U.S. Citizen Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program

  • Hosting Service Unit: All Library of Congress
  • Program Contact: juniorfellows@loc.gov
  • Interests/Areas of Study: STEM; Collections Conservation and Preservation; Law; Business; Humanities, Art and Culture; Library Information Science; Communications; Chemistry and Science; Congressional Relations; Geography and Maps; Government and Business Administration; Information Technology; Legislative Information; Policy Analysis; Public Relations; Cataloguing; Copyright; Digital Stewardship; Education; Finance; Outreach; Project & Project Management; Research; Web Services
  • Citizenship: U.S. Citizen
  • Application Period: Annually
  • Application Notes: See below for: A. General FAQ on all the programs available at the Library; B. Specific FAQ on the Junior Fellows Program; C. Specific information on the program including project descriptions D. Apply for the 2021 internship at USAjobs.gov https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/583762600.
  • Compensation: Compensation: $14.99/hour; $599.60/week; $5996.00 total for 10 weeks
  • Academic Credit: The Library does not provide academic credit, but you may arrange with your school in advance to receive credit.
  • Available Benefits: With Benefits
  • Program Duration: Short-term. May 24, 2021 – July 30, 2021
  • Qualifications: Currently Enrolled Students (Undergraduate, Graduate) or have graduated in the months of December 2020 - June 2021
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge are usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, reference calls, and an interview with a selection official.  The program was converted to a virtual program in 2020 and will be conducted again online in 2021.

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and to promote awareness and appreciation of the Library's services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments.

The Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program has been a signature program of the Library of Congress since 1991. It is made possible by a generous gift from the late James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and from the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund.

The Junior Fellows Program offers a paid ten week internship for undergraduate and graduate students working with Library of Congress collections. The fellows explore digital initiatives and inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve and research a backlog of special, legal or copyright collections in many different formats.

 

The application period for the 2021 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program is currently planned for November 4, 2020 through November 30, 2020 on USAJOBS.gov at https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/583762600 
Note:  Incomplete application packages will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. Letters of recommendation are not required for this application. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Projects for 2021

 

Project Descriptions

Junior Fellows 2021 Projects

  • #01 – Legal Reports Archive (Law Library Digital Resources Division)

    Short Description: The Law Library is developing an internal content management system (CMS) using Confluence (internal online software collaboration software) that will aid Law Library staff to store and access private legal reports. The Junior Fellow will be largely responsible for adding reports to Confluence and developing the CMS.

    Full Description: In late 2019, the Law Library began a multi-year effort to inventory, archive, and share many legal reports (both paper and born- digital) with researchers and other members of the public. Since the initial batch of digitized reports was published in March 2020, the Library implemented a plan to release approximately 250 digitized paper and born-digital reports per quarter over the next few years. While all reports are typescript, the optical character recognition systems can fail to recognize the characters of carbon copied documents printed on onionskin paper from the 1960s – 1980s. For this reason, we are pursuing a crowdsourcing project with By the People that will coincide with this Junior Fellowship experience. The Law Library is developing an internal content management system (CMS) using Confluence (internal online software collaboration software) that will aid Law Library staff to store and access private legal reports. The Junior Fellow will be largely responsible for adding reports to Confluence and developing the CMS.

    The work of the Junior Fellow will assist the Law Library to prepare and make these legal reports available through the Library’s Digital Collections website for public reports or private reports.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills: Familiarity with Microsoft Excel, Adobe Acrobat, and wikis (or other web-based collaborative tools).

    Preferred Skills: Interest in law and librarianship, history, and/or foreign, comparative and international law.

  • #02 – Sustainability of Digital Formats Research (Digital Collections Management & Services)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow working in the Sustainability of Digital Formats assists in updating broken URL links across the site to keep essential format information current, relevant and responsive to evolving community needs. The Junior Fellow may conduct original research into priority formats to be added to the Formats site as identified by service units.

    Full description: The Sustainability of Digital Formats is the world’s leading resource for information and analysis on 500+ digital file formats across a wide range of content categories in order to evaluate their ability to preserve information according to a defined list of sustainability factors. As a cornerstone of the Library’s digital preservation efforts, the Formats site serves to provide technical information to facilitate strategic planning and actions regarding digital formats at The Library of Congress including: updating broken URL links across the site; helping with original research into priority formats; helping keep essential format information current, relevant and responsive to evolving community needs; supporting data driven and digitally enabled content that supports the Library’s mission.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills: Strong attention to detail; Interest in technical file format documentation and specifications; excellent research skills; ability to understand and parse detailed technical information.

