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The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > US History
  • Aboard the Underground Railroad: A National Register Travel Itinerary — Background on the Underground Railroad, highlighting sites where escaped slaves gained sanctuary on their journey north.
    http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/underground/
  • Abolition — A special issue of the Gilder Lehrman Institute’s online journal History Now, focusing on the abolitionist movement beginning in the 1830s and 1840s.
    http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-now/2005-09/abolition
  • Africans in America: Judgment Day, 1831-1865 — An illustrated narrative about the period, a resource bank containing biographies, primary sources, commentary from modern historians, and a teacher's guide. The companion to the PBS series.
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/title.html
  • The Alamo — Information about the battle and the Revolution, plus letters from soldiers in the garrison.
    http://www.thealamo.org/
  • American Cultural History: The Nineteenth Century — Decade by decade analysis of cultural trends, from the Kingwood College Library.
    http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/19thcentury.html
  • An American Family: The Beecher Tradition — This site based on an exhibit at the Newman Library examines the history of this eminent 19th-century family and how it was inextricably linked to the larger events of U.S. history.
    http://newman.baruch.cuny.edu/digital/2001/beecher/default.htm
  • American President: An Online Reference Resource — The Miller Center at the University of Virginia presents detailed information on all the presidents of the era, from James Madison to James K. Polk.
    http://millercenter.org/academic/americanpresident/
  • Andrew Jackson: "Champion of the Kingly Commons" — This site explores how Andrew Jackson became a mythic figure, representing an entire era of American history. From the University of Virginia.
    http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CAP/jackson/jackson.html
  • Art, Artists and History: The Hudson River School — Teacher resources on the painters who established the first tradition of landscape painting in the United States.
    http://www.albanyinstitute.org/Education/Hudson%20River%20School/hrs.htm
  • California’s Untold Stories: Gold Rush! — A curriculum guide, paintings of the gold rush, information about archaeological digs at gold rush sites, and lots of information about the California Gold Rush.
    http://www.museumca.org/goldrush/
  • Changing Landscapes: Slave Housing at Monticello — A fascinating look at changes in the conditions in which slaves lived in the early 19th century. By Fraser Nieman, Director of Archeology for the Thomas Jefferson Foundation.
    http://www.pbs.org/saf/14_1301/features/archeology.htm
  • Common-place: The Interactive Journal of Early American Life — The American Antiquarian Society and the Gilder Lehrman Institute have designed the quarterly Common-place to be scholarly but friendly. Topics related to the first half of the 19th century include slavery, the legal relationship between the U.S. government and Native Americans, and antebellum photographs of African Americans.
    http://www.common-place.org/
  • Created Equal: Women's Rights National Historical Park — Information on the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, including the official report from the convention, and on leaders of the convention.
    http://www.nps.gov/wori/index.htm
  • Death or Liberty: Gabriel, Nat Turner and John Brown — This site documents resistance to slavery, particularly highlighting the rebellions led by the three individuals named in the site’s title. From the Library of Virginia.
    http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whoweare/exhibits/deathliberty/
  • Democracy in America: Alexis DeTocqueville — An excellent exploration of DeTocqueville’s writing and the America he encountered in 1831.
    http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/home.html
  • The Diaries of John Quincy Adams — This site makes available the 14,000 pages of diary entries that the sixth President wrote from the age of 12 until his death in 1848.
    http://www.masshist.org/jqadiaries/
  • Dred Scott Case — A chronology and primary sources on this pivotal case. From Washington University in St. Louis.
    http://library.wustl.edu/vlib/dredscott/
  • Getting the Message Out! — This site presents campaign materials or the years 1840-1860; essays and lesson plans are also included.
    http://dig.lib.niu.edu/message/
  • Godey's Lady’s Book On-Line — Several complete issues of the popular women's magazine from 1850, featuring fashions, poetry, engravings, and articles.
    http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/godey/index.html
  • Exploring Amistad — Mystic Seaport provides primary sources and teaching suggestions on the Amistad case, which sparked debate on the slave trade and slavery.
