Skip Navigation Links The Library of Congress >> Researchers
Rare Book & Special Collections Reading Room (Library of Congress)
  Home >> Special Collections >> Susan B. Anthony Collection

Susan B. Anthony Collection - Annotated Bibliography With Inscriptions.

Transcribed and Edited by Rosemary Fry Plakas
American History Specialist, Rare Book and Special Collections Division

In 1903 woman suffrage pioneer Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) donated her personal library to the Library of Congress. During the winter holidays of 1902-03 Anthony prepared her books that lined shelves in the study of her Madison Street home in Rochester, New York, for shipment to Washington. In many of the volumes Anthony added thoughtful reflections about the author or the donor or what the book meant to her or to the movement. These personal annotations offer a rare opportunity for Anthony to share her remembrances of her contemporaries and the value she placed on the literature she collected.

In addition to the official reports of national suffrage conventions, addresses made at Congressional hearing, suffrage campaign literature, and files of reform periodicals, Anthony's library contains thirty-three extensive scrapbooks filled with newspaper clippings, programs, and other memorabilia that Anthony created between 1855 and 1900, which document the persistent progress of the suffrage movement and the gradual change in public attitudes. A number of volumes formerly owned by or presented to Anthony by family, friends, and admirers offer further insights into her personal relationships and contemporary reading habits. For an outstanding overview of Anthony's library that highlights some of Anthony's most interesting annotations, see Leonard N. Beck's “Library of Susan B. Anthony” in the Quarterly Journal of the Library of Congress, vol. 32, no. 4, October 1975, p. 324-335.

This bibliography is arranged by author and title in shelflist order, followed by transcribed inscriptions. Editor's notes are in italics.

 


Dick, Thomas.
Complete works of Thomas Dick, LL.D. St. Louis, Mo.: Edwards & Bushnell, 1854. 2 v.
AC8 .D6 1854 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16020011

Thomas Dick (1774-1857), Scottish minister and science teacher, studied astronomy and philosophy. His first popular work, Christian Philosopher, published in 1823, explored the connection between science and religion.

 


Abridgment of the Book of martyrs: to which are prefixed, the living testimonies of the church of God, and faithful martyrs, in different ages of the world; and the corrupt fruits of the false church, in the time of the apostacy. To this work is annexed an account of the Just Judgments of God on persecutors, &c. . . New-York: Printed and sold by Samuel Wood, 1810. front. [9p.] 603 p. Subscribers' Names, 12 p.
BR1601 .B7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/04024599

Inscribed: Daniel Anthony, Battenville N.Y. This book of Martyrs was read by me with blood curdling horror. It was among the few books in my parents Library as long ago as I can remember. Religion--what crimes are perpetuated in thy name!! Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. Dec. 25, 1902

The Anthony family lived in Battenville, N. Y. from 1826 to 1839

 


Holy Bible … Edinburgh, Printed by the assigns of A. Kincaid, 1789.
BS185 1789 .E4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82044606

Inscribed: This was my Grandmothers-Susannah Richardson Read-who made it a rule to read it through every year. In later times she had a large Bible--with coarse print-that she read in. These books-the bible & hymn book-were saved by my mother-Lucy Read Anthony-and given by her daughter to the Library of Congress. Jan. 1. 1904-Susan B. Anthony

Daniel Read Born September the 10 1756
Susannah Read Born December the 12 1756
Amy Read Born August the 11. 1777
Aaron Read Born May the 15. 1780
Joshua Read Born August the 30. 1783
Joseph Read Born August the 21. 1786
Hannah Read Born May the 11. 1791
Lucy Read Born December the 2 1793
Hannah Read died April 14 1793
Daniel Read Jun. Born March the 20 1800, died October the 14th 1801

 


Scott, Job.
Works of that eminent minister of the gospel, Job Scott. Philadelphia, John Comly, 1831. 2 v.
BX7617 .S4 (Anthony Coll.)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15016179

v. 1 Inscribed: Daniel Anthony, Battenville NY

Inscribed by Anthony: Presented to the National Library by Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

v. 2 Inscribed: Daniel Anthony, Battenville, N.Y.

Inscribed by Anthony: Presented to the Library--that the reader may see the doctrines that were taught to my father's children-- my Mother used to say she became a better Quaker-or Friend-- than was my father. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902.

Job Scott (1751-1793), Quaker minister from Providence, R. I., died in Ireland of small pox while visiting Friends meetings. Abridged editions of his Journal were published in 1797and 1815, but controversy ensued after publication of his doctrinal commentary regarding salvation by Christ.

 


Woolman, John.
Journal of John Woolman with an Introduction by John G. Whittier. Glasgow: Robert Smeal, Crosshill, 1883. 315 p.
BX7795 .W7 A3 1883a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16007133

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony with the affectionate Regard of Elizabeth Pease Nichol, Huntly Lodge, Edinburgh, August 1883

Inscribed by Anthony: I spent two weeks at Huntley Lodge with Mrs. Elizabeth Pease Nichol in 1883-Mrs. Rebeca Moore going with me from London-it was a delightful time. Mrs. Nichol gave me the silouhette (sp) of Wendell Phillips and his wife, Ann Green Phillips-given her when on their wedding tour in 1840. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25, 1902.

Anthony spent most of 1883 abroad, sightseeing in Europe and speaking at several suffrage gatherings in Great Britain and visiting suffrage leaders including Margaret Bright Lucas, Jane Cobden, Margaret Parker and Frances Power Cobbe. She visited Mrs. Nichol in Edinburgh in July. Elizabeth Pease Nichol (1807-1897), British abolitionist and suffragist, had met Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the 1840 World Anti-slavery Convention in London where the women were segregated.

In the introduction, Whittier praises Woolman's persistent efforts to persuade his fellow Quakers to free their slaves and notes the influence of his writings on abolitionists and eventual emancipation. The Journal of Woolman (1720-1772) relates his travels to Friends meetings throughout the colonies preaching against slavery and his trip to England to visit Friends meetings, where he died of small pox in York.

 


Spencer, Anna Garlin.
Bell street chapel discourses . . . containing selections from the writings of James Eddy . . . 1889-1899. Providence, R.I. Printed by Journal of Commerce Co., 1899. 111 p.
BX9999 .P9 B42 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16004810

Inscribed: Miss Susan B. Anthony from Sarah J. Eddy. December 1899

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Selections of Spencer's early sermons, outlining the purposes and ideals envisioned by the Bell Street Chapel's founder James Eddy, are here collected and reprinted by Anna Garlin Spencer, resident minister and President of the Society, to mark the tenth anniversary of this religious society. From 1891 until 1903 Spencer (1851-1931), the first female minister in Rhode Island, lead the Society's search for religious truth through commitment to social justice and to the dignity and equal rights of all human beings.

 


Celebration in honor of Susan B. Anthony's eighty-sixth birthday. Washington D.C., 1906. 3 p. port..
CT99 .A628 N3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk81034647

Gift of Ida Husted Harper, 1924.

Inscribed on front cover: Her funeral took place one month from this day.

 


Turner, Eliza S.
Margaret J. Burleigh: In Memoriam. n.p., n.d.. 8 p.
CT99 .B961 T8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82064223

Eliza Sproat Turner (1826-1903), Philadelphia reformer and writer, was particularly concerned with issues effecting working women and poor children. Margaret Burleigh, a Philadelphia abolitionist, was a former teacher and close friend of Turner's. Rev. Dr. William Furness and Robert Purvis, mentioned as speaking at Burleigh's funeral, both died in 1898.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
In memoriam. An address in memory of Capt. Prince S. Crowell, who died November 5, 1881: Delivered in Association Hall, East Dennis, Mass., on Monday, December 11, 1881. Rochester, N.Y.: Clague & Wegman, printers, n.d.. 16 p.
CT99 .C953 P5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82048263

Inscribed: That it is the writing of Park Pillsbury-the Jeremiah of the Anti Slavery movement. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. Jan. 1, 1903.

Pillsbury recalls the contributions of Cape Cod sea captains like Crowel to the abolitionist cause.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Stephen Symonds Foster. From the Granite Monthly for August. Concord, N.H., 1882. 7 p.
CT99 .F757 P5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83010102

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Pillsbury recalls Foster's practice of interrupting church services to speak against slavery.

 


Daughters of the American Revolution.
A Monument in memory of Reubena Hyde Walworth. . . n.p., 1899.
CT99 .W242 D3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82070521

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Reubena Hyde Walworth (1867-1898) died of typhoid fever contracted while nursing soldiers returning from Cuba at Camp Wikoff, Long Island. A DAR monument to her memory is in Greenfield Cemetery, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Her mother, Ellen Hardin Walworth (1832-1915), was a founder of the Daughters of the American Revolution and Director-general of the Women's National War Relief Association.