    Preferred Skills: Experience with XML and HTML; experience with Dreamweaver; familiarity with file format research projects.

  • #03 – LC Rights-Restricted Digital Collection (Digital Collections Management & Services)

    Short Description: This project is both collections-oriented and services-oriented as the Junior Fellow ensures the accurate description of digital collections in Stacks for staff and patrons. The Junior Fellow will help to enhance discoverability and accessibility of the digital content in Stacks, the Library’s new platform for accessing rights-restricted content.

    Full Description: The Digital Collections Management and Services Division is custodial for all General and International Collections Directorate digital content. Stacks, the Library’s new platform for accessing rights-restricted content, has allowed Library staff to provide secure onsite access to a variety of digital content, including tens of thousands of ePrint newspapers, eJournals, and eBooks covering a wide variety of subject areas, recommending divisions, and languages. The Junior Fellow will conduct a systematic review of the content currently in Stacks to determine the accuracy of bibliographic descriptions.

    The Junior Fellow ensures that DCMS continues to provide Library staff and patrons with accurate information about the Library’s general and international digital collections by: reviewing and improving the bibliographic description of the titles in Stacks; and noting any title/metadata mismatches or missing/incorrect bibliographic information. This project supports the Library to better meet its mission of engaging, inspiring, and informing Congress and the American people with a universal and enduring source of knowledge and creativity.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills:  Ability to plan, organize, and execute work with specified deadlines; ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing; ability to use computerized search tools, databases, and functions; ability to use information systems.

    Preferred Skills: Knowledge of MARC fields; Knowledge of UNIX commands; knowledge of digital content lifecycle.

  • #04 – Swinging Cords and Literature Map (Hispanic Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist to create the “Swinging Cords and Literature Map” a digital storytelling project, using the ArcGIS Story Maps platform, with the Literatura de Cordel (Brazilian chapbooks) collection. The Story Map will include resources in multiple formats such as texts, images, maps, and manuscripts to expand community engagement with the Hispanic Division and the Brazilian popular literature.

    Full Description: Hispanic Division curates and produces two audio resources: an archive of Caribbean, Latin American, Iberian and Hispanic or Portuguese heritage authors reading from their works; and podcast featuring collections and services for people interested in the Caribbean, Latin America, Iberia and Hispanic or Lusophone Studies.

    The Junior Fellow will assist to create the “Swinging Cords and Literature Map” which supports the Hispanic Division work to digitally curate the Brazilian chapbooks collection, facilitating discoverability, and enhancing the way we connect patrons to the wealth of resources and opportunities available in Luso-Hispanic collections at the Library of Congress. This project will help promote and highlight the Brazilian chapbooks collection for researchers and the public. This Story Map publication is vital to the Library's efforts to engage users in an online environment with digital collections and supporting the goals of expanding access, enhancing services, and optimizing resources.

    Public engagement with these resources can take several forms including but not limited to: coordinated crowdsourcing initiatives for Mayan and Mapuche metadata; collaborative digital humanities project development, assigning and collecting classroom-generated transcriptions, biographies, and metadata; podcast planning, production, and outreach. Each of these options enables the Hispanic Division to engage learners in designing online experiences that expand the reach of our services to communities less-commonly served onsite at the Library of Congress. In consultation with the mentor, successful interns will design and/or implement projects that expand the reach of our audio resources.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills: Knowledge or familiarity with one or more Caribbean or Latin American languages (reading required, writing and speaking preferred); experience with metadata and transcription; experience or willingness to learn skills and procedures applicable to audio production and promotion; experience or willingness to develop a proposal and implement project; ability to communicate effectively in writing and methods other than in writing; ability to work collaboratively; demonstrated independence and self-motivation.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of Mayan languages and/or Mapuche; knowledge the principles, concepts, and techniques of audio archives; knowledge of principles, concepts, and techniques of podcast development; experience with Caribbean and Latin American studies; ability to work effectively with diverse populations.

  • #05 – BEOnline Business Website Collection Review (Science, Technology & Business)

    Short description: BEOnline+ is an early example of curating digital content as part of the Business Reference Services. The Junior Fellow will be responsible for identifying outdated websites and broken links; recommending and categorizing additional online resources for inclusion; determining potential gap areas in the collection; and documenting workflows to inform a future maintenance schedule of this database to update and refresh this useful collection.