    http://www.mysticseaport.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.viewPage&page_id=E34E80E5-A366-D9FD-B8C506D310A9DA0B
  • James Monroe’s Ash Lawn-Highland — This site provides a biography and timeline on the fifth president, as well as information on his home.
    http://www.ashlawnhighland.org/
  • Land of Golden Dreams: California in the Gold Rush Decade, 1848-1858 — A multifaceted site with background, lesson plans, and a simulation from the Huntington Library.
    http://www.huntington.org/Education/GoldRush/index.html
  • The Marshall Court, 1801-1835 — The Supreme Court Historical Society provides an overview of Chief Justice Marshall’s tenure, which included many of the Court's historic early decisions.
    http://www.supremecourthistory.org/?s=The+Marshall+Court%2C+1801-1835
  • McCulloch v. Maryland — Street Law and the Supreme Court Historical Society present teaching materials on this early landmark decision related to the powers of the federal government.
    http://www.landmarkcases.org/mcculloch/home.html
  • The Monroe Doctrine: Origin and Early American Foreign Policy — A four-lesson document-based unit on the Monroe Doctrine; from the humanities web site Edsitement.
    http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=574
  • Old Sturbridge Village — Take a virtual tour of a New England village of the 1830s, complete with animations showing how technologies of the time worked. A historian answers questions online as well.
    http://www.osv.org/
  • Oregon Trail — Background information, commentary from historians, and excerpts from diaries and memoirs are features of this website from professors Mike Trinklein and Steve Boettcher of Idaho State University.
    http://www.isu.edu/%7Etrinmich/Oregontrail.html
  • Slave Narratives — The Museum of the African Diaspora presents excerpts from narratives by nine former slaves, with narration by Maya Angelou.
    http://moadsf.org/salon/exhibits/slave_narratives/flash.php
  • Symposium: 150th Anniversary of Dred Scott — Chicago Kent College of Law presents the proceedings of a symposium on the significance of what one author calls “the court’s most dreadful case.”
    http://cklawreview.com/issues/past/vol-82-no-1/
  • Take a Hike with Henry — Educators Linda Joseph and Linda Resch have created this site about Henry David Thoreau, using the children's book Henry Hikes to Fitchburg, by D. B. Johnson, as a starting point. Numerous activities and excellent background on Thoreau written so elementary-age children can appreciate this American thinker.
    http://www.cyberbee.com/henryhikes/henry.html
  • Teaching American History Document Library: Expansion Era — Documents from such figures of the era as Andrew Jackson, Henry Clay, and Daniel Webster.
    http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/index.asp?category=6
  • Thar’s Gold in Them Thar Hills — Primary sources on the Georgia Gold Rush from the Digital Library of Georgia.
    http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/dahlonega/
  • Trail of Tears — Good set of links to resources on the removal of the Cherokee Nation to Indian Territory. From the Georgia Digital Library.
    http://georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/trailtea.htm
  • Trail of Tears Research — The Sequoyah Research Center presents eyewitness accounts, a timeline, and other resources on the Trail of Tears.
    http://anpa.ualr.edu/trail_of_tears/indian_removal_project/indian_removal.htm
  • The U.S.-Mexican War — Multiple viewpoints on the war, along with a timeline, discussion forum, and resources. The companion to the PBS/KERA program.
    http://www.pbs.org/kera/usmexicanwar/
  • The U.S.-Mexican War — Documents, maps, and images related to the 1848 conflict. From the Descendants of Mexican War Veterans.
    http://www.dmwv.org/mexwar/mexwar1.htm
  • Web of American Transcendentalism — Extensive collection of biographies, primary sources, and essays on the philosophical and literary movement known as transcendentalism.
    http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/transcendentalism/
  • Westward Expansion [PDF-312 KB] — The Environmental Literacy Council provides this high school unit that “traces the push of settlers into the West and the impact of settlement policies, the railroad, and the allocation of natural resource rights.”
    http://www.enviroliteracy.org/nehmod/WestwardExpansion-FINAL.pdf

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