Article "The Friends We Love" by Septimus Winner

The Friends We Love, 1868, by Septimus Winner, 1827-1902.
The Friends We Love, 1868. Septimus Winner, 1827-1902. Music Division, Library of Congress. Call number: M1621.W

The Friends We Love was published in 1868 under Winner's pseudonym Alice Hawthorne. Winner's music store, established with one of his brothers shortly after they completed high school in Philadelphia, published this simple strophic choral ballad. The music store provided Winner, who was proficient on the violin and guitar, a place to teach music lessons and to market his own songs and methods books. In 1888, Oliver Ditson and Company purchased the entire catalog, and the Winner firm dissolved.

This ballad features a classical style accompaniment that begins and ends the piece. Its musical theme, though typically limited to one octave, is uncharacteristically complex both in rhythm and melodic shape. The choral refrain, also slightly more complicated than most of Winner's refrains, is written in a duet style.

Winner wrote many such ballads during the civil war years. They were perhaps even more popular than those of his contemporary, Stephen Foster. According to Charles Claghorn, author of The Mocking Bird: The Life and Diary of Its Author, Septimus Winner, President Abraham Lincoln's favorite song was Winner's Listen to the Mockingbird, another simple ballad. The appeal of these popular songs was not only their sentimentality but that they were readily understood, comfortable to sing, and easily appreciated by all classes of the musical public.

About this Item

Title
"The Friends We Love" by Septimus Winner
Subject Headings
-  Winner, Septimus, 1827-1902
-  Popular Songs of the Day
-  Songs and Music
-  Parlor and Concert Stage
-  Civil War and Reconstruction (1861-1877)
-  Articles
Genre
article
Online Format
image
online text
Description
Article. Winner wrote many such ballads during the civil war years. They were perhaps even more popular than those of his contemporary, Stephen Foster. According to Charles Claghorn, author of The Mocking Bird: The Life and Diary of Its Author, Septimus Winner, President Abraham Lincoln's favorite song was Winner's Listen to the Mockingbird, another simple ballad. The appeal of these popular songs was not only their sentimentality but that they were readily understood, comfortable to sing, and easily appreciated by all classes of the musical public.
Additional Metadata Formats
METSXML Record

Rights & Access

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permission ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses.

Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

In some cases, the Library was unable to identify a possible rights holder and has elected to place some of those items online as an exercise of fair use for strictly non-commercial educational uses. The Library of Congress would like to learn more about these materials and would like to hear from individuals or institutions that have any additional information or know of their history. Please contact:  Performing Arts Reading Room.

Suggested credit line: Library of Congress.

The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permission ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses.

Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

In some cases, the Library was unable to identify a possible rights holder and has elected to place some of those items online as an exercise of fair use for strictly non-commercial educational uses. The Library of Congress would like to learn more about these materials and would like to hear from individuals or institutions that have any additional information or know of their history. Please contact:  Performing Arts Reading Room.

Suggested credit line: Library of Congress, Music Division.

More about Copyright and other Restrictions

For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

"TheFriends We Love" by Septimus Winner. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185409/. (Accessed May 22, 2017.)

APA citation style:

"TheFriends We Love" by Septimus Winner. [Online Text] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185409/.

MLA citation style:

"TheFriends We Love" by Septimus Winner. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185409/>.