Contact: Helen Dalrymple (202) 707-1940
Request ASL and ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362

September 12, 2002

MEDIA ADVISORY

Public Events at the Library of Congress September-October 2002

Events subject to change. All phone numbers are 202 area code. All events are free and open to the public.

SEPTEMBER 2002

September 7
Saturday
EXHIBITION OPENS
“Witness and Response: September 11 Acquisitions at the Library of Congress” documents the stunning events of September 11—from the World Trade Center to the Pentagon to Pennsylvania —and tells the story through photographs, posters, cartoons, film clips, original and architectural drawings, maps, newspapers and Web sites. Visitors to the exhibition will also hear people’s responses to the events of the day in an audio portion of the exhibit titled “Soundscape,” a half- hour presentation that runs continuously in the Orientation Theater in the Visitors’Center, ground floor of the Jefferson Building. The exhibition is on view in the North Gallery of the Great Hall of the Jefferson Building, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday, through Oct. 26. Public contact: 707-4604.

September 10
Tuesday
CONCERT
Tom Paxton, folk singer-songwriter and recipient of the ASCAP Foundation 2002 Lifetime Achievement Award in Folk Music, author of such classics as “I Can't Help But Wonder Where I'm Bound,” “Under American Skies,” “Peace will come, and let it begin with me,” presents a solo outdoor concert on the Neptune Plaza of the Jefferson Building at noon. The performance includes “The Bravest,” Paxton’s tribute to the heroes of the New York police and fire departments who died on September 11, 2001. Public contact: 707-5510.

September 10
Tuesday
POETRY AT NOON
Marty Sanchez-Lowery and Romola D read from their works in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, at noon, in the first of the Poetry at Noon series for this season. Public contact: 707-1308.

September 11
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
In the “Witness and Response” exhibition, Georgia Higley, Serial Division, discusses newspapers from across the nation and around the world that chronicled the events of September 11, North Gallery of the Great Hall, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

September 12
Thursday
CONCERT
Loras John Schissel, Library music specialist, conducts the “Virginia Grand Military Band” in a program of American band music, including Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever” and “Summon the Heroes” by John Williams. Geoffrey Simon directs the Library of Congress Chorale in the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” and Stravinsky’s choral arrangement of “The Star- Spangled Banner.” The free concert takes place in the Jefferson Building’s Coolidge Auditorium at noon. No tickets are required. Public contact: 707-5502.

September 13
Friday
CONCERT
New York songwriter Suzanne Vega and fellow members of the Greenwich Village Songwriter’s Exchange feature their songs from the Vigil Project, a collection honoring the victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, in a performance in the Coolidge Auditorium at 8 p.m. Included is Vega’s own “It Hit Home”—a song expressing “feelings, thoughts and observations from someone trying to make sense out of something seemingly senseless.” The performance is free, but tickets are required; some standby tickets may be available at the door. Public contact: 707-5502.

September 18
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
Cassy Ammen (Humanities and Social Sciences Division) and Diane Kresh, director, Public Service Collections, discuss the Library’s September 11 Web Archive project, which preserves the Web expressions of individuals, groups, the press and institutions from around the world, in the “Witness and Response” exhibition, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

September 18
Wednesday
PANEL DISCUSSION
Jeremy Adamson, chief of the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division, moderates a panel discussion by the reporters who assembled the New York Times’ Pulitzer-Prize winning series “Portraits in Grief,” from 2 to 4 p.m., in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Library’s Madison Building. Panel members include: Jonathan Landman, Metro editor; Christine Kay, assistant Metro editor; Janny Scott, Metro reporter; Anthony DePalma, reporter, Financial desk; and Jan Hoffman, Metro reporter.

September 19
Thursday
CONCERT
Mingo Saldivar (2002 National Heritage Fellow) y sus Cuatro Espadas present a program of “Tex-Mex” music on the Jefferson Building’s Neptune Plaza at noon; sponsored by the Library’s American Folklife Center. Public contact: 707-5510.