    Full description: BEOnline+ is a dynamic database of over 1,200 selected websites on all aspects of business and economics. This popular feature from the Business Reference Section began in 1996 as an experimental project to organize online resources related to entrepreneurship and small business. BEOnline+ resources are maintained in an in-house database from which subject guides are generated. While BEOnline+ has been updated periodically, it is in need of a focused review. The Junior Fellow will be responsible for identifying outdated websites and broken links, recommending and categorizing additional online resources for inclusion, and determining potential gap areas in the collection. The experience will also be used to document workflows to inform a future maintenance schedule of this database. BEOnline+ is an early example of curating digital content as part of the Business Reference Services, and the Junior Fellow will help update and refresh this useful collection.

    BEOnline+ project is a large undertaking that meets the Science, Technology and Business Division’s priority of reviewing division websites; assessing the websites in this collection; improving our digital content and highlighting the division’s expertise of online business information. This project specifically aligns with the Library’s goal of advancing the practice of librarianship by making the collection and reference information. The Junior Fellow assists in curating a database where researchers can access a dynamic guide to online information on a wide range of business topics from anywhere in the world.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to work efficiently with others; experience using Microsoft Office software (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint); ability to evaluate information for appropriateness and credibility.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to communicate effectively in writing, knowledge of website management, familiarity with business and management topics.

  • #06 – Arithmetic, Numeracy, Literacy and Imagination (Science, Technology & Business)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will produce a Research Guide that will serve to assist researchers who wish to examine materials on these topics: arithmetic, numeracy, literacy and imagination.

    Full description: Although the Library has an extensive collection of early arithmetic texts dating from the 1700's through the early 20th century, the connection of this material to the growth of US businesses during this period is not readily discernable. For this project, which is service oriented, the Junior Fellow will examine the Library's digital collections, including our electronic resources and other digitized or scanned print materials to identify relevant materials and prepare short annotations that can be used in a web guide relating to this topic. In addition to contributing to a guide on this topic, the Junior Fellow will prepare up to three blog posts and potentially present a lightning talk (via a virtual venue) on the topic.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Demonstrated ability to work in the Microsoft Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) and create infographics; demonstrated communication skills both oral and written. Knowledge of arithmetic, mathematics, issues in education, business models; ability to meet deadlines.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Reading knowledge languages other than English sufficient to read technical literature; Knowledge of the history of education to include current issues in education.

  • #07 – The Rise of American Industrialists (Science, Technology & Business)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will assist the Business Section’s ability to responds to frequent questions on the rise of American industrialists and "Big Business" by: developing a resource that documents materials in LC collections and contributing to a LibGuide (online research guide) that will help reference staff to more easily respond to these requests.

    Full Description: The Business section has extensive collections regarding American Industrialists and associated themes that include: labor conditions, unions, philanthropy, standards of living and industrial innovation. This internship fills a need to make current research and reference materials readily available in these areas. This project meets the needs of our division to respond to frequent requests from a range of K-12, college students, and independent researchers.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing; analyze materials; plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; use computerized search tools and databases, work independently with limited supervision. A love of history would be valuable.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Prior experience with LibGuides (online research guide) would be helpful, but not required.

  • #08 – Latin American Food Studies (Science, Technology & Business)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will create research resources that focus on an aspect of the broad area of food studies related to Latin America. The Junior Fellow will work with items in the collections, along with freely available online content, to develop material to be used for collection development and educational outreach.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will create research resources that focus on an aspect of the broad area of food studies related to Latin America. Food studies is a wide subject area that can include an exploration and analysis of food systems (production, processing, distribution and consumption of food) including: food history, foodways and local, regional and global food cultures. This project combines Library collections, services and materials related to a wide range of aspects of this subject area.

    The Junior Fellow will explore the collections; discover/identify relevant resources; available online content and develop user-centered content to be used for collection development and educational outreach. The Junior Fellow will be responsible to make connections between materials related to a specific food or ingredient, food system, or culture related to Latin American studies. The Project Mentor will assist the Junior Fellow explore specific areas of interest and to narrow the topic that furthers the needs of the division including: collection development activities and content for its Food and Foodways web archive collection and bridge topics related to Latin American food studies for the general collections. The project will assist with ST&B outreach activities in alignment with the Library’s strategic plan to expand access to the collection by increasing discoverability and availability.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Academic study of and/or interest in Latin American culture and culinary practices, food systems, food history, and agriculture; online research and evaluation skills; familiarity working with spreadsheets; and the ability to communicate with a variety of audiences in writing.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Spanish language skills are preferred, but not required.

  • #09 – The AAPB Online Exhibit Curation Project (National Audio-Visual Conservation Center)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will curate a section of an upcoming exhibit on the PBS NewsHour Collection of more than 14,000 programs from 1975 to 2019 and create a new special collection using other AAPB materials. The exhibit section will deal with a specific aspect of NewsHour coverage to be determined in consultation with the Project Mentor.