In addition to a call for DAR contributions to a monument to commemorate Walworth's patriotic service, the circular includes letters from soldiers and physicians testifying to her nursing contributions.

 


Somerset, Henry, Lady. Lady Isabel Caroline (Somers-Cocks).
Frances E. Willard: An Address given by Lady Henry Somerset at the Memorial Service of the Fifth Biennial Convention of the World's Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Free Assembly Hall, Edinburgh, 23rd June, 1900. Uxbridge: Hutchings' printing works, n.d.. 16 p. port..
CT99 .W693 S6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82024930

Frances Willard (1839-1898) was National President of the WCTU from 1879 until her death. Lady Henry Somerset (1851-1921), British philanthropist and social reformer, became President of the British Woman's Temperance Association in 1890 and brought Willard to her estate for rest.

 


In memoriam: Sarah Walter Chandler Coates. Published as a loving tribute by her children, Laura Coates Reed, John Lindley Coates, Arthur Chandler Coates. Kansas City, Mo., Press of Hudson-Kimberly Publishing Co., 1898. 190 p. front. port..
CT275 .C647 R4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15019666

Inscribed: For Miss Susan B. Anthony. With kind regards. Laura Coates Reed, John Lindley Coates, Arthur Chandler Coates. Dec., 1898

Inscribed by Anthony: A noble pioneer for Anti slavery and for Woman suffrage--in Kansas City, Mo-but really for all State of Kansas. Susan B. Anthony. 17 Madison St. Rochester, N. Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Includes Sarah Coates narrative of her travels from Pennsylvania to Kansas City and her first trip to Lecompton in the Kansas territory in1856 when her husband was counsel to the imprisoned Gov. Robinson. Photographic prints show family homes and churches in Kennett Square, Pa. and early building development in Kansas City in the 1860s. Among the many tributes by her friends is one by Susan B. Anthony, recalling her visits with Sarah Coates in 1870 and 1896 and recognizing Coates as being the leader of the suffrage cause in Kansas City.

Sarah Walter Chandler Coates (1823-1897) accompanied her businessman husband Kersey to Kansas City in 1856. She supported his leadership in the Free State movement and was an active supporter of antislavery, woman suffrage, and a leader of civic activities and charities including the Women's Christian Association.

 


Charles de Berard Mills, 1821-1900. Syracuse? N.Y., 1900. 41 p. front. port..
CT275 .M53 C5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/18011896

On front flyleaf: Miss Susan B. Anthony with the grateful love of Harriet May Mills, January 23, 1901. A portrait of Charles D.B. Mills is pasted on the verso.

Inscribed on title page: A noble man after the make of Rev. Beriah Green. And his splendid daughter-Harriet May Mills-is a pattern after him. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

In her remarks at Mills' memorial service Anthony recalls his staunch support of abolition and his hospitality to social reformers in his Syracuse home.

At the encouragement of her parents and Anthony, Harriet May Mills (1857-1935) became a leader and organizer in the New York state and national suffrage movement.

 


Miller, Florence Fenwick.
In Ladies' Company: Six interesting women. London: Ward and Downey, 1892. 210 p.
CT3202 .M6 c. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: To my beloved & much honoured friend & leader of women, Susan B. Anthony. Florence Fenwick Miller. Feb. 15. 1902

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Florence Fenwick Miller (1854-1935), British feminist lecturer and journalist, was an ardent suffragist. Her extensive writing on women's issues included a weekly column for the Illustrated London News from 1886 to 1918. She came to the U.S. in 1902 to attend the International Council of Women, for which she served as treasurer.

In he In Ladies' Company Fenwick Miller collects biographical sketches that tell of the friendship of Mary Stuart and Mary Seton; the volatile life of the Bourbon princess, Duchess de Berri; how 18th century Edinburgh society's view of women's place limited the intellectual potential of poet Alison Cockburn; the repression of the musical genius of Fanny Mendelssohn because of her sex; Caroline Herschel's contributions to astronomy; and the self-reliance and courage displayed by the belated world travels of Ida Pfeiffer.

 


Stocqueler, J. H.
Life of Field Marshall the Duke of Wellington. Auburn: Alden, Beardsley &co.; Rochester: Wanzer, Beardsley & co., 1853. port. illus., plates..
DA68.12 .W4 S6 1853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15010895

Inscribed: D. R. Anthony, 1858

Inscribed by Anthony: Presented to the Congressional Library by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902.

Inscribed, but erased: D. R. Anthony with compliments of [William H. Hayward?]

 


Mackie, John B.
Life and work of Duncan McLaren / by J.B. Mackie. London , New York : T. Nelsons and Sons, 1888.
DA816 .M2 M2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/03014468

Vol. 1 Inscribed by Priscilla Bright McLaren: To my Beloved & Honoured Friend, Susan B. Anthony. From Priscilla Bright McLaren. Newington House, Edinburgh. August 4th 1899.
Knowing that her Friend will be able to sympathise with a life of struggle for truth and freedom-her own life having been nobly devoted to a much harder struggle in obtaining freedom for her own sex against ages of legal wrong, custom & prejudice, requiring weapons of lion like courage & great intellectual powers to assail. With Heaven born zeal she used these weapons, preserving thro all her loving woman's heart, which has endeared her to me even more than to her who has the privilege of presenting her with this Book whilst being a much loved quest in her Edinburgh home on the evening before her departure for her onward journey towards her own home beyond the sea in U.S.A.

Inscribed by Anthony: This is a souvenir given me by Mrs. Priscilla Bright McLaren-- The elder sister of John Bright and his younger brother Jacob Bright. The former like Horace Greeley got a crotchet in his head that he didn't believe in Woman Suffrage-and so opposed it-while Jacob Bright was the women's champion on the floor of the British Parliament, following John Stuart Mill-therefore honored by all women be the name of Jacob Bright, as well as John Stuart Mill.

This book is presented to the Congressional Library-not only for Duncan McLaren's sake-who always stood for woman suffrage-but for his wife's sake. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec 25 1902

Vol. 2 Inscribed by Priscilla McLaren: Susan B. Anthony
Inscribed by Anthony: This Life of Duncan McLaren M. P. was given me by his wife-Mrs. Priscilla Bright McLaren on my visit at Newington House Edinboro (sic) Scotland in June 1899 after the International Council of Women in London Eng.--My friend Mrs. E. M. Gross of Chicago with me. It was a delightful visit that we had. Dr. Agnes McLaren was the hostess. Mrs. McLaren at 84 kept her bed & room most of the time.

John Bright's son & wife spent a few days there-also Helen Bright Clark's daughter. Mrs. Bright Clark is the only daughter of John Bright. I saw her in Nov. 1883 at the Liberal meeting held at Leeds demand the Suffrage when her father was silent on the subject-Brave daughter, worthy of her fathers better days! Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25 1902.

Duncan McLaren (1800-1886), MP for Edinburgh from 1865-1881, married Priscilla Bright (1815-1906), sister of John and Jacob Bright and Margaret Bright Lucas. Agnes McLaren was their daughter, later a missionary doctor in India. The Convention of the National Liberal Federation where Anthony heard Bright Clark speak was in Leeds, England, October 17-18, 1883.

 


Court and camp of Bonaparte, with a portrait of Tallyrand, complete in one volume. New York: J. & J. Harper, 1837. 389p. fold. geneal. table..
DC198 .A1 C6 1837 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82085183

Inscribed: My Mother was as familiar with the lives of Bonaparte & Josephine as with her a-b-c. I present this to the Congressional Library in memory of her. Susan B. Anthony Rochester N.Y. Dec 25. 1902.

 


Memes, John S.
Memoirs of the Empress Josephine. New-York: Harper & brothers, 1837. 396 p.
DC216.1 .M46 1837 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17031510

Inscribed: Lucy Read Anthony The Mother of Susan A. read & re-read this & other books of the Battenville Library the rules of which are on the cover facing this. [rebound, rules not extant] My father kept the books to loan to the town's people & to the Factory hands-all are lost but these three copies. This is 64 years ago. This is presented with the memory of both of my parents. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

The Anthony family lived in Battenville, N. Y. from 1826 to 1839

 


Josephus, Flavius.
Genuine works of Flavius Josephus / translated by William Whiston. Bridgeport, [Conn.]: M. Sherman, 1828. 6 v.
DS116 .J7 1828 Anthony Coll (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/03013527

v. 1. Inscribed: These books were owned by James Watson & Emeline Mosher-Jan. 25, 1832, Easton, ?.?. Found in the old book-case of 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. by Susan B. Anthony. Dec. 25, 1902.

v. 2. Inscribed: James Watson 25 Jany 1832
Inscribed by Anthony: This is the husband of your fathers-Eugene Mosher's-sister Emeline. This is written by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25, 1902.

v. 3. Inscribed: Jas Watson 25 Jany 1832
Inscribed by Anthony: The husband of Eugene Mosher's sister Emeline Mosher Watson. This is found among the Anthony books by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, Dec. 25, 1902.

v. 4. Inscribed: James Watson 25 Jany 1832
Inscribed by Anthony: James Watson was the husband of Emeline Mosher-the sister of Eugene Mosher-the father [of] Arthur Anthony, Frank Merritt, Wendell Phillips, and Louise Helen Mosher (James)-and my second sister Hannah L. Anthony (Mosher) was their mother. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25, 1902

v. 5. Inscribed: James Watson 25 Jany 1832
Inscribed by Anthony: Emeline Mosher Watson was his wife-and she was the sister of Eugene Mosher, the father of A.A. F.M. W. P. and L.H. Mosher and my sister Hannah L. A. Mosher was their mother. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester N.Y Dec. 25. 1902.

v. 6. Inscribed: James Watson 25 Jany 1832
Inscribed by Anthony: This was the husband of Emeline Mosher-the sister of Eugene Mosher-the husband of my sister Hannah L. Anthony Mosher. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N. Y. Dec. 25--1902.