September 19
Thursday
READING
Award-winning Israeli poet Ronny Someck reads from his works in Hebrew, with English translations read by Barbara Goldberg, in a program titled “The Fire Stays in Red.” The event takes place in Room LJ 119 of the Jefferson Building, at 12:30 p.m. Public contact: 707-3778.

September 23
Monday
BOOKS & BEYOND
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz discusses “Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America,” sponsored by the Center for the Book and the Humanities and Social Sciences Division; West Dining Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building at noon. Public contact: 707-5221.

September 24
Tuesday
PANEL DISCUSSION
Lawrence Reger, president, Heritage Preservation, and Jane Long, director of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force, co-chair a panel discussion on “The Impact of September 11 on Cultural Heritage,” from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building.

September 25
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
Maricia Battle, curator in the Prints and Photographs Division, discusses the burning of the White House and the Capitol during the War of 1812; in the “American Treasures” exhibition, Jefferson Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

September 26
Thursday
EXHIBITION OPENS
“When They Were Young: A Photographic Retrospective of Childhood,” presents timeless and compelling photographic images of children, spanning the history of photography from daguerreotype to documentary. The exhibition examines the experience of childhood as it is connected across time, culture, and diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. Included in the exhibition are photographs from the Library’s Farm Security Administration-Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) collection, which includes the works of photographers Jack Delano, Mary Post Wollcott, Russell Lee, Carl Mydans, John Vanchon, Gordon Parks and Dorothea Lange. On view Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., in the South Gallery of the Great Hall, Thomas Jefferson Building, through March 22, 2003. Public contact: (202) 707-4604.

September 27
Friday
LECTURE
Birgitta Ingemanson, Washington State University, speaks on “An American in Vladivostok: Mrs. Pray’s Letters and Photo Albums, 1894-1930,” in a program cosponsored by the European and Prints and Photographs divisions; Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-3704.

September 27
Friday
CONCERT
Shirley Caesar and ensemble present a concert of Gospel music in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m.; part of the American Folklife Center’s “Homegrown: The Music of America” series. Tickets are required; some standby tickets may be available at the door. Public contact: (202) 707-5510.

September 28
Saturday
SYMPOSIUM
Gospel symposium featuring Bishop Walter Hawkins, Mellonee Burnim, Albertina Walker, Anthony Heilbut and Twinkie Clark takes place in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. (no tickets required). As part of the American Folklife Center’s “Homegrown: The Music of America,” the Dixie Hummingbirds perform at the conclusion of the symposium. Public contact: (202) 707-5510.

OCTOBER 2002

October 2
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
Katherine Blood, Prints and Photographs Division, discusses “Artistic Responses to September 11”; and Carol Johnson, also of the Prints and Photographs Division, talks about “Eyewitness: Documentary Photography of September 11” in the “Witness and Response” exhibition, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

October 2
Wednesday
PANEL DISCUSSION
A panel discussion on “September 11th Comic Book Artists and Illustrators” takes place from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, with the following participants: Will Eisner, legendary creator in the fields of comics and graphic novels; Paul Levitz, president and publisher of DC Comics in New York, editor and contributor to the two-volume anthology of comic book art in response to September 11; Jeff Mason, publisher of Alternative Comics and editor of “9-11 Emergency Relief,” an anthology of comic book art relating to the events; Peter Kuper, noted comic artist, graphic novel creator and co-founder of World War 3 Illustrated; and Trina Robbins, leading artist, writer, and authority on the history of women comic artists. Public contact: 707-5836.

October 4
Friday
CONCERT
Santiago Jimenez Jr., singer and accordion virtuoso of the first rank, who plays in the traditional style of “conjunto”— the accordion-based musical tradition that originated in south Texas in the 1950s— performs on Neptune Plaza in front of the Jefferson Building, at noon (no tickets required). Part of the American Folklife Center’s “Homegrown: The Music of America” series. Public contact: 707-5510.