    Full Description: The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Boston to digitally preserve and make accessible public television and radio programs from the past 70 years. The AAPB website includes curated exhibits and special collections that explore how public broadcasting has covered subjects such as civil rights, elections, and climate change.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to conduct research using authoritative sources; knowledge of U.S. history and international affairs since 1975.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of broadcasting and journalism practices; HTML skills; experience with digital humanities tools.

  • #10 – Manuscript Division Reference and Resources (Manuscript Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow working in this project in the Manuscript Reading Room, will assist researchers in accessing the division's collections electronically. The Junior Fellows will create special research guides projects that improve researcher access to the materials, such as LibGuides, and assist in developing new deliverables such as handouts and tutorials, for researchers to better understand how to access our collections virtually.

    Full Description: Overseeing a collection of approximately 70 million primary source items relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. Among the collections are the personal papers of notable Americans such as Abraham Lincoln and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, as well as the records of non-governmental organizations such as the NAACP and the National Woman’s Party.

    The Junior Fellow working in this project in the Manuscript Reading Room, will assist researchers in accessing the division's collections electronically. Under the direction of a designated reference librarian mentor, the Junior Fellow will respond to reference inquiries received via electronic means; analyze reference requests; investigate sources of information; draft, revise, and deliver responses. The Junior Fellows may also work on special finding aids projects that improve researcher access to the materials, such as LibGuides (online research guide), and assist in developing new deliverables such as handouts and tutorials, for researchers to better understand how to access our collections virtually. Through an exposure to various aspects of archival reference and description, the Junior Fellows will gain an introductory knowledge of the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference.

    The Junior Fellows will work with Manuscript Reading Room partners to promote our collections, experts and services to their networks; make the Library's collections available to a broader public; participate in producing handouts, resources and other deliverables made available online by the division and/or third party affiliates.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Applicants are required to have demonstrated knowledge of American history and culture; ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting; ability to communicate effectively in writing; ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems; ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience working in a research library environment; knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies.

  • #11 – Identifying Bengali Titles from the Franklin Book Program (Asian Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist in the identification of Bengali items to make this collection accessible to the public by inventorying the properly romanized Bengali titles and identifying the titles of the original English publications using scanned materials and pre-existing record for the South Asian language materials (Urdu and Bengali) within this collection.

    Full Description: The Asian Division serves as custodian for Asian language items in 5 of 10 languages from the Franklin Book Program Collection (FBP) housed at the Library of Congress. Between 1952 and 1978, FBP assisted developing countries in the creation, production, distribution, and use of books and educational materials in vernacular languages. The program selected English materials about science, technology, poetry, and history, and had them translated into vernacular languages by authors and translators in those countries. This project will focus on the 326 uncatalogued Bengali titles in this collection via a virtual project.

    The Junior Fellow will receive scans from each book and be responsible for inventorying the properly romanized Bengali titles along with identifying the titles of the original English publications. The Junior Fellow will also search for pre-existing records to assist the Oversees Operation Delhi office in creating records in the future. The identification of these Bengali items is the first step in making this collection accessible to the public. The Junior Fellow will conduct research about the FBP that will go into an entry for the Library’s Four Corners of the World blog, summarizing their experience of using this collection and investigate a topic of interest. Second, the Junior Fellow will work with their mentor to begin a LibGuide (online finding guide) for the South Asian language materials (Urdu and Bengali) from the FBP Collection. The creation of a LibGuide will, in turn, make those items discoverable by potential users. The project fellow’s blog will bring added light to these items and possible avenues for research and connect more people to the Library in more meaningful ways.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Advanced level Bengali is a requirement for this project; intermediate level proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite, especially Word and Excel; knowledge of and interest in the South Asian region, particularly Bangladesh.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience in Bengali translation and transliteration; experience working in a public, research, or university library (e.g., reference, collection services, circulation); knowledge of American literature.

  • #12 – New Ways to See Lighting and Fading Data (Preservation Research & Testing Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will incorporate existing data sets into new and evolving data processing interfaces, using software and programming skills. This project will explore how varied light-testing data can be presented using online and interactive visualization tools.

    Full Description: The Preservation Research and Testing Division (PRTD) frequently undertakes fade-testing with partner divisions to evaluate the light sensitivity of objects for exhibition. This testing spans multiple types of lighting and a range of collections material, and its results enable the safe exhibition of LC collections and ensures their long term preservation during display. PRTD also collects readings of light levels and emission spectra in Library spaces to assess the conditions experienced by our collections.