 


Josephus, Flavius
Works of Flavius Josephus: comprising the antiquities of the Jews; a history of the Jewish wars; and life of Flavius Josephus, written by himself. Tr. from the original Greek by William Whiston . . . Together with numerous explanatory notes, and three dissertations. Philadelphia: J. B. Smith & co., 1854. 2 v.
DS116 .J7 1854 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17031527

Ap 03 SBA stamp in vol. 1.

 


Bremer, Fredrika.
Homes of the new world; impressions of America. Tr. Mary Howitt. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1854. 2 v.: 651 p.; 654 p.
E166 .B853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16003751

Vol. 1 Inscribed: This noble woman from Sweden gave her impressions of America in 1853-we have improved some since then. But this goes to the Congressional Library, Washington, D.C. From Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Vol. 2 Inscribed: Two noble women-Frederika (sic) Bremer & Mary Howitt.
I present this book to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N. Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Collected letters of Bremer's two years' travels (September 1849- September 1851) in America, intended to strengthen brotherhood between people. Bremer's observations: Humanity of US has common creative principle of life-religious and civil consciousness-Love God above all things, and Thy neighbor as thyself. Free, pious, happy people with equal rights and equal opportunity. She hopes that the South will gradually end slavery by emancipation and colonization in Africa. Women are not equal to men because of lack of appropriate educational opportunities. Dorothea Dix's activist role is a model of feminine citizenship.

 


Parker, Margaret E.
Six happy weeks among the Americans. Glasgow, Printed by Hay Nisbet, 1876. "To be had by the author" 128 p. front. (port.) "Yours for the Right and the True, Margaret E. Parker." Blue cloth covers, blind stamped borders; title stamped in gold..
E168 .P24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15003841

Inscribed by author: Miss Susan B. Anthony, With the warm regards of the Author, The Cliff, Dundee, Scotland, Feby 24/77

Autographed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Parker, President of the Women's British Temperance Association, 1876-78 and the Women's International Christian Temperance Union, 1876-79, had represented the Grand Lodge of Scotland at temperance meetings in Ottawa, Toronto, and at Bloomington, Ill, May 25, 1875, and at the National Temperance Convention, Chicago, June 1, 1875. She embarked on SS Scandinavian, April 29 from Liverpool to Quebec, Canada. On board the twelve-day voyage were 84 children from Birmingham being sent to Canada. Her observations include: free independence among all classes of Americans; chivalry toward women; few servants; women attend college; in six weeks she sees only one drunk-an Englishman; no liquor served on trains; churches support temperance. She attends Natl. Temp convention in Chicago; praying, singing and closing saloons; Frances Willard, secretary of Women's Temperance Union, a good speaker; visits Niagara; in Canasto[ta] NY at home of Dr.[Milton Barlow ]Jarvis and Mrs. [Helen Raymond] Jarvis she rests in room where other worthies had stayed including Samuel J. May and "Gerritt Smith, the friend of the slave and equal rights, who had lately passed on to the higher life." Jarvis sons home from Cornell U, where young men and women are educated together; Parker speaks at Methodist Church; visits Syracuse, Rev. Celia Burleigh; visits House of Inebriates at Binghampton; temperance meeting at Great Bend with Hon. S.B. Chase; in Philadelphia, Lucretia Mott at 82 tells of London convention where Garrison sat in balcony with women delegates; women to be included in Centennial Exhibition; in Boston visits Wendell Phillips; visits public library where 70 ladies employed; visits Wm L Garrison-women are noblest workers. Visits Henry Blackwell and Lucy Stone- who keeps great house and cooks breakfast; together visit Lydia Maria Child, 73, gives photo and white roses. Mary Livermore eloquent speaker ; praises women reformers; describes huge breakfasts; Portland Maine, Post Office run by ladies, as in Boston, very reliable; prohibition-seized beer. Temperance meeting; embarks from Quebec.

 


Thompson, Richard W.
Recollections of sixteen presidents from Washington to Lincoln. Indianapolis, Bowen-Merrill Company, 1894. Edition deluxe. 2 v. fronts., ports. 438 p.
E176.1 .T46 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift, Susan B. Anthony Estate, March 23, 1936.

 


Proceedings of the Colored National Convention, held at Rochester, July 6th, 7th and 8th, 1853. Rochester, N. Y.: Printed at the Office of Frederick Douglass' Paper, 1853. 57 p.
E185.5 .C79 1853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This was a memorable event-to see so many colored men from all parts of the United States. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1902 (sic).

This convention led to establishing the National Council of the Colored People, the first permanent national organization for blacks. Frederick Douglass, as VP and Chairman of the Committee on Declaration of Sentiments, calls for free people of color to be treated with equality as other citizens, guaranteed by the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, their children to attend school, serve on juries and in the military, settle in western lands. He calls for repeal of Fugitive Slave law, abolition of slavery, and to stop efforts towards expatriation and colonization.

 


Proceedings of the Convention of colored men, held in Edwards opera house, Parsons, Kansas . . . Parsons, Kansas: W. B Avery, 1882. 16 p.
E185.93 .K16 C7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Proposals include Petition to Congress to make Oklahoma Territory land available to freedmen and loan equipment, seed, material for homes, to be repaid within five years. Avery proposes Mrs. Augustus Wilson (President of WCTU) to present Petition to Kansas Congressmen, "believing in the power and influence of women in doing good" and that all great American leaders "owe that greatness to women." Supported by President Rev. A. Fairfax, who also praises women of the Bible. Mr. Wilson of Commercial Bank will support his wife; Governor's, Senator's, and Judge's wives to accompany Mrs. Wilson to Washington as well as a delegation from the convention. Convention support Prohibition amendment to Kansas constitution. Normal school established by Society of Friends of Iowa to train colored teachers and colored adults. Parsons population: 6,000 whites and 800 colored.

 


[Gilbert, Olive].
Narrative of Sojourner Truth, a northern slave, emancipated from bodily servitude by the state of New York in 1828. Boston: Printed for the Author, 1850. xi; 144 p. front. (port.) Sojourner Truth. [paper covers loose/do not serve].
E185.97 .T87 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11027426

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

 


[Gilbert, Olive].
Narrative of Sojourner Truth; A Bondswoman of Olden Time . . . Battle Creek, Mich., Published for the Author, 1878. xii, 13- 320 p. front. (port.) Sojourner Truth "The Libyan Sibyl.".
E185.97 .T875 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This most wonderful woman-born in New York-40 years a slave there-and the remainder of her 50 and more years in freedom-had she been educated-no woman could have matched her. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Card de visite: Sojourner Truth "I Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance" affixed opposite title page. Reproduces the narrative of 1850 and adds lectures, letters and articles that describe Sojourner Truth's efforts for abolition, woman's rights and temperance over the next twenty five years. Collects messages from prominent leaders in her "Book of Life" including Frederick Douglass, Gerrit Smith, Jonathan Walker, and Susan B. Anthony.

 


Botta, Carlo.
History of the war of independence of the United States of America. Trans. George Alexander Otis. 4th edition. 2 v. fronts, plates, maps., New-Haven: N. Whiting. 1834.
E208 .B744 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/10020686

Vol. 1 inscribed: Hannah Anthony Mosher, Easton, Wash. Co, N.Y. Presented to the National Library Cg., Susan B. Anthony, Dec. 25, 1902.

Vol. 2 inscribed: Hannah Anthony & Eugene Mosher, Easton, N.Y. Presented to the Library Cg, Susan B. Anthony, Dec. 25, 1902.

Hannah Anthony Mosher and Eugene Mosher were Susan B. Anthony's sister and brother-in-law.

