Article William Gottlieb on Assignment

William P. Gottlieb took most of his photographs while on assignments for the Washington Post, Down Beat magazine, and Record Changer. He had a weekly jazz column in the Post, a series of articles and reviews in Down Beat, and a monthly column in Record Changer. This special presentation features four examples of his Down Beat assignments. (The displayed portraits below represent a single shoot; other photographs of the artists can be found elsewhere in the collection.)

Thelonious Monk -- Genius of Bop: Elusive Pianist Finally Caught in an Interview

Image: Thelonious MonkDown Beat 14, no. 20 (Sept. 24, 1947): 2.

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When the elusive Thelonious Monk disappeared from the jazz scene in 1947, Gottlieb embarked on a mission to track down the jazz giant. With the help of Mary Lou Williams, widely regarded as the most significant female instrumentalist, composer, and arranger in jazz, Gottlieb located Monk and took him to Minton's Playhouse where he had once worked as house pianist.

Dardanelle is Versatile: Dardanelle and Her Trio

Image: DardanelleDown Beat 13, no. 13 (June 17, 1946): 13.

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An accomplished pianist, vibraphonist, and singer, Dardanelle has led an active career as a pioneering female jazz performer, recording artist, and radio and television personality. She is one of the few jazz musicians from the "Golden Age of Jazz" with whom Gottlieb still maintains a close relationship. On this particular Down Beat assignment, Gottlieb reviewed a performance by his friend Dardanelle when she appeared at the Sheraton Hotel with Joe Sinacore and Bert Nazer. In typical Down Beat fashion, the article concludes with a response from the artist.

Lion Tracked to his Lair -- or Willie Smith's Story

Image: Willie SmithDown Beat 16, no. 1 (Jan. 1, 1947): 14.

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Willie "the Lion" Smith's flamboyant character, coupled with his legendary derby hat, cigar, and thick glasses, made him an ideal sitter for a Gottlieb portrait. Approximately ten years after Gottlieb met "The Lion" for the first time, he interviewed the jazz pianist and composer in his home. The subsequent piece is characterized by Gottlieb's clever and witty "hep cat" writing style.

Buddy Rich Forgets His Drums; Leads a New, Sweeter Band

Image: Buddy RichDown Beat 14, no. 11 (May 21, 1947): 14.

View Article | View Photos (Assign. 117)

Gottlieb reviewed drum virtuoso Buddy Rich in concert when Rich was leading his own band and had begun to experiment with singing. Several times throughout his career, Rich quit playing drums to be either a dancer or a singer, but ultimately he always returned to drumming. His vocal style has been compared to Mel Tormé's and Frank Sinatra's. At the end of the article, Rich responds favorably to Gottlieb's assessment of the concert.

 

About this Item

Title
William Gottlieb on Assignment
Subject Headings
-  Jazz -- History and criticism -- Pictorial works
-  Articles
-  Songs and Music
Genre
article
Online Format
image
online text
Description
Article. Article. Gottlieb reviewed drum virtuoso Buddy Rich in concert when Rich was leading his own band and had begun to experiment with singing. Several times throughout his career, Rich quit playing drums to be either a dancer or a singer, but ultimately he always returned to drumming. His vocal style has been compared to Mel Tormé's and Frank Sinatra's. At the end of the article, Rich responds favorably to Gottlieb's assessment of the concert. 
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Rights & Access

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

In accordance with the wishes of William Gottlieb, the photographs in this collection entered into the public domain on February 16, 2010, but rights of privacy and publicity may apply. Privacy and publicity rights protect the interests of the person(s) who may be the subject(s) of the work or intellectual creation. Users of photographs in the Gottlieb collection are responsible for clearing any privacy or publicity rights associated with the use of the images.

The following items are included in the William P. Gottlieb Collection with permission as noted:

Articles from Down Beat magazine by William Gottlieb and others, Ed Enright, Editor, Down Beat magazine, 102 North Haven Road, Elmhurst, IL 60126-3370.

"The Faces of Jazz," by W. Royal Stokes, Civilization, vol. 2, no. 5, September-October 1995, Civilizaton, Attn. Managing Editor, 666 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, Suite 303, Washington, D.C. 20003. Reproduced by permission. All rights reserved.

Credit Line: William P. Gottlieb/Ira and Leonore S. Gershwin Fund Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress.

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Chicago citation style:

William Gottlieb on Assignment. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185863/. (Accessed July 21, 2017.)

APA citation style:

William Gottlieb on Assignment. [Online Text] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185863/.

MLA citation style:

William Gottlieb on Assignment. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185863/>.