October 8
Tuesday
CONCERT
The Library’s American Folklife Center presents Bob McQuillen and Old New England contra dancing as part of its “Homegrown: The Music of America” series, Neptune Plaza of the Jefferson Building, at noon (no tickets required). Public contact: 707-5510.

October 9
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
Jim Flatness, Geography and Map Division, discusses maps as both tools and records of September 11; and Ann Hoog, American Folklife Center, talks about “Recording Americans’ Reactions” in the “Witness and Response” exhibition, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

October 9
Wednesday
POETRY READING
Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry Billy Collins reads from his works in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 6:45 p.m. No tickets required. Public contact: 707-5394.

October 11
Friday
EXHIBITION OPENS
The six winning entries for the design of the new Digital Talking Book (the “Dook”), developed for the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, are on view in the Mumford Foyer, sixth floor of the Madison Building, through mid-December. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday. Public contact: 707-9279.

October 12
Saturday
SECOND ANNUAL NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL
Sponsored by the Library of Congress and hosted by Laura Bush and, the festival features more than 70 award-winning authors, illustrators and storytellers and includes author readings, book discussions, performances by storytellers, a conservation clinic for family documents, and performances representing a wide range of America’s musical traditions. West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol and the adjacent Mall, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Public contact, toll-free: (888) 714-4696.

October 14
Monday
COLUMBUS DAY HOLIDAY
All Library of Congress facilities closed.

October 15
Tuesday
BOOKS & BEYOND
Lawrence W. Levine and Cornelia R. Levine discuss their new book “The People and the President: America’s Conversation With FDR” in a program cosponsored by the Center for the Book and the National Archives and Records Administration; Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:30 p.m. Public contact: 707-5521.

October 16
Wednesday
GALLERY TALK
C. Ford Peatross, curator of architecture and engineering collections, discusses “A New World Trade Center: Design Proposals from Around the World” in the “Witness and Response” exhibition, at noon. Public contact: 707-9203.

October 16
Wednesday
DISCUSSION
Photographer Carol Highsmith discusses her photographs of the aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the crash in Pennsylvania. The program is in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, from 1 p.m. to 2 :30 p.m. Public contact: 707-5836.

October 17
Thursday
POETRY READING
Carol Muske and Greg Delanty read from their works in the Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m.

October 17
Thursday
DANCE PERFORMANCE
The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange performs “Uneasy Dances” in commemoration of the events of September 11 in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. The dance program is free, but tickets are required; they are available through TicketMaster by calling (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707-5502.

October 18
Friday
LECTURE
Jonathan Scott Holloway, author of “Confronting the Veil: Abram Harris, Jr., E. Franklin Frazier, and Ralph Bunche, 1919-1941,” discusses his book in a program sponsored by the Humanities and Social Sciences Division, West Dining Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-0939.

October 18
Friday
CONCERT
The Los Angeles Piano Quartet performs in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. The program includes Harbison, November, 19, 1828 (1988); Turina, Piano Quartet in A Minor, op. 67; and Fauré, Piano Quartet in C Minor, op. 15. Tickets available Sept. 11 for a nominal service charge from TicketMaster by calling (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707-5502.

October 21
Monday
SYMPOSIUM
“Perspectives on American Book History” is a symposium featuring Scott Jasper, Joanne Chaison and Jeffrey Groves, the editors of the new book, “Perspectives on American Book History: Artifacts and Commentary”; sponsored by the Center for the Book with the American Antiquarian Society in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, from 9 a.m. to noon. Public contact: 707-5521.

October 22
Tuesday
DISCUSSION
Photographer Joel Meyerowitz discusses his photographs of the World Trade Center site, taken daily from September 11 to May of this year, in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Public contact: 707-5836.

October 23
Wednesday
LECTURE
Masahiko Aoki, Takahashi Professor in Economics at Stanford University, gives the 2002 Mansfield American-Pacific Lecture on “Whither Japanese Corporate Governance? Symptoms of Institutional Change, with an introduction by Hugh Patrick, director of the Center on Japanese Economy and Business at Columbia University Graduate School of Business, in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6 p.m. Public contact: 707-3302.