 


[Garrison, William Lloyd].
Loyalty and Devotion of Colored Americans in the Revolution and War of 1812. Boston: R. F. Wallcut, 1861. 24 p.
E269.N3 .G24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/12003488

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1. 1902 (sic)

Excerpts from various sources and dates, attesting to black service during the Revolution and War of 1812, including material from William C. Nell's Services of Colored Americans and Colored Patriots. Nell worked and wrote for the Liberator.

 


Effingham County Bar.
Celebration of John Marshall Day, Monday, February 4, 1901. Effingham, Ill., 1901. 35, [3] p. illus. (ports.)..
E302.6 .M4 E27 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17024778

Printed note pasted in: With the Compliments of Henry B. and Ada H. Kepley.

Inscribed: Mrs. Kepley was the first woman-or nearly so-admitted to the Bar of Illinois. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St., Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Program of proceedings honoring the 100th anniversary of John Marshall's induction into the office of Chief Justice of the United States. Includes addresses by Henry B. Kepley on Marshall as an advocate of the Constitution and by Ada H. Kepley on Marshall as a patriot (only women among five addresses) Includes portraits of speakers. Kepley was the first American woman to graduate from law school, in 1870; she devoted herself to temperance and women's rights causes.

 


Sparks, Jared.
Life of George Washington. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1853. xix, 562p. 2 port..
E312 .S738 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15010675

Inscribed: Daniel R. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., 1853. Presented to the Congressional Library, Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St., Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902.

 


Webster, Daniel.
Life, eulogy, and great orations of Daniel Webster. Rochester: W.M. Hayward & Co.; Boston: French & Co., 1854. 2 p. l., [3]-221 p. front. (port.).
E337.8 .W367 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/10027804

Inscribed: D. R. Anthony gave this book to S.B.A. in 1853-and she now presents it to the Congressional Library-with the hope that no man may bow so low to the old slave power again. Webster was matchless in powers of Oratory, but lacking in moral principle. Copy his good traits of character and shun his weaknesses. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902.

Daniel Read Anthony (1824-1904) was Susan B. Anthony's brother and editor and publisher of the Leavenworth Times, Leavenworth, Kansas.

 


Julian, George W.
Later speeches on political questions, with select controversial papers, by George W. Julian; ed. by his daughter, Grace Julian Clarke. Indianapolis: Carlon & Hollenbeck, 1889. vi, 317 p.
E415.6 .J96 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14021972

Inscribed by Susan B. Anthony: From the Hon. George W. Julian of Indianapolis, Ind. To Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., July 1. 1889.

Mr. Julian presented the first 16th amendment resolution for the enfranchisement of women in the House of Representatives in the year 1869!! S B. A.

 


Hollister, Ovando James.
Life of Schuyler Colfax. Chicago, New York [etc.]: Funk & Wagnalls, 1887. 535 p. front., plates, group port..
E415.9 .C68 H7 1887 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/41023739

Gift: Estate of Susan B. Anthony, July 28, 1941.

 


Frothingham, Octavius Brooks.
Gerrit Smith; a biography. New York: G. P. Putman's Sons, 1878. 381 p. front. (port.) 2 pl..
E415.9 .S64 F9, copy 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14003383

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, March 23, 1936.

Inscribed by Elizabeth Smith Miller: Present by Susan B. Anthony with Kind regards of Elizabeth Smith Miller. August 1892

Further inscribed by Anthony: And this book belongs to Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N. Y.

On p. 238 it is noted in print "In the following 15 pages several changes have been made by Elizabeth Smith Miller, daughter of Gerrit Smith" to which is added an autograph note in Elizabeth Smith Miller's hand: "on her own responsibility."

P238-252 are substituted for the original p.238 to 266, thus deleting the equivalent of 15 pages that discuss Smith's possible knowledge of John Brown's attack on Harper's Ferry, charges to that effect by Horace White and the Chicago Tribune, and Frothingham's comments.

 


Frothingham, Octavius Brooks.
Gerrit Smith; a biography. New York: G. P. Putman's Sons, 1879. Second edition. 371 p. front. (port), 2 pl..
E415.9 .S64 F92 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16012277

Stamp: Susan B. Anthony 21 Apr 03

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony gratefully accepts this one volume of the 24 given her by the daughter of Gerrit Smith-to present to friends & admirers of that great & generous abolitionist. S.B.A

Inscribed by ESM: Presented by Susan B. Anthony with Kind regards of Elizabeth Smith Miller. August 1892

Frothingham's Prefatory Note explains that there are changes related to John Brown and the attack on Harper's Ferry and a "final statement" on p.254. P238 to 252 are the same as in the 1878 variant edit by ESM, with her same autograph note. P.253-54 repeats part of Gerrit Smith's manifesto on John Brown, Aug 15, 1867, followed by the "final statement" referenced in Frothingham's Prefatory Note, stating that Smith and other friends had no previous knowledge of Brown's intention to invade Harper's Ferry, that his plan had been defensive , and there was no plan to foment insurrection, civil war, or shed innocent blood.

 


Hammond, Charles A. Gerrit Smith.
The story of a noble man's life. Geneva, N.Y.: Press of W. F. Humphrey, 1900. 80 p. front. (port.)..
E415.9 .S64 H2 copy 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/03033144

Inscribed by Elizabeth Smith Miller: To my father's & my dearly loved friend Susan B. Anthony, E.S. Miller, Aug. 12, 1900.

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1902 (sic.)

Laid in: Newspaper clipping [ca. 1900] "Emancipation Celebration." Covers 36th anniversary celebration in Geneva, N. Y. where Prof. R. H. Terrill spoke about black soldiers' service in wars in America.

A sympathetic biographical account by Hammond, a friend and former pastor of Gerrit Smith's Peterboro, N.Y., church.

 


Smith, Gerrit.
Speeches of Gerrit Smith in Congress [1853-1854]. New-York: Mason brothers, 1856. 3 p. l.,[v]-v1, [9]-426 p. front. (port)..
E431 .S65 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15018153

Inscribed by Gerrit Smith: Gerrit Smith to his namesake Gerrit Smith Stanton, April 26, 1859.

Inscribed: Gerrit S. Stanton to his friend S. B. Anthony amp;& Co., Rochester, N.Y., No. 151 Broadway, 1865

Inscribed by Susan B. Anthony: Gerrit Smith Stanton, the third son of my friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Inscribed by Susan B. Anthony: Gerrit Smith. I give to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. this day, Dec. 25, 1902 and subscribe myself Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester N.Y.

Gerrit Smith and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were first cousins, their mothers being sisters.

Gerrit Smith represented Madison and Oswego Counties, N.Y., in Congress from December 1853 to August 1854.

 


Bradford, Sarah Hopkins.
Harriet, the Moses of her people. New York, Printed by J.J. Little & Co., 1901. 171 p.
E444 .T893 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16007872

Inscribed: This most wonderful woman-Harriet Tubman-is still alive. I saw her but the other day at the beautiful home of Eliza Wright Osborne, the daughter of Martha C. Wright, in company with Elizabeth Smith Miller, the only daughter of Gerrit Smith, Miss Emily Howland, Rev. Anna H. Shaw and Mrs. Ella Wright Garrison, the daughter of Martha C. Wright and the wife of Wm. Lloyd Garrison Jr. All of us were visiting at Mrs. Osbornes, a real love feast of the few that are left, and here came Harriet Tubman! Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1, 1903.

Sarah Bradford compiled biographical sketches of Tubman, originally published in 1869 and 1886 (reprinted in 1901), that documented some of Tubman's travels through the Underground Railroad to guide enslaved family and friends from the eastern shore to freedom in the north. Proceeds from the book sales paid off the mortgage on Tubman's Auburn, N.Y., house and supported her efforts to care for sick and elderly blacks.

Martha Coffin Wright (1806-1875) was a friend of Tubman's and her Auburn home had been part of the Underground Railroad. Along with her older sister Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Wright was an organizer of the 1848 Seneca Fall Convention.

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
Commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia : Thos. S. Dando & Co., 1884. 65 p. front. port., Wm. Lloyd Garrison.
E449 .A5098 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/34005909

Copy 1 (Damaged, do not serve). Inscribed by Susan B. Anthony: This meeting was attended by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Copy 2 Inscribed: With the respects of the Committee

Proceedings of a meeting held in Philadelphia, December 4, 1883, with Robert Purvis, one of four surviving members of the original 63 members, presiding. John G. Whittier's account of the 1833 meeting was read. Beriah Green of Oneida Institute was chosen president; Whittier, Wm. L Garrison and Samuel May, a committee to draft a declaration of principles. Anthony spoke of first meeting abolitionists Isaac and Amy Post and Mary and William Hallowell in Rochester and Stephen and Abby Foster and credited the American Anti-Slavery Society with educating her to speak and organize. The battle for equality is not done until women have a voice in government. It was noted that although no woman signed the society's Declaration, Lucretia Mott and others contributed language. At evening session, Elizur Wright, another surviving signer, spoke of the role of Lucretia Mott in encouraging the formation of the society. William Still told of a girl shipped from Baltimore to Philadelphia in a chest and of Henry Brown shipped from Richmond whose stories he published in the Underground Railroad. Edwin H. Coates spoke about the slave auction block for Alexandria Va. Taken by Union soldiers and given to Dr. Seltz, a military surgeon. James N Buffum recalled recruiting Frederick Douglass in New Bedford to speak, but later Douglass being denied to ride the train, so that Buffum and John Collins also refused to ride and went by horse. In an appendix are letters sent by Wendell Phillips, John G. Whittier, Samuel May, and Henry Stanton.

