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May 29, 2013

Library of Congress Announces Winners of New Prize for Drawings of Historic Sites, Structures and Landscapes

The Library of Congress, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Architectural Record magazine, announces the winners for the first two years of a new prize for the best single-sheet, measured drawing of an historic building, site or structure prepared to the standards of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) or the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS).

The Leicester B. Holland Prize is an annual competition administered by the Heritage Documentation Programs of the National Park Service. The competition’s jury recommends winners to the Library of Congress and the Library’s Center for Architecture, Design and Engineering, which supports the prize through the Paul Rudolph Trust. The Rudolph Trust was established by, and in memory of, the distinguished American architect Paul Rudolph, a proponent of the art of architectural drawing.

The winner receives a $1,000 cash prize and a certificate of recognition. Honorable mentions receive a merit award of $500. Architectural Record is the media sponsor for the prize, and will publish the winning drawings in its June 2013 issue and online edition.

Images of the 2011 and the 2012 first-place prize winners are available in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Online Catalog. The Buckminster Fuller Dome Home in Carbondale, Ill., and the White Rock Lookout Tower, in Cosby, Tenn. (For maximum detail, open the TIFF files.)

The prize is intended to increase awareness, knowledge and appreciation of historic sites, structures and landscapes throughout the United States, and to encourage the submission of drawings by professionals and students. All the drawings accepted for the competition will be added to the permanent HABS, HAER and HALS Collection in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress.

For information on how to participate in the Leicester B. Holland Prize: A Single-Sheet Measured Drawing Competition, visit this site (external link).

2011 Winners

  • Thad Heckman won the 2011 Holland Prize for his HABS measured drawing of the Richard Buckminster Fuller and Anne Hewlett Fuller Dome Home in Carbondale, Ill. The home was designed and built by Fuller as his residence. Heckman is an architect and proprietor of Design Works in Carbondale. He also is an assistant instructor of architectural studies at Southern Illinois University.
  • Akanksha (Niki) Rao, an historic preservation specialist, is an honorable-mention winner for her HABS measured drawing of the Grace Episcopal Church in Utica, N.Y. She works for Black River Design in Montpelier, Vt.
  • Cate Bainton, a landscape historian in Richmond, Calif., is an honorable-mention winner for her HALS measured drawing of the Fleming Garden in Berkeley, Calif.

2012 Winners

  • Laura Beth Ingle, of Knoxville, Tenn., won the 2012 Holland Prize for her HABS measured drawing of the White Rock Lookout Tower, located in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. Ingle received a master’s degree in historic preservation. She works as an architectural historian in Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • Coby Vardy, from the University of Washington’s School of Built Environment, is an honorable-mention winner of the 2012 Holland Prize for his HABS measured drawing of the Kvisvik-Martindale Farm Chicken House in Vashon, Wash.
  • Cate Bainton, a landscape historian in Richmond, Calif., for a second consecutive year is an honorable-mention winner for her HALS measured drawing of the San Francisco National Cemetery in California.

To read more about the Holland Prize drawings, visit the blog of the Library of Congress Prints and Photograph Division.

Established by a bequest from the distinguished American architect Paul Rudolph, the Center for Architecture, Design and Engineering in the Library of Congress preserves and makes accessible to the public the Library’s rich collections in those subject areas. For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/adecenter/adecent.html.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 155 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats. The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.

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PR 13-093
05/29/13
ISSN 0731-3527

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