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The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > Government
  • America.gov: U.S. Government — Articles and background on the U.S. system, provided by the U.S. Department of State.
    http://uspolitics.america.gov/uspolitics/government/index.html
  • American Presidency Project — The University of California, Santa Barbara hosts this site that presents nearly 80,000 primary sources related to the presidency.
    http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/index.php
  • Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids — An introduction to the government for students, adapted for various grade levels. Also includes a list of “U.S. Government Websites for Kids.”
    http://bensguide.gpo.gov/
  • Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 to Present — A searchable database of information about those who have served in the U.S. Congress and the Continental Congress.
    http://bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp
  • CQ Roll Call Daily Briefing — Congressional Quarterly’s site provides weekly analysis of key votes in Congress.
    http://corporate.cqrollcall.com/content/4/en/CQ_Roll_Call_Daily_Briefing
  • Center on Congress — Directed by former Congressman Lee Hamilton, this Indiana University center provides information for adults and young people about the operation of Congress.
    http://congress.indiana.edu/
  • Congressional Budget Office — Numerous reports analyzing aspects of the federal budget.
    http://www.cbo.gov/
  • Congressional Research Tutorials — The University of California at Berkeley libraries help users find their way through the plethora of resources on Congress.
    http://sunsite3.berkeley.edu/wikis/congresearch/
  • Congress.org — Extensive information about Congress, as well as a mechanism for sending letters to members of Congress and posting them on this site. From Capitol Advantage.
    http://congress.org/congressorg/home/
  • Council on Foreign Relations: Daily Analysis — Analysis of current foreign relations issues; in September 2008 issues considered include Turkey’s efforts to build new strategic alliances, Pakistan’s relationship with China, and the financial crisis on Wall Street.
    http://www.cfr.org/publication/by_type/daily_analysis.html
  • Democracy in America — Annenberg presents this online video course for high school teachers, covering such topics as federalism, the presidency, and the bureaucracy.
    http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/democracyinamerica/
  • Dirksen Congressional Center — Interactive games for young people, an online module to help teachers understand and teach about Congress, and information about Congress and its activities.
    http://www.dirksencongressionalcenter.org/
  • Federal Resources for Educational Excellence — Links to web resources supported by U.S. government agencies and useful to educators.
    http://www.free.ed.gov/
  • FedStats — Data from more than 100 agencies of the federal government.
    http://www.fedstats.gov/
  • FedWorld — One-stop location for access to government information. From the National Technical Information Service, Department of Commerce.
    http://www.fedworld.gov/
  • First Ladies: Political Role and Public Image — A & E Television provides a curriculum unit looking at the role played by First Ladies as unofficial members of their husbands' administrations.
    http://www.aetv.com/class/firstladies/
  • Foreign Relations of the United States — The official documentary historical record of major foreign policy decisions.
    http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/FRUS/
  • GovExec.com — The online version of the journal Government Executive, which is targeted at managers in the federal government, whose mission is to “cover the business of the federal government and its huge departments and agencies.”
    http://www.govexec.com/
  • GovSpot.com — A portal for information from and about governments at the local, state, national, and international levels. A service of StartSport Mediaworks.
    http://govspot.com/
  • GPO Access — Links to numerous government resources and a list of depository libraries, at which federal documents are available. Featured in September 2008: a mid-year review of the state of federal expenditures.
    http://www.gpoaccess.gov/
  • High School Curriculum on the Judiciary — Lessons on the justice system from the American Judicature Society.
    http://www.ajs.org/hsc/
  • How the Electoral College Works — The “How Stuff Works” site presents this article on the U.S. system of electing the president.
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/electoral-college.htm
  • LegSim Instructional Resources — Links and sample resources for teaching about the legislative process, from the fee-based LegSim virtual legislature project.
    http://legsim.ecampaigntrail.com/students/resources/
  • LII Bulletin — The Legal Information Institute at Cornell provides Supreme Court previews and, at the end of the term, “highlights” of the Court’s work.
    http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/cert
  • The National Archives and Records Administration — Resource for teachers and students of government and political science. Links from the Presidential Libraries section allows user to connect to websites of the individual libraries.
    http://www.archives.gov/
  • No Child Left Behind — The U.S. Department of Education's page on the important education bill enacted in 2002.
    http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml?src=fb
  • Oyez: U.S. Supreme Court Multimedia — Information on current and selected past Supreme Court cases, with more than 2000 hours of sound recordings of the court's proceedings.
    http://www.oyez.org/
  • POTUS: Presidents of the United States — Background information, election results, cabinet members, and links for all the presidents. A service of the Internet Public Library.
    http://www.ipl.org/div/potus/
  • Presidential $1 Coin Lesson Plans — The Mint provides a series of lesson plans on the new dollar coins that will eventually feature all U.S. presidents.
    http://www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/features/2007/02.cfm
  • The Supreme Court — This special issue of the Gilder Lehrman Institute’s online journal History Now includes scholarly articles written for teachers, lesson plans, teacher-written book reviews, and a list of 15 Supreme Court cases every student should know.
    http://www.gilderlehrman.org/search/gli_search/The%20Supreme%20Court
  • Supreme Court Historical Society — Explore the history of the U.S. Supreme Court at this site.
    http://www.supremecourthistory.org/
  • Supreme Court Online — Duke University Law School provides “plain-English” coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court.
    http://www.law.duke.edu/publiclaw/supremecourtonline/index.html
  • Supreme Court Preview — The American Bar Association presents information on how the Court works and upcoming cases to be heard by the Court.
    http://www.abanet.org/publiced/preview/
  • Supreme Court of the United States — The website of the nation’s top court, featuring transcripts of oral arguments made available the same day the arguments are heard in court.
    http://www.supremecourtus.gov/
  • THOMAS — Online access to Congressional information. Included are the full text of current legislation, the Congressional Record from the 101st Congress to the present, the status of pending bills, and more. Most resources are searchable by keyword. Developed by the Library of Congress.
    http://thomas.loc.gov/
  • University of Michigan Documents Center — Publications and documents from the government, plus links to information on all levels of government.
    http://www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/
  • USA.gov — A one-stop portal for federal government information from the General Services Administration.
    http://www.usa.gov
  • U.S. Courts — Information on the federal courts, statements by federal jurists, FAQs about the courts, educational materials, and links to other sources.
    http://www.uscourts.gov/
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security — Users can learn more about the newest Cabinet-level department at its home page.
    http://www.dhs.gov/index.shtm
  • U.S. House of Representatives — Information about current legislation, committees and committee assignments, and the home pages of current Representatives.
    http://www.house.gov/
  • U.S. Senate — Information about current legislation, committees and committee assignments, and the home pages of current Senators.
    http://www.senate.gov/
  • White House — Background information on the President and Vice President, a virtual tour and historical information on the White House, and access to press releases and other White House publications.
    http://www.whitehouse.gov/
  • White House Historical Association — Lessons and background information on the White House and the Presidency.
    http://www.whitehousehistory.org/

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