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
Platform of the American Anti-Slavery Society and its auxiliaries. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1860. 35, [1] p.
E449 .A516 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11007596

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Includes the Constitution and Declaration of Sentiments of the American Anti-Slavery Society; Exposition of the Anti-Slavery Platform by William Lloyd Garrison, President; Sabbath Scene by J. G. Whittier; Constitution of the New York Anti-Slavery Society.

 


Armistead, Wilson, comp.
Garland of freedom; a collection of Poems, chiefly anti-slavery. Part III. London: W. and F.G. Cash and William Tweedie, 1853. 205, 6 p.
E449 .A733 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82028006

Inscribed: Arthur Anthony Mosher, Rochester, N.Y.

Inscribed: This is mainly valuable because it was published in 1853 and because of the many honored names contained therein. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Arthur Anthony Mosher (1851-1932) was a son of Susan's sister Hannah.

Wilson Armistead (1819-1868), Quaker businessman and leader of the Leeds, England, Anti-slavery Association, compiled and published 82 anti-slavery tracts, as well as several books. Armistead believed that distribution of such tracts could help to educate the masses of the evils of slavery. This compilation includes poems by John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell, Maria White Lowell, William Lloyd Garrison, Maria W. Chapman, Anne Warren Weston and Thomas Campbell.

 


Bradford, A[rthur] B[ullus].
Address delivered at the Re-union convention of the old abolitionists of eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania, October 1st, 1879. Alliance, Ohio: J.G. Garrison's copperplate print, 1879. 18 p.
E449 .B799 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11006908

Arthur B. Bradford (1810-1899), former station master on the Underground Railroad in western Pennsylvania, is critical of the policies of Reconstruction.

 


Chace, Elizabeth Buffum.
Anti-slavery reminiscences. Central Falls, R.I.: E. L. Freeman & son, state printers, 1891. 47 p. Paper covers detached..
E449 .C43 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11004183

Inscribed by Anthony after the author's name: the early abolitionist and one of the early pioneers of woman's rights of Providence, R. I. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st., Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Elizabeth Buffum Chace (1806-1899), a Quaker whose house was a station on the Underground Railroad, compiled her reminiscences at 85.

 


Colman, Lucy N.
Reminiscences. Buffalo, H. L. Green, 1891. 86 p. port..
E449.C713 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/12006642

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1, 1902 (sic)

Lucy Colman was a Rochester abolitionist and suffragist who lectured as agent for American Antislavery Society in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Colman relates stories of spiritualism and traditional religions. As matron at National Colored Orphan Asylum, she helped restore health of children and supported the removal of a wicked teacher. Colman reports taking Sojourner Truth to meet Abraham Lincoln. Colman didn't think Mary Surratt was guilty, but was wronged by men who arrested, tried, and hung her. Colman visits Richmond after the war. Includes a biographical sketch of her friend Amy Post, a staunch abolitionist and suffragist.

SBA folded page corners of page 18 and marked with blue pencil a reference to herself in Colman's account of being asked by Anthony to prepare an essay for a NY state teachers' convention, where Colman spoke against corporeal punishment in schools.

 


[Garrison, Wendell Phillips].
William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children. New-York: The Century co., 1885. 4 v. fronts., illus., plates, ports..
E449 .G2546 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11014856

Vols. 1 and 2 inscribed: Miss Susan B. Anthony, From the Children of William Lloyd Garrison, 125 Highland Street, Roxbury, Mass., U. S.A. October, 1889

Printed inside front cover: "Anna H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa" and "S.B.A

All 4 volumes listed as "Gift, Susan B. Anthony Estate, March 23, 1936"

 


Griffiths, Julia, editor.
Autographs for freedom / edited by Julia Griffiths. Auburn: Alden, Beardsley & Co., 1854. 309 p., ports., book advertisements, 9 p.
E449 .G851 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/05005877

Inscribed: Maria R. Wilder, Rochester, 1854

Inscribed by Anthony: This was given me by one of Rochesters oldest inhabitants-the sister of Samuel Wilder & Carter Wilder & of Webster Wilder of Hiawatha, Kansas--. Maria R. Wilder Duprey still living. The Wilder family occupied a pew in the Old Unitarian Church on the West side of Fitzhugh st. when Rev. Wm. Henry Channing preached there---1852, and presented to the Congressional Library, Washington D.C. by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25, 1902.

Compiled by the Rochester Ladies Anti-Slavery Society, this volume included prose and poetry selections by both local and nationally known abolitionists.

 


Child, Lydia Maria.
Isaac T. Hopper: a true life. Boston: John P. Jewett & Co.; Cleveland,O.: Jewett, Proctor & Worthington; London: Sampson Low, Son & Co., 1853. xvi, 493 p. 2 port..
E449 .H798 1853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11027409

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, 1853

Then inscribed: This looks like my father's Daniel Anthony's writing but am not sure--but Isaac T. Hopper was a great favorite of his, as well as of his daughter Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902.

Child's biography of Isaac Hopper (1771-1853), Quaker friend of fugitive slaves and discharged prisoners, includes anecdotes recalled from first person conversations.

 


Philadelphia female anti-slavery society.
Twenty-eight Annual report. Philadelphia: Merrihew & Thompson, 1862. 23 p.
E449 .P54 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 11001568

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Constitution a pro-slavery compact; or, Extracts from the Madison papers, etc. selected by Wendell Phillips. New York: American anti-slavery society, 1856. third edition. 208 p.
E449 .P556 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11020216

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Introduction states that the extracts from debates of the federal convention and state conventions demonstrate the compromise made between freedom and slavery in 1787.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Acts of the Anti-slavery Apostles. Concord, N.H. [Clague, Wegman, Schlicht, & Co., Printers], 1883. vii, 503 p.
E449 .P63 1883 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, March 23, 1936.

Inscribed: S. B. A. from P. P. in memory of "days lang syne," 1883.

Also inscribed: This book I give to the Congressional Library, Washington D. C., this day, Dec. 25, 1902. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St., Washington, DC (sic)

Anthony annotates, in her usual blue pencil, passages on page 498-502 related to Pillsbury's contention in 1865 that though the war had ended, the work of the anti-slavery society was not done until blacks gained equal rights, including suffrage.

Parker Pillsbury (1809-1898) radical abolitionist lecturer and women's rights advocate, favored universal suffrage of blacks and women and co-edited The Revolution with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Anthony.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Church as it is; or, the forlorn hope of slavery. Second edition. Boston: Bella Marsh, 1847., 1847. 90 p.
E449 .P638 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/24016088

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

On verso of title page, above a pasted down clipping of advertisements for two estate sales of Negroes, Anthony writes "From a Charleston, South Carolina Paper, Feb. 5, 1858" and below the clipping: "who could believe this but so short a time ago. Susan B. Anthony. Jan. 1.1903" The printed stamp of Anthony's biographer, "Ida Husted Harper, Mar 18 1924" is imposed over Anthony's writing.

At bottom of last page is a pasted down clipping re the poisoning of 37 people by a Negro cook in Augusta, Ga., annotated by Anthony "1858 probably."

 


Thompson, George.
Letters and addresses by George Thompson, during his mission in the United States. Boston: Isaac Knapp, 1837. xii, 126 p.
E449 .T72 c. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/10021291

Inscribed by Anthony: George Thompson in the United States 1834 and 1835.
Presented to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Dec. 25, 1902

George Thompson (1804-1878), British antislavery lecturer toured the U.S as agent for the New England Antislavery Society.

 


Furness, William Henry.
Discourse occasioned by the Boston fugitive slave case, delivered in the First Congregational Unitarian Church, Philadelphia, April 13, 1851. Philadelphia : Merrihew and Thompson, 1851. 15 p.
E450 .F983 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/2001553978

William Henry Furness (1802-1896) was pastor of this Unitarian Church and a stanch abolitionist.

 


Prayer of one hundred thousand: speech of Hon. Chas. Sumner on the presentation of the first installment of the emancipation petition of the Women's National League. [New York: Women's Loyal National League, 1864. 4 p.
E453 .S923 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Susan B. Anthony was the secretary of the Women's Loyal League that collected 365,000 names on petitions calling for the emancipation of all slaves in the United States.