October 24
Thursday
POETRY READING
Lucille Clifton joins another poet in readings in the Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public contact: 707-5394.

October 25
Friday
SYMPOSIUM
The Library’s Office of Scholarly Programs and the African Middle Eastern Division cosponsor a workshop on “Teaching the Other: Muslims, Non-Muslims and the Stories They Teach,” focusing on how different societies instruct their children about other cultures, in LJ 113 and 119 of the Jefferson Building, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Public contact: 707-3302.

October 25
Friday
LECTURE
Irene McDermott, author of “The Librarians Internet Survival Guide,” speaks on “Surviving the Internet: Strategies for the High-Tech Reference Desk,” in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

October 27-28
Sunday-Monday
CONFERENCE
“Jewish Books/Jewish People: Texts, Literacy, and Culture Over the Centuries” is the topic of a two-day conference co-sponsored by the Library’s Hebraic Section and the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland. The Sunday session is at the McKeldin Library on the College Park campus; on Monday, sessions on “Creating Modern Jewish Readers” and “Jewish Books Today” take place in LJ 119 of the Library’s Jefferson Building, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Public contact: 707-3778.

October 29
Tuesday
POETRY AT NOON
“Mystery and Exoticism” is the topic for today’s program in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-1308.

October 30
Wednesday
CONCERT
Founder’s Day concert presents Kristjan Järvi’s Absolute, who perform pieces by Stravinsky, Michael Daugherty, Jimi Hendrix, Richard Strauss, James Brown and new works by the Absolute members, in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. The Founder’s Day concert celebrates the birth anniversary of the visionary Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, founder of the Library’s chamber concert series. Tickets available Sept. 11 from TicketMaster; call (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707- 5502.

NOVEMBER 2002

November 7
Thursday
CONCERT
Pinetop Perkins with the Bob Margolin Blues Band and Willie “Big Eyes” Smith perform in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at noon (no tickets required). The legendary piano icon is in his late 80s and is possibly the last of the great boogie and blues piano men whose style of playing has influenced three generations of performers. Part of the American Folklife Center’s “Homegrown: The Music of America” series. Public contact: 707-5510.

November 7
Thursday
POETRY READING
Poets Mary Jo Bang and Daniel Mark Epstein read in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public contact: 707-5394.

November 11
Monday
VETERANS DAY HOLIDAY
All Library of Congress facilities closed.

November 12-14
Tuesday-Thursday
SYMPOSIUM
“The Civil War and American Memory” is a major gathering of scholars of the period who will discuss all aspects of the Civil War in a two-day symposium. Gary W. Gallagher, John L. Nau III Professor of the History of the American Civil War, University of Virginia and co-editor of the just-released “The Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference” gives the keynote opening address from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Coolidge Auditorium, on Nov. 12. The panel discussions continue all day on Wednesday and Thursday in the Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, with a program of Civil War music at 8 p.m. in the Coolidge Auditorium on Nov. 13. For more information, call 707-5093.

November 13
Wednesday
CONCERT
The Cellicon Family presents a program of Zuni music and dance, sponsored by the American Folklife Center, part of “Homegrown: The Music of America” series; on Neptune Plaza in front of the Jefferson Building at noon (no tickets required). Public contact: 707-5510.

November 14
Thursday
POETRY READING
Kim Barnes and Robert Wrigley read from their works in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public contact: 707-5394.

November 15
Friday
CONCERT
Brentano String Quartet performs “Contrapuncti” from J.S. Bach’s “Art of Fugue,” along with short companion pieces commissioned from a diverse group of living American composers including Steven Mackey, Wynton Marsalis and Charles Wuorinen; in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. Tickets available Oct. 2 for a nominal service charge from TicketMaster; call (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707- 5502.

