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The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > Internet Resources - Special Topics
  • African-American Newspapers and Periodicals: Freedom’s Journal — The Wisconsin Historical Society presents digitized copies of the first African-American owned and operated newspaper in the United States.
    http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/libraryarchives/aanp/freedom/
  • American Indian Issues: An Introductory and Curricular Guide for Educators — Humboldt State University presents this excellent resource, with a historical overview and timeline, plus complete instructional units and mini-lessons.
    http://users.humboldt.edu/ogayle/kellogg/NativeRelationship.html
  • American Jewish Historical Society — Features an online archive of documents plus more than 100 brief articles on topics and people in American Jewish history (e.g., the fight for Jewish chaplains in the armed forces, the lynching of Leo Frank, Justice Cardozo and American Zionism).
    http://www.ajhs.org/index.cfm
  • Anacostia Community Museum — Peruse online exhibits and listen to talks by experts in African American history and preservation of historic materials.
    http://anacostia.si.edu/
  • Asian Nation: Asian American History, Demographics, and Issues — Several interesting articles and bibliographies on the history of Asian Americans. From UMass professor C.N. Le.
    http://www.asian-nation.org/first.shtml
  • Avalon Project: Major Collections — Scanning the list of major collections of primary sources at this site reveals collections on African-Americans, Native Americans and their relationship with the United States, slavery, and human rights.
    http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/major.asp
  • Becoming American: The Chinese Experience — The companion site to the Bill Moyers special on PBS provides background information, educational materials, and the opportunity for users to submit their own stories.
    http://www.pbs.org/becomingamerican/index.html
  • The Black Past — The subtitle of this site describes it well — “An Online Reference Guide to African American History.” From Professor Quintard Taylor at the University of Washington.
    http://www.blackpast.org/
  • Chinese American Contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad — Extensive site from the Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum that pays tribute to Chinese contributions to the building of the American transcontinental railroad.
    http://cprr.org/Museum/Chinese.html
  • Cultural Heritage Initiative for Community Outreach — This University of Michigan project presents several exhibits related to multicultural history, including The Harlem Renaissance and Great Lakes Powwows.
    http://www2.si.umich.edu/chico/
  • The Curtis Collection — A gateway to the work of Edward Sheriff Curtis, who photographed some 80 Indian nations from 1890 to 1930.
    http://www.curtis-collection.com/curtis/default.asp?page=
  • Densho Educational Website — Excellent print material on the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, plus an archive of videotaped oral histories with Japanese Americans who experienced the internment.
    http://www.densho.org/densho.asp
  • Digital Schomburg: Images of African Americans from the 19th Century — The New York Public Library presents engravings, photographs, reproductions of newspaper pages and postcards, and other visuals portraying African American life in the 1800s. One excellent exhibit is In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience, which provides documents, analysis, and lesson plans.
    http://digital.nypl.org/schomburg/images_aa19/
  • A Durable Memento — A fascinating look at the life and work of an African American daguerrotypist, Augustus Washington, in the 19th century.
    http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/awash/index.htm
  • Ethnic America — Digital History (a project of the University of Houston and the Gilder Lehrman Institute) presents a number of essays on ethnicity in American history, with particular emphasis on immigration.
    http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/ethnic_am.cfm
  • Events in Hispanic American History — This timeline from the publisher Thomson Gale spans the years from 1492 to the present.
    http://www.gale.com/free_resources/chh/timeline/
  • Explorations in Black Leadership — The Institute for Public History at the University of Virginia provides videotaped interviews with more than 30 important black Americans. Learning activities about leadership and the civil rights movement are also provided.
    http://www.virginia.edu/publichistory/bl/index.php
  • Facing History and Ourselves — Lessons on the civil rights movement, including the integration of the Little Rock schools, are provided on this site, which also provides an array of other resources.
    http://www.facinghistory.org/resources
  • From Haven to Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America — An exhibition of more than 300 objects from the collections of the Library of Congress.
    http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/haventohome/
  • Harlem History — Varied source materials on the arts and culture, neighborhood, and politics of Harlem, home to numerous ethnic groups throughout its history. From Columbia University.
    http://www.columbia.edu/cu/iraas/harlem/index.html
  • Harlem Hospital WPA Murals — A fascinating look at the WPA and attitudes toward African American artists in the 1930s.
    http://www.columbia.edu/cu/iraas/wpa/murals/index.html
  • Heritage Teaching Resources — The Smithsonian presents a variety of resources for teaching about Hispanic, African American, Asian Pacific, and American Indian heritage.
    http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/resource_library/
    heritage_resources.html
  • Hispanic Reading Room — The Library of Congress presents several online collections related to the history of Hispanics in the Americas.
    http://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/onlinecol.html
  • Homecoming... Sometimes I Am Haunted by Memories of Red Dirt and Clay — The story of African-American land loss and a chronicle of black farmers from the Civil War to the present.
