Library of Congress

Teachers

The Library of Congress > Teachers > Additional Resources > Resources from Outside the Library > General
  • About: The Human Internet — Links to sites evaluated by 750 “guides” who provide commentary on a broad range of subjects.
    http://about.com/
  • Academic Index — A reference meta-search engine developed by librarian Michael Bell.
    http://www.academicindex.net
  • Academic Info — This site provides links organized by topic. Maintained by librarian Mike Madin.
    http://www.academicinfo.net/
  • Academy of Achievement — The Academy provides interviews with achievers in the arts, business, public service, sports, and science and exploration.
    http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/pagegen/index.html
  • Ask Oxford — An array of resources related to the English language and its use. From Oxford University Press.
    http://www.askoxford.com/?view=uk
  • Ask a Scientist — The Cornell Center for Materials Research provides this question-answering service.
    http://www.ccmr.cornell.edu/education/ask/
  • Bartleby.com — Search dictionaries, encyclopedias, collections of quotations, and other reference works from this site.
    http://www.bartleby.com/
  • Calendar Converter — Fourmilab’s site allows users to convert a date from standard format to a range of other calendars.
    http://www.fourmilab.to/documents/calendar/
  • Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide — The venerable Chicago Manual of Style presents an excellent reference on citation styles.
    http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
  • Comprehensive Online Research Education — A tutorial that takes users through the steps in the research process. From the Purdue University library.
    http://gemini.lib.purdue.edu/core/login/login.cfm
  • Conversion Maestro — Allows users to convert from metric to U.S. or U.S. to metric measures. Also shows the conversion equations.
    http://www.masm.org/calc.aspx
  • Digital Librarian — Librarian Margaret Vail Anderson provides a large collection of links organized by topic.
    http://www.digital-librarian.com/
  • Digital Library Colloquium — Carnegie Mellon University Libraries present a series of programs on the work of libraries in the digital age.
    http://www.library.cmu.edu/Libraries/DLColloquia.html
  • DocuTicker — Resource Shelf provides this daily listing of new reports from “government agencies, NGOs, think tanks, and other public interest organizations.”
    http://www.docuticker.com/
  • Education Commission of the States — Education news and background on issues in education.
    http://www.ecs.org/
  • FactCheck.org — The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania checks the accuracy of political speeches and television ads.
    http://www.factcheck.org/
  • Fact Monster — An easy-to-use online almanac for kids from the publishers of the Information Please Almanac.
    http://www.factmonster.com/
  • Fora.tv — This site brings together video content from 115 partners, including the World Affairs Council, American Jewish Committee, Cato Institute, and Aspen Institute.
    http://www.fora.tv/
  • FXConverter — Allows the user to make conversions among 164 different currencies.
    http://www.oanda.com/converter/classic
  • GoCurrency — Along with converting currency, this site creates pocket currency converters for travel and creates graphs showing historic conversion rates.
    http://www.gocurrency.com/
  • Google Earth — This site from the popular search engine allows users to examine earth and sky.
    http://earth.google.com/
  • Harvard @ Home — Video of lectures presented at Harvard on topics ranging from the humanities relationship to science, to gender and race, Islam and the United States, and W.B. Yeats’s poem “Among School Children.”
    http://athome.harvard.edu/
  • ibiblio — The University of North Carolina provides links to interesting sites, including many that provide primary sources.
    http://www.ibiblio.org/
  • Internet Public Library — Starting point for using the Web as a reference tool. A project of the University of Michigan, which also sponsors reference tools for young people called KidSpace and TeenSpace.
    http://www.ipl.org/
  • Internet Scout Project — Weekly newsletter of online resources screened by librarians and scholars at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; also available by e-mail. An archive of past issues is searchable.
    http://scout.wisc.edu/
  • KidsClick — An extensive set of links librarians have prescreened to ensure their appropriateness for young people. Maintained by San Jose State University and the Ramapo Catskill Library System.
    http://www.kidsclick.org/
  • Kid's Search Tools — From this page, young people can search dictionaries, encyclopedias, and databases of sites designated as appropriate for their use. From the Ramapo Catskill Library System.
    http://www.rcls.org/ksearch.htm
  • Librarians' Index to the Internet — Searchable database of more than 16,000 sites selected and evaluated by librarians. Contains detailed subject index. A project of the California State Library.
    http://lii.org/
  • LibrarySpot — A portal to reference and library sites on the Web. Produced by StartSpot Mediaworks.
    http://www.libraryspot.com/
  • MagPortal — Allows users to search free magazines for articles on subjects of interest.
    http://www.magportal.com/
  • MSU Open Courseware — Michigan State University provides access to selected course material, as well as links to other universities participating in the Open Courseware project.
    http://msuglobal.com/2011/04/open-knowledge-for-development-msu/
  • MuseumStuff.com — Links to museums worldwide, as well as online exhibits. Maintained by the marketing firm Discovery Media.
    http://www.museumstuff.com/
  • One Look — This site allows users to search multiple dictionaries simultaneously; it also provides links to 120 dictionary sites.
    http://www.onelook.com/
  • Online Conversion — Comprehensive tools for converting units of measure.
    http://www.onlineconversion.com/
  • Refdesk.com — An extensive index to Internet sites, with multiple organizational schemes to facilitate browsing. Maintained by Bob Drudge, father of the better known Matt Drudge.
    http://www.refdesk.com/
  • Reference Center — The U.S. Government provides extensive links to reference sites.
    http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Reference_Shelf.shtml
  • SchoolMatters — A site rich with data on education at the school building, district, and state levels, along with case studies on successful data-based school improvement efforts. Tutorials for using data are also provided. From the Council of Chief State School Officers and Standard and Poor’s.
    http://www.schoolmatters.com
  • Surfing the Net with Kids — Newspaper columnist Barbara Feldman provides site reviews, online book clubs, and more.
    http://www.surfnetkids.com/
  • Uncommon Knowledge — The Hoover Institution provides numerous interviews with political leaders, scholars, and reporters.
    http://www.hoover.org/multimedia/uk/
  • Virtual Learning Resources Center — A meta-page designed especially for high school and college students doing academic research on the Internet. Created by librarian Michael Bell.
    http://www.virtuallrc.com/
  • Voice of the Shuttle — Links to information on the humanities and social sciences. Maintained by Alan Liu at the University of California at Santa Barbara.
    http://vos.ucsb.edu/
  • Wikipedia — One of the Web’s most frequently accessed sites, Wikipedia is a free collaboratively developed encyclopedia.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
  • Who2? — Data base of brief biographies on hundreds of public figures, past and present.
    http://www.who2.com/
  • Yahoo Education: Search Reference — Users can search dictionaries, encyclopedias, Gray’s Anatomy, Roget’s Thesaurus, and the Columbia Encyclopedia from this site.
    http://education.yahoo.com/reference

Top