    This project will explore how varied light-testing data can be presented using online and interactive visualization tools. For example, many institutions are adding LED lighting to exhibitions and public spaces, including LC. User-friendly tools incorporating data from both LEDs and older light sources will facilitate discussions around the use of different light sources in collections and exhibit spaces.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: At least 3 semesters of hands-on laboratory experience (in any scientific field); experience navigating and using laboratory software; familiarity with Excel, Chem Office, SigmaPlot, or comparable data management and manipulation software, and comfort with transferring and interpreting files and data; demonstrated ability to manage work time, work independently, and track work progress on a multi-person project; previous experience with any spectroscopy analysis, display, or spectral processing software.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Previous experience working in a cultural heritage institution; familiarity with light measurement instruments and spectroscopy (of any sort); familiarity with principles of effective data visualization; previous experience with or knowledge of writing ink, printing ink, and artists’ paint formulations and/or deterioration.

  • #13 – Preservation: Cataloguing & Characterization (Preservation Research & Testing Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will help to build a reference library of collection material types that will be used to characterize known materials on Library collection items which greatly expands and benefits the data in the Library’s Center for Heritage Analytical Reference Materials digital (CHARM-D). Cataloging this information allows other Library, archive and heritage institutions to potentially share in the historic testing and analysis of these characterized materials.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will work with PRTD staff to catalog and baseline characterize a number of collections in CHARM. The Junior Fellow will enter data in the CHARM-D database, specific metadata and cataloguing requirements for a range of scientific instrumentation Characterizing these allows us to see what materials in Library collection from specific time periods might be more at-risk, allowing for more proactive preservation actions. Given the importance of access to these reference materials and the data, the Junior Fellow will also work on helping further our internal vocabulary and modeling initiatives for CHARM-D, cross-walking between scientific and humanities cultural heritage data. Additionally, the Junior Fellow will help refresh and update public-facing resources for the ANC Mellon project and PRTD’s CHARM-D, to share data and show LC leadership in this area.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Background experience with chemistry, scientific laboratory experience; Junior Fellow should have completed at least two courses in chemistry or related areas and be able to demonstrate good ability in these areas; be able to understand data organization and manipulation database platforms; prior laboratory and experience in the sciences is highly desirable; working knowledge of statistics and computer software, including Excel, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint; proficiency in writing reports.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: JavaScript, Python or other statistical data analytical experience preferred, but not required.

  • #14 – African Section Poster Collection (African and Middle East Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will create a searchable inventory of posters from Africa, amassed since the 1960’s and held in the African Section Pamphlet Collection.

    Full description: The African Section of AMED has custody of a rich and vast collection of material amassed over the last 60 years. It is broadly called the “The African Section Pamphlet Collection,” and sections of it were cataloged in the 1990s. This is a collection of ephemera in the form of non-published materials, documents, government reports, press clippings, calendars, language publications, sample serials, scrapbooks, postcards, memorabilia from elections and campaigning, etc. For accessibility and security of the collections, the African Section staff has gradually compiled searchable inventories. The inventories are used by researchers to peruse, identify and request materials.

    One category of material in the African Section’s Pamphlet Collection contains posters from Africa amassed since the 1960’s. Although rich in subject content, these posters were determined to be outside of the collecting scope for the Prints and Photographs Division and were subsequently placed in the African Section. Over 700 posters are available to researchers but retrieval of a specific item or subject is not easy. The African Section currently has research quality scans of some of its posters which are heavily requested by individuals for research purposes; and often retrieved by staff LC and for AMED exhibits. The Junior Fellow will create a searchable inventory of these posters from Africa to expedite access.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to use Adobe Photoshop and Microsoft Excel; Ability to plan, organize, and maintain an efficient workflow.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Background in African Studies or history would preferred but not required; General computer skills.

  • #15 – New Technologies for Ancient Hebrew Texts (Hebraic Section)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will work to improve access to two uncatalogued collections 17th -20th centuries Haggadot and Prayer Books. The metadata generated for these records will be added to books that become available in the Library’s digital collections.

    Full Description: This project builds on a highly successful Junior Fellows project carried out the Hebraic Section in 2019 that increased accessibility of uncatalogued collections. In this session we seek to apply the same method to two additional uncatalogued collections for which we have existing Finding Aids. These include: uncatalogued Haggadot from the 17th-20 centuries; and uncatalogued Prayer Books from the 17th-20 centuries Altogether, the collections include 1200 books. The Junior Fellow will be responsible for transferring the information into an associated spreadsheet template. These newly generated records will provide the necessary metadata when these books become digitized.