    http://www.pbs.org/itvs/homecoming/
  • Hmong Field Guide — Extensive resource on America's internment camps during World War II.
    http://www.madisonchildrensmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/HMONG-FIELD-GUIDE-DOC.pdf
  • Images of the Antislavery Movement in Massachusetts — This site presents more than 800 images - photographs, paintings, banners, broadsides, and more - related to the abolitionist movement.
    http://www.masshist.org/online/abolition.cfm
  • Immigrant and Ethnic America — This site presents archival material from Harper's Weekly, with a particular focus on the Chinese-American experience from 1857-1892.
    http://immigrants.harpweek.com/
  • Immigrant and Ethnic History — Diane Vecchio of Furman University provides this article of interest to history teachers. Other germane full-text articles can be found by searching at the History Cooperative.
    http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ht/37.4/vecchio.html
  • I’ve Known Rivers — The Museum of the African Diaspora provides first-person narratives by people of African descent and their experiences.
    http://www.iveknownrivers.org/
  • Japanese American Internment — Provides links to resources on the American Internment Camps established during World War II.
    http://www.pbs.org/childofcamp/history/index.html
  • Japanese American Network: History — This site provides a brief timeline of events in Japanese American history, plus links to other sites on the topic.
    http://www.janet.org/janet_history/ja_history.html
  • The Jewish Americans — Accompanying site to the three-part PBS series covering 350 years of Jewish-American history. Lesson plans for use with the series are provided.
    http://www.pbs.org/jewishamericans/index.html
  • Jewish Life in the American West: Generation to Generation — A museum exhibition emphasizing the contributions of Jewish Americans to Western communities.
    http://www.autrynationalcenter.org/jewish_life/
  • Latino Series — WGBH offers a data base of lectures on Latinos and their lives in America.
    http://forum-network.org/series/latino-culture-series
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute — This center at Stanford provides curriculum and primary sources about King and the civil rights movement.
    http://www.stanford.edu/group/King/liberation_curriculum/
  • Mary McLeod Bethune Council House: African American Women Unite for Change — This site is part of the National Park Service’s excellent Teaching with Historic Places project and focuses on the work done by the National Council of Negro Women in the mid-20th century.
    http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/135bethune/135bethune.htm
  • Maynard Institute History Project — Interviews with African-American journalists trace efforts to integrate newsrooms in the United States.
    http://www.mije.org/black_journalists_movement
  • Mexican Migration Project — Research study of Mexican migration to the United States provides socioeconomic data on the migrant population, statistics, oral histories, and a gallery of retablos.
    http://mmp.opr.princeton.edu/
  • National Civil Rights Museum — Offers background on people and events important in the Civil Rights Movement.
    http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/
  • National Museum of the American Indian — A new museum honoring the history and culture of Native Americans.
    http://www.nmai.si.edu/
  • National Museum of American Jewish History — Offers visitors the opportunity to learn about American Jews in the social, cultural, economic, and political life of this nation.
    http://www.nmajh.org/
  • Native American Cultures — Scholastic, in partnership with Earthwatch, provides this interactive site that teaches students about canyon rock art, prehistoric pueblos and other aspects of historic Native American cultures.
    http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/explorer/native_americans/
  • Picturing the Cayuse, Walla Walla, and Umatilla Tribes — The University of Oregon presents 7000 photographs of three tribes taken by Lee Moorhouse, an Indian agent, from 1888 to 1916.
    http://boundless.uoregon.edu/digcol/mh/project.html
  • Powerful Days in Black and White — An incredible collection of photographs taken by Charles Moore during the Civil Rights Movement.
    http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/features/moore/mooreIndex.shtml
  • Remembering Jim Crow — American RadioWorks and Minnesota Public Radio present oral history interviews, photographs, and text documenting segregation, its effects, and the ways in which African Americans both resisted it and succeeded despite it.
    http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/remembering/
  • San Diego's Mexican and Chicano History — A detailed look at the history of Mexicans/Chicanos in southern California. While authors Richard Griswold del Castillo, Isidro Ortiz, and Rosalinda Gonzalez examine local history, the story has much to offer in the larger context of U.S. history.
    http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/dept/mas/chicanohistory/index.html
  • Story Corps Griot — This ongoing project is collecting and making available oral histories with African Americans.
    http://www.storycorps.net/special-initiatives/griot
  • Thomas Day Education Project — Lesson plans, a teacher network, and workshops are among the resources from this project dedicated to improving the teaching of African-American history.
    http://www.thomasday.net/
  • Through the Lens of Time: Images of African Americans — Approximately 300 historic photographs of African Americans, taken in the 19th century and first half of the 20th century.
    http://dig.library.vcu.edu/cdm4/index_cook.php?CISOROOT=/cook
  • Traditions of the Sun: Chaco Canyon National Historical Park — Explore the ruins of the civilization that flourished at Chaco Canyon hundreds of years before European exploration and learn about its culture and scientific achievements in this multimedia site.
    http://www.traditionsofthesun.org

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