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Jurisdictions Surveyed: Angola | Argentina | Botswana | Bulgaria | Cambodia | China | Democratic Republic of the Congo | Côte d’Ivoire | Egypt | Gabon | Georgia | Ghana | Greenland | Guyana | India | Indonesia | Kazakhstan | Liberia | Nepal | Pakistan | Russia | Thailand | Turkey | Vietnam
Appendix: Mexico | Saudi Arabia | United Arab Emirates | United Kingdom

Côte d’Ivoire

Bushmeat is a significant source of protein in many tropical African countries, including Côte d’Ivoire, where the trade of bushmeat is widespread.[1] Although quantitative data on the exploitation of bushmeat is scarce and often outdated, a 1999 study estimated that approximately 120,000 tons of wild game were consumed annually, compared with 45,000 tons of domestic meat.[2] This represented the equivalent of 1.7% of the country’s gross domestic product.[3]

In April 2014, the government of Cote d’Ivoire banned the sale and consumption of bushmeat in an effort to prevent the spread of the Ebola virus.[4] However, despite possible punishments of up to five years in jail, the sale of bushmeat continued to flourish on the black market.[5] The government lifted the ban on bushmeat by 2016.[6]

As part of its effort to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus, the government of Côte d’Ivoire again banned the consumption of all bushmeat, starting on March 17, 2020.[7] As was the case in 2014-2016, the government may have difficulty enforcing this prohibition, as this measure is not well accepted by the Ivorian population, for whom the consumption of bushmeat is a strong and long-standing tradition.[8]

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Prepared by Nicolas Boring
Foreign Law Specialist
August 2020


[1] S. Gondelé Bi et al., Bushmeat Hunting Around a Remnant Coastal Rainforest in Côte d’Ivoire, 51(3) Oryx 418-427 (July 2017),  https://perma.cc/8TBW-MTVA

[2] Id. at 419.

[3] Id.

[4] Charles Bouessel, En Côte d’Ivoire, « on mange de la viande de brousse la peur au ventre », Jeune Afrique (Nov. 5, 2015), https://perma.cc/KW9S-MUM9.

[5] Id.

[6] Rémi Carlier, La viande de brousse, de retour dans les assiettes ivoiriennes, Le Monde (Oct. 7, 2016), https://perma.cc/PV7R-ZPJM.

[7] Yassin Ciyow, Covid-19: la viande de brousse, toujours consommée en Côte d’Ivoire, malgré l’interdiction, Le Monde (Mar. 24, 2020), https://perma.cc/AJ94-7V9V.

[8] Id.

Last Updated: 12/31/2020