    Required: Skills/Knowledge Desired: Absolute attention to detail; interest in learning updated library techniques; good computer skills and a willingness to master Excel; ability to work independently but also to listen to supervision when necessary; Basic reading knowledge of Hebrew; the equivalent of one year of college Hebrew, at the least.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: A love of books (and of Hebrew books in particular); a desire to improve your Hebrew; intellectual curiosity.

  • #16 – Carvalho Monteiro Collection (Collections Management Division)

    Short description: Quite genuinely, this project enriches the library experience for researchers – both the casual researcher who happens upon an unexpected resource serendipitously and the more “serious” researcher who is tracking down a specific title.

    It also emphasizes the active use, and not just preservation, of the Main Reading Room with LibGuide collections.

    Full description: This project supports: expanding access to our print/physical collections and their complementary online resources; increasing visibility of our subject matter expertise and the research resources they develop, using connectors to bridge our online and print collections; enhancing the researcher’s experience as they are using the physical collection. This project brings a modern approach to print reference collections through the use of online research guides, highlighting eResources, etc.

    The Junior Fellow will address exclusively the part of the processing related to updating bibliographic records in the Library of Congress Bibliographic database (ILS) of items already identified as belonging to the Carvalho Monteiro (CM) library in order to record the provenance of each item in the bibliographic record. The Junior Fellow will also research aspects of the collections and the life of CM that can lead to more clues to find books. Carvalho Monteiro (CM) library is an approximately 30,000-volume private library created by Brazilian-born Portuguese businessman, Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro (1850-1920). There is no documentation with a list of books purchased. CMD in 2012, consists of several steps, including finding, reviewing and identifying items from the CM library in order to create a detailed list of items purchased by the Library and update the bibliographic records to record the provenance of the items found in order to give access to researchers worldwide. 

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of the division's collections, to prepare collection items for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills: Basic to advanced computer skills particularly experience with content management systems/web editing), ability to work both independently and collaboratively.  

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Interest Knowledge of Latin languages, such as Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and French is not required, but preferable.

  • #17 – Copyright Communication and Data Analytics (Public Information & Education)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist the Copyright Office more effectively execute its communication strategies, which in turn will fulfill the Library’s mission to engage, inspire, and inform the Congress and the American people with a universal and enduring source of knowledge and creativity. The Junior Fellow will analyze existing data from communications to determine trends and best practices and explore areas for additional data collection efforts to optimize Copyright office communications.

    Full Description: The Copyright Office promotes creativity and free expression by administering the nation’s copyright laws and by providing impartial expert advice on copyright law and policy. In 2019 the Office launched a new, audience-first communication strategy to share educational initiatives, policy updates, and public programming with a vast array of copyright creators and users, including writers, musicians, photographers, graphic designers, bloggers, publishers, and educators, as well as legal practitioners. As the strategy enters its second year of implementation, the Office of Education and Outreach seeks a Junior Fellow to assist with data driven communications evaluation.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Data Analysis; advanced Excel skills; communications experience, education, or interest.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Adobe Analytics; strategic communications planning; program evaluation.

  • #18 – LC Labs Outreach and Audience Research (Digital Strategy)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will work collaboratively with LC Labs to identify key audiences for Labs projects and initiatives that produce visual and innovative outreach materials for key audiences. This project will independently research and develop messages and strategies to reach those audiences, and use qualitative and quantitative analysis to evaluate impact.

    Full Description: The Digital Strategy Directorate, formed in 2018, implements the Library’s Digital Strategy and provides a space for innovation and experimentation around the Library’s digital collections and data. The Junior Fellow will participate in Digital Strategy communications work by creating and developing a report about key target audiences for each of these projects. The Junior Fellow will participate in Digital Strategy communications work by creating and developing a report about key target audiences for each of these projects. Under the guidance from their Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will either choose or be assigned a particular project in particular to create and assist with executing a phased outreach and communications plan.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Strong research, writing, and editing skills required; knowledge of the affordances and limitations of social media platforms.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge and experience in communications and outreach for digital products and/or services strongly preferred; familiarity with digital scholarship or digital humanities projects; and innovation Labs in galleries, archives, libraries, and museums preferred.

  • #19 – Constitution Annotated Website: Supreme Court Biographies (American Law Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist the Congressional Research Service (CRS) to identify relevant materials from the Library’s digital collections to prepare biographies of selected Supreme Court Justices. The Junior Fellow will also assist CRS by brainstorming how the Library’s digital materials can be used to enhance constitution.congress.gov to make the Constitution Annotated website more accessible to college students.