 


Memorial addresses delivered before the two houses of Congress on the life and character of Abraham Lincoln, James A. Garfield, William McKinley. Prepared in accordance with concurrent resolution of Congress, and under direction of Joint Committee on Printing. Washington: Govt. Print. Off., 1903.
E457.8 .U56 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/24018608

 


Conway, Moncure D.
Rejected stone; or, Insurrection vs. resurrection in America. By a native of Virginia. Boston: Walker, Wise, and company, 1862. second edition. 131 p.
E458.1 .C762 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11020398

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, July 28, 1941
Signed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.

 


Conway, Moncure D.
Golden hour. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1862. 160 p.
E458.2 .C767 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11020397

Inscribed: To Miss Susan B. Anthony, From Parker Pillsbury. 1862
Signed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902.

Moncure D. Conway (1832-1907), Virginia native who abhorred slavery, became disenchanted with the Union when war continued without the immediate universal emancipation that he championed in Golden Hour and Rejected Stone. Conway moved to England in 1863 and served as free thought minister of South Place Chapel for many years, while writing many books, including biographies of Thomas Paine and other founding fathers.

 


Blackwell, Sarah Ellen.
A military genius. Life of Anna Ella Carroll, of Maryland, ("the great unrecognized member of Lincoln's cabinet."). Compiled from family records and congressional documents. Washington, D. C.: Judd & Detweiler, printers, 1891. 2 v. 2 pl. (including front., v. 2, Old Trinity Church, Dorchester County, Md. where Anna Carroll is buried) 3 port. (including front., v. 1, Anna Ella Carroll)..
E472.9 .C31 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/07015649

V. 1 Inscribed: Miss Sarah E Blackwell did a worthy thing when she gathered together the facts with regard to Ann Ella Carroll's work and saved them for future generations to care over. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan 1. 1903.

V. 2 Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.
The wonderful military genius of this woman cannot, will not be duly appreciated until the public thought is will to accord Equal rights, powers and privileges to women. S.B.A.

Anna Ella Carroll (1815-1894), daughter of a Maryland governor, was an accomplished political writer whose war powers pamphlets provided legal reasoning for Lincoln's actions at the beginning of the Civil War. Her role as a military strategist has been a source of continuing controversy. Although Carroll collected significant documentation in support her claim that she had proposed the Tennessee campaign of 1862, recent scholarship suggests that Carroll's claims were exaggerated. Eventually Congress did grant her a small pension.

Sarah Ellen Blackwell (1828-1901), sister of the Doctors Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell, art teacher and reform writer, was engaged by suffragists to compile Carroll's biography and Civil war pamphlets and documents to support their contention that recognition was withheld only because Carroll was a woman operating in the male sphere.

 


Barber, John Warner and Henry Howe.
Historical collections of the state of New York; containing a general collection of the most interesting facts, traditions, biographical sketches, anecdotes, &c. relating to its history and antiquities, with geographical descriptions of every township in the state. New York, Published for the authors by S. Tuttle, 1842. 608 p. incl. pl. front. (ports.) illus., plates, fold. Map.
F119 .B24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/01015813

Inscribed (below the signature Eugene Mosher): Easton, Wash. Co. N. Y. This was the husband of my sister Hannah L?-and this book shows the look of the towns about 1840. Susan B. Anthony, Dec. 25, 1902.

At top of free endpaper is note: Page 471. On that page is an illustration of Troy Female Seminary with a marginal blue pencil line at the paragraph describing Emma Willard's pioneering efforts to secure an endowment for public education of females at Waterford and Troy, N.Y.

John Warner Barber (1798-1885) compiled books of state and local history featuring his wood engravings of local villages and scenes.

 


Wright, Elizur
Myron Holley; and what he did for liberty and true religion. Boston, Printed for the author, 1882. 328 p. front. (port.).
F123 .H73 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11021027

Inscribed: To Miss Susan B. Anthony with High respect from Elizur Wright, Dec. 7.'83

Inscribed: This in memory of Elizur Wright, Boston, Mass.-- and the Myron Holley, the father of Miss Sally Holley, and the founder of Unitarianism in the city of Rochester. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Elizur Wright (1804-1885) mathematician, actuary, publisher and abolitionist celebrates the contributions of Myron Holley (1779-1841) to the construction of the Erie Canal and raising the public conscience to the evils of slavery through his Rochester Freeman.

Sallie Holley (1818-1893) was an agent of the American Antislavery Society and later an educator of freedmen in Virginia.

 


Hale, Edward E.
Kanzas and Nebraska. : the history, geographical and physical characteristics, and political position of those territories; an account of the emigrant aid companies, and directions to emigrants. Boston: Phillips, Sampson and Company. New York: J. C. Derby, 1854. 256 p. front. map.
F666 .H16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/01000082

In pencil : D R Anthony from [WB&Co?]

Inscribed: Presented to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1902

Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909) was a Unitarian minister, abolitionist, and member of the board of the New England Emigrant Aid Society. In his preface of his best-selling guide book, he explains that he compiled this history and geography of the Kansas and Nebraska territories to encourage immediate settlement of the territories through the emigrant aid companies, in order to establish free states.

 


Hutchings, James Mason.
Scenes of wonder and curiosity in California. New York and San Francisco: A. Roman and company, 1871. 292 p., front. Yosemite Valley, illus..
F864 .H925 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14015493

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, With the Kind regards of the Author.

Inscribed: Sent me by Mr. J. M. Hutchings, the pioneer of the Yosemite Valley, just after my visit there with Mrs. Stanton in August 1871. We roomed outside but took our meals at his hotel-this in memory of that visit. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1902 [sic]

James Hutchings (1820-1902) was an inn keeper and pioneer promoter of tourism in the Yosemite Valley. His travel guide includes over one hundred illustrations of key tourist destinations.

Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton were on a lecture tour in California in June & July 1871, hoping to inspire support of the suffrage cause and to raise money to repay the Revolution debt. In July they traveled by horse to the Yosemite Valley, a nature respite that uplifted Anthony's spirits.

 


Fawcett, Henry.
Manual of political economy. Third edition. London: Macmillan, 1869. xxxi, 533 p.
HB171 .F27 1869 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16008141

Inscribed in pencil: E. A. [Bartlett?], Roch. Univ.

Stamped: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y.

Henry Fawcett (1833-1884) was Cambridge Professor of Political Economy, a liberal Member of Parliament, and a supporter of woman suffrage. In his preface he acknowledges the assistance of his wife, Millicent Garrett Fawcett, a suffrage activist.

 


Washington, Booker T.
Address of Booker T. Washington . . . delivered at the opening of the Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition, Sept. 18, '95. New York, 1895. 4 p.
HD8081 .A65 W355 1895 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan 1. 1903

 


Democratic Friends of All Nations.
All men are brethren : an address to the friends of humanity & justice among all nations. London : J. Cleave, 1845. 8 p.
HM146 .A45 1845 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95144111

Inscribed: H. C. Wright from Wm Lovett. London, 1847

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

William Lovett (1800-1877) was a British social reformer who sought improvements in political rights and education of London's working class. In his 1876 memoir Lovett indicated that he was the author of this address of the Democratic Friends, an early attempt to organize international socialists in London.

Henry Clarke Wright (1797-1870) was an American social reformer who was lecturing on abolition and nonresistance in the British Isles during the mid 1840s.

 


Fawcett, Millicent Garrett, Dame.
Paper read at the Bristol meeting of the Central Conference of Women Workers among women and children, November 1892: on the amendments required in the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1885/ by Mrs. Henry Fawcett. London: Women's Printing Society, 1892. 12 p.
HQ27.5 .F39 1892 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Fawcett calls for amendments to the criminal law that would provide legal punishment for incest and abolish the three months' limit within which abused girls, 13 to 16, must begin prosecution. She suggests that woman suffrage would expedite passage of needed reforms.

 


Wright, Henry C.
Marriage and parentage; or, the reproductive element in man, as a means to his elevation and happiness. Boston: Bela Marsh, 1855. Second edition, enlarged. 324 p. front. illus..
HQ31 .W95 1855 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17011724

Inscribed: Mary S. Anthony From Sister Susan. Rochester Dec. 25, 1856

Mary S. Anthony (1827-1907) was 29 and teaching in the public schools of Rochester in 1856.

Henry C. Wright, radical abolitionist and pacifist, recommends sexual abstinence in marriage except for procreation and then only when decided by the wife.

 


Riddle, Albert Gallatin.
The Social Evil. Remarks of Mr. Riddle to the Mass Meeting of the Womwn's Club at Lincoln Hall, September 22, 1871. Washington, D. C., 1871. 3 p.
HQ144 .R5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Albert Riddle (1816-1902), District lawyer and former Ohio Congressman, contends that prostitution would disappear once equality of the sexes is established.

