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The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > US History
  • Africans in America: Revolution, 1750-1830 — An illustrated narrative about the period, a resource bank containing biographies, primary sources, commentary from modern historians, and a teacher’s guide. A companion to the PBS series.
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/title.html
  • The American War of Independence — A look at the Revolutionary War from the British perspective.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/empire_seapower/rebels_redcoats_01.shtml
  • Benjamin Franklin: An Extraordinary Life, An Electric Mind — An in-depth look at the life of one of the great colonial leaders.
    http://www.pbs.org/benfranklin/
  • Colonial Broadsides and the American Revolution — A document-based lesson plan from Edsitement.
    http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=390
  • The Coming of the American Revolution — The Massachusetts Historical Society presents lessons, biographies, primary sources, and analysis on the events leading up to the American Revolution.
    http://www.masshist.org/revolution/
  • Correspondence Between John and Abigail Adams — The letters of this founding couple include many written while John was in attendance at the Continental Congress.
    http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/aea/letter/
  • Declaration of Independence — A scan of the original document, plus a transcript and several articles about the Declaration.
    http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration.html
  • Declare the Causes: The Declaration of Independence — An eight-lesson unit on the Declaration.
    http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=282
  • Famous American Trials: Boston Massacre Trial — Professor Douglas Linder of the University of Missouri Kansas City presents a chronology, eyewitness accounts, and excerpts from speeches about the case.
    http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/bostonmassacre/bostonmassacre.html
  • Freedom Trail Foundation — A website about the many historic sites that make up Boston’s Freedom Trail.
    http://www.thefreedomtrail.org
  • Frontier Forts in the American Revolution — An interesting look at the role of frontier forts, written specifically for younger students.
    http://www.teachersfirst.com/lessons/forts/index.htm
  • George Washington's Mount Vernon — Historic information about Washington's home, plus a virtual tour of the mansion.
    http://www.mountvernon.org/
  • Historic Valley Forge — The history of Valley Forge, along with extensive information about who served there.
    http://www.ushistory.org/valleyforge/
  • "I Cannot Tell a Lie" — The subtitle of this lesson plan—“Examining Myths in American History”—from The New York Times captures its purpose. Myths about the American Revolution are a major focus.
    http://www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/lessons/20030630monday.html
  • Images of the American Revolution — Eight primary sources, including a painting of Benjamin Franklin at the court of France, Benedict Arnold's loyalty oath, and the signature page of the Treaty of Paris, serve as the centerpiece for this lesson from the National Archives.
    http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/revolution-images/
  • Independence Day — Education World provides a series of articles, teaching ideas, and book reviews on the colonies’ declaration of independence from Britain.
    http://www.education-world.com/holidays/archives/independence.shtml
  • Jefferson and Madison — This site from C-SPAN draws on clips from its American Writers series to help students examine the process of writing the Declaration, the context in which it was written, and the influences on Jefferson.
    http://www.americanwriters.org/classroom/videolesson/vlp04_jeffmad.asp
  • John Adams — This site supports the HBO series on the second president, but it also includes a student “magazine” on Adams that would be useful without the series.
    http://www.hbo.com/films/johnadams/
  • Lafayette: Citizen of Two Worlds — Cornell University prepared this exhibit to mark the 20th anniversary of Lafayette’s birth. The exhibit features documents, artwork, artifacts, and analysis.
    http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/lafayette/index.html
  • Legacy: Spain and the United States in the Age of Independence — This site from the Smithsonian examines the relationship between the two nations, beginning in 1763 and continuing to 1848.
    http://latino.si.edu/SpainLegacy/Archive/index.html
  • Liberty! The American Revolution — Useful background information on the Revolution, plus a timeline and game. A related site includes scholarly essays on the Revolution. The official Web site of the 1997 PBS series.
    http://www.pbs.org/ktca/liberty/
  • The Marquis de Lafayette Collection — Cleveland State University provides primary sources and essays about the French general whose aid was critical to U.S. success in the Revolution.
    http://web.ulib.csuohio.edu/Lafayette/
  • Online Bookshelves: Revolutionary War — The U.S. Army Center of Military History provides several articles on the military history of the Revolution.
    http://www.history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/rw.html
  • Our Documents: Articles of Confederation — A brief introduction, an image of the original, and a transcript of our nation's first “constitution.”
    http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=3
  • Papers of George Washington — Selected Washington papers, plus lessons and scholarly articles on various aspects of the first president's life and career. From the University of Virginia.
    http://gwpapers.virginia.edu/
  • The Paul Revere House — A virtual tour of Revere’s “Midnight ride,” along with other information about the patriot’s life.
    http://www.paulreverehouse.org/
  • Rare Maps Collection: Revolutionary America — Fifteen historic maps of the American Revolution from the University of Georgia Hargrett Library.
    http://www.libs.uga.edu/darchive/hargrett/maps/revamer.html
  • Red Hill: Patrick Henry National Memorial — A biography, historical information, and links related to the “Voice of the Revolution.”
    http://www.redhill.org/
  • Reexamining the Revolution — Teacher Ray Raphael examines myths about the revolutionary era and the ways in which textbooks perpetuate those myths.
    http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/19_02/revo192.shtml
  • Revolutionary America. 1763-1789 — The Hoover Presidential Library presents this exhibit on the revolutionary era.
    http://hoover.archives.gov/exhibits/RevAmerica/index.html
  • Spy Letters of the American Revolution — A fascinating collection of letters sent by or confiscated by spies during the Revolution. From the University of Michigan Clements Library.
    http://www2.si.umich.edu/spies/index-gallery.html
  • Teaching American History Document Library: Founding Era — Provides documents from many of the Founders, including John Adams, Abigail Adams, Ben Franklin, Thomas Paine, Patrick Henry, and George Washington.
    http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?category=1
  • Teaching with Historic Places: Independence Day — The National Register of Historic Places presents eight lessons focused on historic places important in the battle for independence (e.g., Bunker Hill, Guilford Courthouse).
    http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/twhp/jul00.htm
  • Thomas Jefferson — This site supports the Ken Burns film on the author of the Declaration of Independence and includes classroom activities and photo essays representing the meaning of the phrase “the pursuit of happiness.”
    http://www.pbs.org/jefferson/
  • Thomas Paine — A brief biography and four of the works written by Paine in the Revolutionary Era and after.
    http://www.ushistory.org/paine/
  • USHistory.org — Calling itself a “Congress of Websites,” this site from the Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia provides a wealth of information on the Revolutionary era, highlighting Pennsylvania and Philadelphia.
    http://www.ushistory.org/
  • Was the American Revolution a Revolution? — The University of Groningen in the Netherlands provides this interesting look at the American Revolution.
    http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/E/revolution/revoxx.htm
  • Washington Monument: Tribute in Stone — This lesson plan helps students explore the leadership qualities of George Washington.
    http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/62wash/62wash.htm

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