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Russian Federation: Supreme Court Rejects Mother’s Petition to Change Children’s Names without Father’s Consent

(Apr. 19, 2021) On January 28, 2021, the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation issued a ruling that clarified the circumstances in which a divorced parent may change a child’s first name, patronymic name, and last name without the consent of the other parent. This decision confirmed the equal rights of the parents regardless of […]

Turkey: Constitutional Court Censures Lower Court for Not Enforcing Constitutional Court Judgment

(Apr. 9, 2021) On January 21, 2020, the Grand Chamber of the Constitutional Court of Turkey issued its decision in the Kadri Enis Berberoglu (3) case, censuring the Istanbul 14. Criminal Court for refusing to comply with the Constitutional Court’s prior decision in Kadri Enis Berberoglu (2). The cases arose from complaints made by Kadri […]

Norway: Supreme Court Rules Organization May Bring Claim Questioning Constitutionality of Parliamentary Decision

(Mar. 30, 2021) On March 1, 2021, the Norwegian Supreme Court, sitting in banc, declared that the organization “Nei til EU” (No to the EU) may bring a claim in court that a parliamentary vote decided by simple majority violated a Norwegian constitutional provision requiring certain matters be decided by a supermajority. (Norwegian Supreme Court, […]

England: Permission to Appeal Granted in Case Requiring Court Order for Puberty-Blocking Treatment for Transgender Teenagers

(Mar. 19, 2021) On January 18, 2021, the High Court in England granted the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust permission to appeal a High Court ruling that children under 16 cannot give informed consent to receive puberty-blocking treatments, which effectively stopped both treatment and referrals for children under the age of 16 to the trust’s […]

United Kingdom: Uber Drivers Are Workers Entitled to Employment Law Protections, Supreme Court Rules

(Mar. 17, 2021) The Supreme Court, the United Kingdom’s highest court, upheld on February 19, 2021, a ruling from the Court of Appeal that drivers who brought an employment law claim against Uber in 2016 were not independent contractors and were entitled to the protections afforded workers under U.K. employment law. The high court rejected […]

Brazil: Federal Supreme Court Decides Right to Be Forgotten Is Not Supported by Constitution

(Mar. 15, 2021) On February 11, 2021, the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court (Supremo Tribunal Federal, STF) dismissed the extraordinary appeal by family members of the victim of a notorious 1958 murder who had sought redress for the reconstruction of the case on a 2004 TV show without their permission. In a ruling of “general repercussion”—one […]

England: Restrictions on Privacy in Parole Hearings Loosened

(Mar. 15, 2021) On February 8, 2021, England’s government announced its intention to amend rule 15 of the Parole Board Rules 2019, which provide that, with limited exceptions, all parole hearings should be held in private, to provide transparency and confidence in the parole system. Changes to the rules will end what is effectively a […]

Pakistan: Supreme Court Bars Use of Death Penalty for Inmates with Serious Mental Illness

(Mar. 3, 2021) On February 10, 2021, a five-member bench of the Supreme Court of Pakistan in a landmark judgment barred the use of the death penalty for inmates with serious mental illness or disorders who are “unable to comprehend the rationale behind their execution.” Background The apex court was hearing three appeals from prisoners […]

Italy: Supreme Court Rules on Relevance of Public Policy in Arbitration

(Feb. 19, 2021) On January 18, 2021, the Italian Supreme Court issued Decision No. 1788 concerning the grounds for invalidating a domestic arbitral award based on public policy considerations. Background of the Case A petitioner requested the Italian Supreme Court to overturn a decision by the Appellate Court of Ancona, which had rejected his petition […]

Russian Federation: Supreme Court Recognizes Birthdays and Bad Weather as Legitimate Reasons for Not Working

(Feb. 17, 2021) The Supreme Court of the Russian Federation recently reviewed several labor law cases previously resolved by lower courts and concluded that any evidence admitted under the Civil Procedural Code can be used by employees to prove the validity of their absence from work. In one case, a fellow at a research institute […]