Library of Congress

Teachers

The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > Humanities
  • American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages — This professional association presents white papers on language teaching, information on the standards for foreign language learning, and links to language-specific organizations.
    http://www.actfl.org/
  • American Rhetoric — An interesting site with many examples from speeches as well as background on rhetoric.
    http://www.americanrhetoric.com/index.htm
  • Ask a Linguist — Sponsored by Eastern Michigan University, provides a place to ask questions on language or linguistics.
    http://linguistlist.org/ask-ling/index.html
  • BBC Online: Languages — The BBC provides online beginners’ courses, such background information as holiday phrases in 34 languages, and learning games.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/
  • British Library Learning: Language and Literature — Among the topics explored on this page are “Changing Language,” “Texts in Context,” and “Dictionaries and Meanings.”
    http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/index.html
  • Center for Applied Linguistics — Learn about the many services and products of this center dedicated to improving the teaching and learning of language and culture.
    http://www.cal.org/
  • Center for Language Education and Research — Tools for language instruction, as well as an online journal on language learning and technology. Links to other language resource centers are also provided. From Michigan State University.
    http://clear.msu.edu/clear/
  • Content-Based Language Teaching with Technology — The Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition at the University of Minnesota presents teacher-developed lessons and units that enhance students’ language acquisition and content knowledge.
    http://www.carla.umn.edu/cobaltt/index.html
  • Directory of State Humanities Councils — Find out what’s happening at your state’s humanities council through this directory provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities.
    http://edsitement.neh.gov/
  • Do You Speak American? — This site from PBS explores the state of American English—its variations, how it unites and divides, and how it changes.
    http://www.pbs.org/speak/
  • Endangered Languages — Interesting articles on living, endangered, and extinct languages.
    http://www.yourdictionary.com/elr/index.html
  • The Evolution of Languages — The Exploratorium presents information on the history of languages, along with activities to engage young people in studying words and their origins.
    http://www.exploratorium.edu/exploring/language/
  • Foreign Languages and Literatures — Through its Open Courseware project, MIT presents course materials from more than 100 courses.
    http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Foreign-Languages-and-Literatures/index.htm
  • A Glossary of Rhetorical Terms with Examples — 45 terms defined and illustrated. Maintained by the University of Kentucky.
    http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html
  • I Love Languages — Subtitled “Your Guide to Languages on the Web,” this site provides extensive links.
    http://www.ilovelanguages.com/
  • Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities — This project at the University of Virginia hosts a number of primary source collections, as well as the journal Postmodern Culture.
    http://www.iath.virginia.edu/
  • Internet Public Library Exhibit Hall — Several humanities-based exhibits that include background information and primary sources. Example topics include quilting, Egyptian forgeries, music history, and Pueblo pottery.
    http://www.ipl.org/div/exhibit/
  • Language and Culture: An Introduction to Human Communication — The title of this site describes well the tutorial developed by professor Dennis O’Neil of Palomar College. Links and a glossary are also provided.
    http://anthro.palomar.edu/language/default.htm
  • Language and Linguistics: A Special Report — The National Science Foundation presents this site exploring language learning, language change, and endangered languages, among other topics.
    http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/linguistics/index.jsp
  • LearningLanguages.net — A portal for English-speakers looking for resources on learning and teaching foreign languages. From the Internet Scout Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    http://www.language-learning.net/
  • Library of Congress Exhibitions — These permanent exhibits touch on many humanities topics; examples include Japanese wood block prints, Margaret Mead's work on the power of culture, African-American culture and history, the comic strips of Chic Young, French culture, and Bob Hope and variety theater.
    http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/
  • LingNet — Hosted by the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, this site presents links to sites on virtually any language, discussion forums, readings, and more.
    http://www.lingnet.org/
  • Linguist List — Numerous links related to language and language analysis, a discussion list, and an ask-a-linguist feature.
    http://linguistlist.org/
  • Literacy Matters — This site from the Education Development Center provides resources for developing competence with language across the curriculum.
    http://www.literacymatters.com/
  • Materials for Teaching and Learning Languages — Eva B. Easton maintains this large and useful set of links. The site also presents numerous quotes about the importance of learning languages.
    http://eleaston.com/languages.html
  • National Center for Cultural Competence — While this center at Georgetown University aims primarily to help health care providers offer culturally sensitive services, it provides an interesting perspective on cultural and linguistic competence.
    http://www11.georgetown.edu/research/gucchd/nccc/index.html
  • National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition — This clearinghouse at George Washington University “collects, analyzes, synthesizes and disseminates information about language instruction educational programs for English language learners.”
    http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/
  • National Endowment for the Humanities — This federal government site presents links to NEH-supported exhibits and educational projects, as well as a special site for teachers, cleverly titled Edsitement.
    http://www.neh.gov/
  • Omniglot: Writing Systems and Languages of the World — This site provides information about more than 150 writing systems, plus articles on an array of topics related to language.
    http://www.omniglot.com/
  • Oral Tradition Journal — This online periodical explores the relationship between oral traditions and culture.
    http://journal.oraltradition.org/
  • Outreach World — This site provides resources for educators who want to each K-12 students about languages and culture. Among the resources provided are literature-based units and travel reports from teachers.
    http://www.outreachworld.org/index.asp
  • Read, Write, Think — The International Reading Association, National Council for Teachers of English, and Marco Polo present lessons for “learning language, learning about language, and learning through language.”
    http://www.readwritethink.org/
  • SEASite — The Center for Southeast Asian Studies at Northern Illinois University presents language instruction materials and background on Southeast Asian cultures.
    http://www.seasite.niu.edu/
  • SIL International — This organization, whose mission is “to study, develop and document the world’s lesser-known languages,” provides information about language learning and the Ethnologue, a database of information on more than 6,800 languages.
    http://www.sil.org/
  • Teaching Foreign Languages K-12 Workshop — Annenberg presents this eight-session online workshop designed to help teachers “understand and apply current research in foreign language education to evaluate your teaching practice.”
    http://www.learner.org/channel/workshops/tfl/
  • United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization — Information about World Heritage Sites, the relationships between culture and development, cultural preservation, and more.
    http://portal.unesco.org/
  • Welcome to Zon — This site from Professor Yong Zhao at Michigan State University features an online game that introduces players to Chinese language and culture.
    http://enterzon.com/
  • What Is Folklore? — The New York Folklore Society provides numerous definitions of folklore and the related terms, folk art and folklife. An interesting starting point for exploring these ideas.
    http://www.nyfolklore.org/resource/what.html
  • World Wise Schools: Publications — This Peace Corps site presents a workbook and teacher’s guide for teaching about fundamentals of culture and cross-cultural communication.
    http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/publications/
  • Worldview — Chicago Public Radio produces this program, which covers a wide array of topics. Examples include how language is changing around the globe, the “information wars,” and the politics of travel.
    http://www.wbez.org/worldview
  • World Wide Words — Subtitled “investigating international English from a British viewpoint,” this site provides fascinating background on the language, with special attention to slang and new words. Webmaster and lexicographer Michael Quinion also provides a free weekly newsletter.
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/

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