 


Duties of parents: Reproductive and educational. London, J. Burns, 1872. 160 p.
HQ755 .D85 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16021852

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Marriage does not justify sexual abuse; wives should have control over their person. Prospective parents are responsible for a reasonable expectation of good health and ability to educate their children and cannot delegate to others.

 


The Una: a paper devoted to the elevation of woman. Vol.1, no. 1 (Feb. 1853)-v. 3, no. 10 (Oct. 15, 1855) missing vol. 1, no. 2 (Mar. 1853). Editors: Feb. 1853-Paulina W. Davis, with Caroline H. Dall, Jan. 1855-..
HQ1101 .U5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 09001456

Not part of original SBA library. Gift of Genevieve Lel Hawley, Nov. 1904, with the requirement that it be kept with the Anthony Collection. Hawley was a secretary of Anthony's who helped Ida Husted Harper with the preparation of Anthony's biography and vol. 4 of the History of Suffrage.

Paulina Wright Davis (1813-1876) abolitionist and suffragist organizer, founded the feminist magazine Una in 1853 to serve as a forum for exploring various women's issues.

 


International Council of Women.
Report of the International council of women, assembled by the National woman suffrage association, Washington, D. C., U. S. of America, March 25 to April 1, 1888. Washington, D. C.: R. H. Darby, printer, 1888. 471 p. front. (port.).
HQ1106 1888 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/09008483

Copy 2. Inscribed: This reports the First International Council of Women, and out of it grew the National & International Councils. There are 18 National societies affilliated (sic) in the National and 15 National Councils affiliated (sic) in the International-pretty well for 15 years. The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Feb. 15. 1903

Copy 3. Inscribed: This first International Council of Women was called by the National Womans Suffrage and resulted in the formation of the National Council and the International Councils which have proven a great success. The Library of Congress Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Feb. 15. 1903

Organized to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the first US women's rights convention and to establish an International Council. Frontise portrait of Lucretia Mott ( 1793-1880), one of the organizers of the 1848 meeting. Condensed from the stenographic report made by Mary F. Semour and assistants, for The Woman's Tribune. Sessions addressed Education, Philanthropies, Temperance, Industries, Professions, Organization, Legal Conditions, Social Purity, Political Conditions, Pioneers and Religion. Forty nine delegates, represented 53 organizations from England, France, Finland, Norway, Denmark, India, Canada, and U. S. Frances E. Willard was elected president of the National Council, Susan B. Anthony, Vice President, and May Wright Sewall, Corresponding Secretary. Millicent Garrett Fawcett of England was elected President of the International Council, Clara Barton, Vice President-at- Large, and Rachel G. Foster, Corresponding Secretary.

 


Mott, Lucretia.
Discourse on woman, delivered at the Assembly buildings, December 17, 1849. Reprint. Philadelphia, W. P. Kildare, 1869. 22 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28009005

First of fifty-four items, arranged chronologically, 1849-1879, and bound together by Anthony as "Miscellaneous Speeches." Preceded by typed list of contents, annotated by Anthony and inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Aug. 1880. 3 p., partially mutilated.

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, S. 4 19

Lucretia Mott (1793-1880) argues for woman's right to equality in education, marriage, and career opportunities.

 


Rose, Ernestine.
Speech of Mrs. Rose . . . at the anniversary Paine celebration. New York, 1850. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca26000180

Ernestine Rose (1810-1892) urges Congress to honor the memory of Thomas Paine by providing refuge for Lajos Kossuth and other Hungarian patriots.

Rose, Ernestine. An address on Woman's Rights, delivered before the People's Sunday Meeting, in Cochituate Hall. Boston: J. P Mendum, 1851. 21 p. HQ1114.M5 no. 3 Anthony Coll

Ernestine Rose (1810-1892), friend of Anthony and founding leader in the women's rights movement, encourages women to actively seek equality and work with men to elevate all humanity.

 


Rose, Ernestine.
An address on Woman's Rights, delivered before the People's Sunday Meeting, in Cochituate Hall. Boston: J. P Mendum, 1851.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Weld Grimke, Angelina.
Letter from Angelina Grimke Weld, to the Woman's rights convention, held at Syracuse, Sept. 1852. Syracuse, N.Y., Masters' print, 1852. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018614

Weld's letter is followed by a reprinting of Samuel May's letter to the October 1850 Worcester, Mass. Woman's Rights Convention, strongly supporting gender equality.

 


Gage, Matilda Joslyn.
Speech of Mrs. M.E. J. Gage, at the Women's rights convention, held at Syracuse, Sept. 1852. Syracuse, N.Y., Masters' print, 1852. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28009008

Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826-1898), friend and colleague of Anthony and a founding leader in the women's rights movement, contends that it is learning, energy and perseverance that determine a successful life, not one's sex. Education is the key to changing unjust laws.

 


Tefft, Benjamin Franklin.
An inaugural address, pronounced before the trustees of Genesee College, on being inducted into office as President of the institution, July 10, 1851. Cincinnati: Methodist Book Concern, 1851. 29 p. front. port..
HQ1114 .M5 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Benjamin Franklin Tefft (1813-1885), Methodist minister and President of Genesee College, Lima, N.Y., 1851-1854, champions equal education for men and women, the mind and soul being neither male nor female. Both sexes should be educated equally and together.

 


Fairchild, James Harris.
Joint education of the sexes. A report presented at a meeting of the Ohio State Teachers' Association, Sandusky City, July 8th. Oberlin: J.M. Fitch, 1852. 46 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28009007

James Harris Fairchild (1817-1902) was professor of Mathematics and later President of Oberlin College, the first American coeducational college. He argues that joint education of the sexes is not only the most economical, but provides the best social and moral influences, as well as the best learning experience.

 


Series of Woman's Rights Tracts. Reprinted by Curtis, Butts & Co. Rochester, N.Y., n.d..
HQ1114 .M5 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Contents: Speech of Wendell Phillips, Worchester, 1851. 24 p.; Sermon of the Public Function of Woman, . . . by Theodore Parker. Boston, 1853. 24 p.; [Harriet Taylor Mill] Enfranchisement of Women, reprinted from the Westminster and Foreign Quarterly Review, for July 1851. 28 p.; Woman and her wishes, an Essay by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, 1853. 32 p; Responsibilities of Woman. A Speech by Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols, Worchester, 1851. 18 p.

In her preface to a later printing, Lucy Stone explains that in 1853 she compiled this selection of early speeches on woman's rights because they clearly set forth the meaning and scope of the often misunderstood movement. She sold copies of the tracts at women's rights meetings to help pay for the halls and advertising.

Anthony reprints these tracts with a new paper cover under the title Series of Woman's Rights Tracts. On the front cover she first notes in pencil: "I have the stereotype plates of all in this pamphlet-5 tracts." And then: " no-no-all are lost-1898!" On the back cover this series is listed among seven titles that could be obtained from Anthony in Rochester.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address to the Legislature of New York, adopted by the State Woman's Rights Convention, held at Albany, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 14 & 15, 1854. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1854. 20 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Miss A arranged for this address, had copies printed and laid on desks of every member (Anthony adds "of the Legislature.")

According to the appendix, on February 20, 1854, petitions that had been approved at the Rochester Convention, December 1, 1853, were presented. One, signed by nearly 6,000 men and women, requested that the NY statutes be amended to establish legal equality of women with men; another, signed by over 4,000 men and women, requested that the state constitution be amended to secure equal suffrage for women.

 


Preston, Ann.
Introductory lecture, to the course of instruction in the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, for the session 1855-6. Philadelphia, Printed by A. E. M'Dowell, 1855. 16 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28009006

Ann Preston (1813-1872), who graduated in the first class of the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and became its first female professor and first female dean, was a leader in women's medical education.

 


Consistent Democracy. The Elective Franchise for women. Twenty Five Testimonies of Prominent Men. Worcester, 1858. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes testimonies of Henry Ward Beecher, William Lloyd Garrison, Thomas W. Higginson, Samuel E. Sewall and Gerrit Smith.

 


Addresses on mental culture for women, by Rev. Henry Ward Beecher and James T. Brady, esq. Delivered in New York, October twenty-sixth, 1858 in Pulpit and Rostrum, No. 2. New York, E. D. Barker, 1859. 26 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018615

Beecher (1813-1887) and Brady (1815-1869) spoke in support of efforts to encourage employers to reduce working women's hours and to establish a library for working women that would include a reading room and instruction toward improvement in their working opportunities.

 


Woman's rights almanac for 1858. Containing facts, statistics, arguments, records of progress, and proofs of the need of it. Worcester, Mass.: Z. Baker & co., 1857. 36 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/10009032

Anthony identifies Thomas W. Higginson as the compiler. Includes excerpts of a 1857 speech by Lucy Stone reporting state legislative progress, favorable reports from Ohio and Wisconsin legislatures, and 1850 statistics on male and female wages in cotton and woolen factories and teaching.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
It is so unlady-like. By E. C. S. n. p., n. d.. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stanton applauds women who succeed in men's roles in crisis situations as well as the crusading spirit of Abby Kelley (1811-1887), controversial radical abolitionist organizer.

