Article "The Carol of the Beasts" by Peter C. Lutkin

The Carol of the Beasts, 1922, by Peter C. Lutkin, 1858-1931.
The Carol of the Beasts, 1922. Peter C. Lutkin, 1858-1931. Music Division, Library of Congress. Call number: M2085.L87 C37 1922

Lutkin wrote The Carol of the Beasts for the Northwestern University A Cappella Choir. By 1922, the year this setting was published, the choir had toured widely and had been a featured performing ensemble at a conference of the Music Teachers National Association.

Lutkin's Christmas carol arrangements were often written in five parts to be sung by himself, his wife, his son, his daughter-in-law, and his grandson, Peter Christian II. Two of the most interesting carols were written in such a way that they could be sung right side up as a Christmas greeting in one key and upside down as a New Year greeting in another key.

According to Pauline Graybill Kennel, Lutkin's biographer, he seemed to be at his best when composing shorter works. Carol of the Beasts, only four pages long, is an unaccompanied arrangement of a simple Christmas song by George Coleman Gow, professor of music at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, from 1895 to 1932. The four verses are set for a solo voice or small section of four voices. Verses one and three are modal, cadencing on B-flat, while the second and fourth are set a whole-step higher. The music captures both the character and rhythm of Gow's verse by means of occasional meter shifts. Short choral interjections of "noel" imitate horn calls. These choral clarion calls provide a grand crescendo in the final three measures to a full-textured, divisi, G-sharp-major cadence.

About this Item

Title
"The Carol of the Beasts" by Peter C. Lutkin
Subject Headings
-  Lutkin, Peter Christian, 1858-1931
-  Worship and Praise
-  Songs and Music
-  Parlor and Concert Stage
-  Progressive Era to New Era (1900-1929)
-  Articles
Genre
article
Online Format
image
online text
Description
Article. According to Pauline Graybill Kennel, Lutkin's biographer, he seemed to be at his best when composing shorter works. Carol of the Beasts, only four pages long, is an unaccompanied arrangement of a simple Christmas song by George Coleman Gow, professor of music at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, from 1895 to 1932. The four verses are set for a solo voice or small section of four voices. Verses one and three are modal, cadencing on B-flat, while the second and fourth are set a whole-step higher. The music captures both the character and rhythm of Gow's verse by means of occasional meter shifts. Short choral interjections of "noel" imitate horn calls. These choral clarion calls provide a grand crescendo in the final three measures to a full-textured, divisi, G-sharp-major cadence.
Additional Metadata Formats
METSXML Record

Rights & Access

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permission ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses.

Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

In some cases, the Library was unable to identify a possible rights holder and has elected to place some of those items online as an exercise of fair use for strictly non-commercial educational uses. The Library of Congress would like to learn more about these materials and would like to hear from individuals or institutions that have any additional information or know of their history. Please contact:  Performing Arts Reading Room.

Suggested credit line: Library of Congress.

The Library of Congress is providing access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permission ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses.

Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

In some cases, the Library was unable to identify a possible rights holder and has elected to place some of those items online as an exercise of fair use for strictly non-commercial educational uses. The Library of Congress would like to learn more about these materials and would like to hear from individuals or institutions that have any additional information or know of their history. Please contact:  Performing Arts Reading Room.

Suggested credit line: Library of Congress, Music Division.

More about Copyright and other Restrictions

For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

"TheCarol of the Beasts" by Peter C. Lutkin. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185389/. (Accessed July 25, 2017.)

APA citation style:

"TheCarol of the Beasts" by Peter C. Lutkin. [Online Text] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185389/.

MLA citation style:

"TheCarol of the Beasts" by Peter C. Lutkin. Online Text. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200185389/>.