November 18
Monday
BOOKS & BEYOND
Peter Bridges discusses his new book, “Pen of Fire,” a biography of John Moncure Daniel, American diplomat and Confederate editor, in a program sponsored by the Center for the Book and the Newspaper Section, Serial and Government Publications Division, in Dining Room A, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-5221.

November 20
Wednesday
LECTURE
Brewster Kahle, co-founder of the Internet Archive, speaks in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

November 21
Thursday
CONCERT
Sylvia McNair headlines an evening of distinguished performers, which is hosted by Ted Chapin; the program showcases unknown and lesser-known songs in the Library’s Richard Rodgers Collection and takes place in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. Tickets available Oct. 9 for a nominal service charge from TicketMaster; call (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707-5502.

November 28
Thursday
THANKSGIVING DAY
All Library of Congress facilities closed.

DECEMBER 2002

December 2
Monday
CONCERT
New York Festival of Song, with Michael Barrett and Steven Blier, artistic directors, present a program of music by America’s “Killer B” composers—Samuel Barber, Amy Beach, Irving Berlin, Leonard Bernstein, William Bolcom and Paul Bowles—in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. Tickets available Oct. 23 for a nominal service charge from TicketMaster; call (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551-7328. Public contact: 707- 5502.

December 3
Tuesday
POETRY AT NOON
“Home and Hearth” is the holiday theme for the December readings in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public contact: 707-1308.

December 5
Thursday
POETRY READING
Reading in the last program for the year is the winner of the 2002 Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 8 p.m. Public contact: 707-5394.

December 7
Saturday
CHILDREN’S AFRICANA BOOK AWARDS
The African and Middle Eastern Division and the African Studies Association co-sponsor the Children’s Africana Book Awards ceremony in the Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 10 a.m. Public contact: 707-1960.

December 18
Wednesday
CONCERT
The Juilliard and Avalon string quartets perform works by Beethoven, Cycle (Part 1), String Quartet, op. 18, no.1; Seeger, String Quartet; and Mendelssohn’s Octet in E-flat Major, op. 20; in the Coolidge Auditorium of the Jefferson Building at 8 p.m. Tickets available Nov. 6 for a nominal service charge from TicketMaster; call (301) 808-6900; (410) 752-1200; or (800) 551- 7328. Public contact: 707-5502.

December 25
Wednesday
CHRISTMAS DAY
All Library of Congress facilities closed.

The Library of Congress occupies three buildings on Capitol Hill. The Thomas Jefferson Building is the original Library of Congress building; it is located at 10 First St. S.E. across from the U.S. Capitol. The John Adams Building is directly behind the Jefferson Building to the east on Second St. S.E.; and the James Madison Memorial Building, at 101 Independence Ave. S.E., is just south of the Jefferson Building.

Persons attending events at the Library should allow extra time in order to pass through Library security.

Request ADA accommodations five days in advance at 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

FILMS: Reservations may be made by phone, beginning one week before any given show. Call 707-5677 during business hours (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Reserved seats must be claimed at least 10 minutes before showtime, after which standbys will be admitted to unclaimed seats. All programs are free, but seating is limited to 64 seats. More information on the individual films is available on the Library’s Web site at www.loc.gov/rr/mopic/pickford/2002-archive.html.

CONCERTS: Tickets are required for all Library of Congress concerts. They are available five weeks ahead of the event for a nominal charge of $2 per ticket (maximum of two tickets per person), with additional charges for phone orders and handling, from TicketMaster by calling (301) 808-6900, (410) 752-1200, (800) 551-7328 or by visiting TicketMaster outlets. Tickets for popular events are claimed quickly, but there are often empty seats at concert time. Interested patrons are encouraged to try for standby seats by appearing at the will-call desk by 6:30 p.m. on concert evenings. All concerts will be held in the Coolidge Auditorium, located on the ground floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street S.E., at 8 p.m., unless otherwise noted.

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PR 02-111
09/12/02
ISSN 0731-3527

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