    Full Description: The Supreme Court Justice Project will augment the ongoing effort of Congressional Research Service (CRS) to modernize the Constitution Annotated, a document that federal law requires the Librarian of Congress to prepare. Currently, the online Constitution Annotated Table of Supreme Court Justices identifies only the names, terms, appointing President, and noteworthy opinions for each Supreme Court Justice. CRS’s long-term plan for the table, however, has been to link each Justice to a more detailed biography, which will enable website users to contextualize the Justice’s jurisprudence in light of his personal background and the historical period worked. Along with a description of each Justice, the online biography will include images from or links to Library materials that are pertinent to the Justice’s life, their judicial decisions and particular historical era. The Junior Fellow will contribute to the online presence of the Constitution Annotated by developing, with the assistance of Library of Congress attorneys, biographical materials to be incorporated into the Table of Supreme Court Justices.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: An interest in cutting edge work on constitutional and Supreme Court history or the digital humanities; currently in undergraduate or graduate program with a focus on history or law; strong writing skills and the ability to write for a general audience; the ability to conduct online research.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as a team; a passion for constitutional law and Supreme Court history; familiarity with user experience concepts in website design.

  • #20 – Primary Source Teacher Resource (Learning and Innovation Office)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will contribute to the development of an educational resource highlighting items from the historical collections of the Library of Congress related to civic engagement and social change while supporting teacher professional development and student exploration related to those collections. Duties will include conducting research on the topics; selecting online primary sources from the Library's collections for inclusion in the teacher resource; drafting text for background materials; brainstorming promotional ideas for spreading the word about the resource in the K-12 educational community.

    Full Description: The Professional Learning and Outreach Initiatives Office of the Library of Congress, as a service to the nation's K-12 educators and learners, provides materials and programs that support the effective classroom use and exploration of historical primary sources. The Junior Fellow will conduct research in the online collections of the Library of Congress under the guidance of Professional Learning staff and to develop an inventory of unique historical artifacts and documents that will be of high value to educators teaching about civic engagement and social change. The Junior Fellow will deliver an inventory of high-value primary sources from the Library's online collection for use by K-12 educators teaching about topics connected to civic engagement, together with a draft of possible content for a teacher resource or resource/activity for learners incorporating those primary sources. The Junior Fellow will also deliver promotional content to promote the use of the educational resource.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: The ability to conduct online research; writing for an educational audience; academic background in either U.S. history or K-12 education.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as part of a team; familiarity with current K-12 educational practices and issues.

  • #21 – Archiving the National Book Festival (National Book Festival)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will create documentation and collateral material for the National Book Festival in order to enhance the attendee experience. This project will allow the Junior Fellow(s) to gain experience in the inner workings of planning a major festival for a government agency.

    Full Description: The Library of Congress National Book Festival is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors as participants and thousands of attendees. Coordination of activities must be as near to flawless as possible. The Junior Fellow will also have the opportunity to attend festival meetings and attend the festival online. The work entails identifying key sections of content and reorganizing the material into more easily digestible forms (e.g. a series of podcasts with specific themes), and adding metadata and additional descriptive materials where necessary). The event is highly complex and requires coordination of many tasks and details. Facilitating communications among all the players in this event is critical to a successful festival. This project will expose the Junior Fellow to the inner workings of planning a major festival for a government agency.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to work effectively and efficiently with others; ability to communicate in orally and in writing ; ability to apply basic project management principles, concepts and methodologies; ability to plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines; ability to work autonomously and use critical thinking; knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Background in humanities, information science, and basic experience with editing and processing digital audio and video files; knowledge of best practices in website management; knowledge of best practices in podcast creation.

  • #22 – Resources for Intergenerational Learning (Informal Learning)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will contribute to the Library’s resources for families and other intergenerational groups by developing a new collections-based family activity kits and blog posts.

    Full Description: The Junior Fellow will contribute to the Library’s resources for families and other intergenerational groups by developing a new collections-based family activity kit for loc.gov/families. The Junior Fellow will also write posts for Minerva’s Kaleidoscope, the Library’s blog for families. The Junior Fellow will be expected to participate in planning meetings for the Library’s new education venue in the Southwest Corridor of the Jefferson Building and contribute to planning for Library of Congress program that will be held onsite at a future date.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Proficiency in writing and communicating in English.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience engaging audiences in informal learning settings (museums, libraries, science centers); Experience working with youth and family audiences including children ages 7-13.

  • #23 – Literary Program Development (Poetry and Literature Center)

    Short description: The work of the 2021 Literary Initiatives Junior Fellow will continue to expand and improve access to and outreach for the National Book Festival and other high-profile Literary Initiatives activities of the Library of Congress.

