laws! : speech of Hon. B.W. Arnett of Greene County, and Hon. J.A. Brown of Cuyahoga County, in the Ohio House of Representatives, March 10, 1886.
Summary
Arnett examines the civil rights of African Americans in Ohio, Jim Crow laws and segregation, and African American education in Ohio schools, and he pleads for repeal of Ohio's segregation laws, the text of which are reproduced here. Arnett, a prominent AME cleric, represented Greene County in the Ohio State Legislature from 1885-1887.
Contributor Names
Arnett, Benjamin William, 1838-1906.
Brown, J. A. (Jere A.)
Ohio. General Assembly. House of Representatives.
Daniel Murray Pamphlet Collection (Library of Congress)
Created / Published
Columbus, Ohio : Ohio State Journal, 1886.
Subject Headings
-  African Americans--Legal status, laws, etc.--Ohio--History
-  Segregation--Law and legislation--Ohio
-  African Americans--Civil rights
Genre
Addresses--Ohio--Columbus--1886
Notes
-  Cover title.
-  "Black laws of Ohio since 1802": p. [29]-40.
-  Also available in digital form on the Library of Congress Web site.
-  LC copy imperfect: cover wanting. Title transcription and imprint from OCLC (#4896267).
Medium
40 p., [2] leaves of plates : ports. ; 21 cm.
Call Number/Physical Location
E449 .D16 vol. D, no. 6
Library of Congress Control Number
91898104
Online Format
image
online text
pdf
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/91898104
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record
IIIF Presentation Manifest
Manifest (JSON/LD)

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The contents of the Library of Congress African American Perspectives collection have no known copyright restrictions and are free to use and reuse.

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Credit Line: Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Arnett, Benjamin William, J. A Brown, Ohio. General Assembly. House Of Representatives, and Daniel Murray Pamphlet Collection. The black laws!: speech of Hon. B.W. Arnett of Greene County, and Hon. J.A. Brown of Cuyahoga County, in the Ohio House of Representatives. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio State Journal, 1886. Pdf. https://www.loc.gov/item/91898104/.

APA citation style:

Arnett, B. W., Brown, J. A., Ohio. General Assembly. House Of Representatives & Daniel Murray Pamphlet Collection. (1886) The black laws!: speech of Hon. B.W. Arnett of Greene County, and Hon. J.A. Brown of Cuyahoga County, in the Ohio House of Representatives. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio State Journal. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/91898104/.

MLA citation style:

Arnett, Benjamin William, et al. The black laws!: speech of Hon. B.W. Arnett of Greene County, and Hon. J.A. Brown of Cuyahoga County, in the Ohio House of Representatives. Columbus, Ohio: Ohio State Journal, 1886. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/91898104/>.

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