    Full Description: The Literary Initiatives Office develops signature literary programs at the Library of Congress, including the National Book Festival and National Book Festival Presents, and administers literary ambassador positions such as the U.S. Poet Laureate, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, and the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction winner. The spring and summer months are the most crucial for developing and managing program content for the National Book Festival as the primary focus of this fellowship.

    From writing and editing author biographies, to gathering and organizing content for the festival’s digital presence, to creating and managing descriptive content for author presentations, the Junior Fellow will receive valuable training in arts administration while working on one of the country’s premier literary festivals.

    This project work supports the Library’s mission to engage, inspire, and inform Congress and the American people by fostering and enhancing the public’s appreciation of literature and its integral importance in our everyday lives.

    In collaboration with the Project Mentor, the Junior Fellow will identify and describe materials representative of this project for an exhibit presentation by all Junior Fellows near the conclusion of the program.

    Required Skills/Knowledge Desired: Strong organizational skills, with ability to set and meet deadlines; ability to communicate effectively in writing; advanced proficiency in use of computer software; excellent research skills; basic knowledge of and comfort with inputting data into content management systems; creative and organizational flexibility.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience with data organization, visualization, and analysis.

Junior Fellows Program 2021 Specific Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is GS 3-1 pay?

    This position is paid at GS 3-1 level. You will be paid at the rate for Washington, DC. https://www.opm.gov/policy-data-oversight/pay-leave/salaries-wages/2020/general-schedule/.

  2. What is Flexitime?

    Fellows work a full 40-hour/week schedule. Two weeks equal a pay period.  Fellows work 8 hours per day. For this reason, when determining the schedule to be worked, you will log off 8.5 hours after starting. With Project Mentor prior discussion and approval, Fellows may adjust their schedule within the Pay Period. Library’s core hours require most staff (including Fellows) to begin between 6:30am and 9:30am and end the day between 3:00pm and 6:00 pm (Eastern Time).

  3. Do I need to provide a transcript?

    A legible copy of your latest college/university transcripts is required with your online application. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable at the time of application. Official transcripts will be required if selected for the position. Transcripts must be issued by the college or university, and must include your name, the name of the institution, and the courses and course dates. Screenshots, Word or other text documents, and stand-alone course lists are not acceptable. Failure to submit the required legible documentation at the time of application will result in disqualification. Note to Freshman:  If you are freshman at your institution and do not have an unofficial transcript at your disposal, please submit another document from your institution and/or registrar’s office to certify your current enrollment. Failure to provide any proof of enrollment will result in disqualification from consideration.

  4. How competitive is the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program?

    Based on our experience with other fellowship programs offered here at the Library of Congress, we expect this to be a highly competitive program, with a large number of applications from very qualified and motivated students. Therefore, we must strictly adhere to the requirements for application packages and the deadline for their submission. Interested applicants are encouraged to carefully read the application criteria and procedures.

  5. What are the selecting officials looking for in the application?

    Selecting officials may consider course selection, work experience, language skills, and interests related to the various subject areas noted on the announcement. While not required, experience or education in library-related fields can be a plus.  

  6. I am interested in more than one subject area of this program. Can I apply to more than one? Must I submit separate applications for each?

    In your cover letter, state explicitly your areas of interest. Your education, experience, and general background should affirm your selections and demonstrate your wish for serious consideration for each subject area you identified. Submit only one application package. If you are only interested in only one specific project choice, repeat it as your 1st, 2nd and 3rd preference.

  7. Do you provide housing or transportation?

    No. This is a virtual program and you will work from home.

  8. How many academic credits do I receive in the program?

    The Library of Congress is not an academic institution and does not grant course credits. However, you may check with your school about receiving credits for your fellowship if interested.

  9. I am not available to start the fellowship on Monday, May 24, 2021 Am I still eligible?

    The schedule and the length of the fellowship direct that we require all fellows to report on the same day, Monday, May 24, 2021.

  10. Can my fellowship lead to a full-time job?

    The fellowships come with no guarantee for permanent employment. However, we encourage those interested in careers at the Library of Congress to look at all job opportunities listed on the USAJOBS website and the Library’s Careers website. The new skills and experience gained during your time at the Library can be used as a stepping stone and the supervisor of your fellowship can be a valuable reference for your future job searches.

  11. Will these fellowships be offered in the Fall/Winter?

    No. This is a summer fellowship program only.
    For additional information about internships and fellowships at the Library of Congress, visit the Internship and Fellowship Program portal: https://www.loc.gov/ifp Click on the Overview tab to explore other internships at the Library of Congress.