 


Higginson, Thomas W.
Ought women to learn the alphabet? Abridged from the Atlantic Monthly for February 1859. 1859. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Higginson believes a new era has come and that women and men should have equal opportunity. All should learn the alphabet, be able to acquire property, and be allowed to vote.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
I have all the rights I want. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/94841884

Stanton considers this statement to be false. No woman has all the rights she needs for herself or for her less fortunate sisters.

 


Bodichon, Barbara Leigh Smith.
Women and Work. With an introduction by Catharine M. Sedgwick. New York: C. S. Francis & Co., 1859. 35 p.
HQ1111 .M5 no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Sedgwick encourages women to prepare for domestic management to support husband and children or single independence through teaching, medicine, or social charities.

English feminist Barbara Bodichon (1827-1891) advocates for professional training for women as nurses, doctors, journalists, teachers, and artists.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
The Slave's Appeal. Albany: Anti-Slavery Depository, 1860. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


American Board and American Slavery. Speech of Theodore Tilton, in Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, January 28, 1860. 1860. 44 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Nell, William Cooper.
Property qualification or no property qualification : a few facts from the record of patriotic services of the colored men of New York, during the wars of 1776 and 1812, with a compendium of their present business, and property statistics. New York : For sale by Thomas Hamilton, 48 Beekman Street, and Wm. H. Leonard, 5 Beekman Street, 1860. 24 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000076

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, on the divorce bill, before the Judiciary Committee of the New York Senate in the Assembly Chamber, Feb. 8, 1861. Albany : Weed, Parsons and Co., 1861. 14 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 20A (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000077

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Free Speech by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, at the Fourth Annual N.Y. State Anti-Slavery Convention at Association Hall, Albany, N.Y., February 4th and 5th, 1861. 1861. 4 p. Mutilated..
HQ1114 .M5 no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

This speech was given several times at anti-slavery meetings in New York in reaction to the treatment Stanton and Anthony had received in Buffalo in January 1861 where their meeting was interrupted by an unruly mob.

 


Equal rights for all ... [Speech by] George William Curtis in the New York State Constitutional convention, 1867. Rochester, N.Y.: New York State Constitutional Convention Campaign Committee, 1867. 24 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000074

Headquarters of the campaign committee is listed as 17 Madison St., Rochester, Anthony's residence.

George William Curtis (1824-1892), writer and social reformer, objects to women being classed with lunatics and felons and offers justification for his amendment that calls for equal suffrage in the New York Constitution.

 


Mill, John Stuart.
Equal Rights Tract No. 6. Suffrage for Women. Speech of John Stuart Mill in the British Parliament, on the Household Suffrage Bill, May 20th, 1867. New York: American Equal Rights Association, 1867. 16 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

John Stuart Mill's amendment to extend suffrage to women lost, 73 to 196.

Lists tracts available from Anthony, Secretary of American Equal Rights Association, 37 Park Row, New York.

 


Beecher, Henry Ward. Woman's duty to vote : Speech by Henry Ward Beecher at the eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention, held in New York, May 10, 1866. New York : Office of The Revolution, 1868. 31 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000073

Beecher contends that it is woman's duty to participate in public affairs and that when she wants it and demands it, it will be granted. Includes Beecher's remarks in 1857 calling for universal suffrage for women and blacks.

 


Hooker, John.
Tracts of Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association. No. 1 The Bible and Woman Suffrage. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 1870. 17 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 25 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 09005161

John Hooker (1816-1901), Hartford lawyer and court reporter was the husband of Isabella Beecher Hooker and a vice president of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, which Isabella founded. Hooker contends that scriptural authority is not against woman suffrage and that Christ's teachings encourage equality of men and women at home and in the state.

There is no HQ114.M5 no. 26.

 


Hickox, George A.
Tracts of Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association. No. 1 Legal Disabilities of Married Women in Connecticut. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 1871. 40 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 27 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

George Hickox (1830-1903), lawyer, publisher of the Litchfield Enquirer, and a vice president of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, cites common law and statutes in outlining a husband's legal right to custody of his wife, their children, and her property. He contends that these laws lead to repression of the development of females and advocates for greater independence and joint responsibility that would produce a superior type of womanhood.

 


Butts, Bryan J.
Material independence of Woman. Hopedale, Mass., 1871. 16 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 28 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Miss Carroll's claim before Congress in connection with the Tennessee Campaign of 1862. Washington, 1873. 55 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 29 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000071

Anna Ella Carroll (1815-1894), political lobbyist and advisor to Lincoln, alleged that she had suggested the plan for the Tennessee Campaign and should be compensated for her military service. Although her memorial included testimonials from influential men in government, it was years before a small pension was finally granted to Carroll for her Civil War service.

 


Seward, William H.
Speech of William H. Seward at Detroit, September 4, 1860. n. p., n. d.. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 30 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Senator William H. Seward (1801-1872), campaigning for Lincoln and the Republican Party, calls for limiting slavery to the original slave states and not permitting it to be extended to the territories.

 


Sumner, Charles.
No compromise of human rights. No admission in the Constitution of inequality of rights, or disfranchisement on account of color. Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, on the proposed amendment of the constitution fixing the basis of representation; delivered in the Senate of the United States, March 7, 1866. Washington, Printed at the Congressional globe office, 1866. 22 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 31 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/18019776

Inscribed: Hon. Charles Sumner said to me in 1870-"Take my speeches on the floor of the senate on 'Equal Rights to All', and put 'sex' where I have 'color' and you will have the best and strongest argument for woman's right to vote." Susan B. Anthony.

And Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker says he said the same thing to her at a later date. Susan B. Anthony Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Sumner, Charles.
Powers of Congress to Prohibit Inequality, Caste, and Oligarchy of the Skin. Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, delivered in the Senate of the United States, February 5, 1869. Washington: Rives & Bailey, 1869. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 32 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This is one of the speeches of Senator Sumner of which he said to me in 1870 when I asked him to decla[re pub]licly that the U. S. Constitution guaranteed to women the right to vote-"Take this & put 'sex' where I have 'color,' and you will have the strongest argument [several works cropped] Susan B. Anthony.

 


Sumner, Charles.
Equality before the Law. Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, on his supplementary civil rights bill; delivered in the Senate of the United States, January 15, 1872. Washington: Rives & Bailey, Printers, 1872. 15 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 33 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Ferrin, Mary Upton.
Woman's Defence: A Repy to Horace Greeley's Lecture, recently delivered in Providence, R. I. Peabody: Charles D. Howard, 1869. 16 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 34 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Gage, Joslyn.
Woman's rights catechism. n. p., 1871. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 35 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018622

First page is an advertisement for lectures by M. Joselyn Gage.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address in favor of universal suffrage, for the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Before the Judiciary committees of the Legislature of New York, in the Assembly chamber, January 23, 1867, in behalf of the American equal rights association. Albany: Weed, Parsons and company, printers, 1867. 24 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 36 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018621

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
The Mortality of Nations: An address delivered before the American Equal Rights Association, in New York, Thursday Evening, May 9 1867. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1867. 13 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 37 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Train, George Francis.
Great epigram campaign of Kansas. Championship of woman. By George Francis Train. The revolution ... Thirty speeches in two weeks in all parts of Kansas . . . Leavenworth, Kans.: Prescott & Hume, Daily Commercial Office, 1867. 64 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 38 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018619

A newspaper clipping pasted on the inside cover lists dates of fourteen Kansas suffrage meetings in October and November 1867 where George Francis Train and M. W. Reynolds were scheduled to speak. Below it is this inscription:

And Susan B. Anthony attended all of these meetings with Mr. Train-Mr M. W. Reynolds having gone off on a Buffalo Hunt. With all of Mr. Train's oddities, he would make speeches on womans wrongs that could be equaled only by John B. Gough himself. Whether my doing so meets the approval of future generations or not, let them remember that no other man-except Parker Pillsbury and Robert Purvis-stood with us through this fearfully alone period for Mrs. Stanton and myself. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. Jan. 1, 1903.

In addition to his stump work on the 1867 Kansas suffrage campaign, eccentric Boston businessman George Francis Train (1829-1904) financially helped launch Anthony's suffrage newspaper, The Revolution, in 1868.

Robert Purvis (1810-1898) was an African American abolitionist. John B. Gough (1817-1886) was a temperance orator. M. W. Reynolds was publisher of the Daily State Journal, a Lawrence, Kansas, Democratic newspaper.

Faced with a strong anti-woman suffrage campaign by Kansas Republicans and lack of support among Democrats, Anthony and suffrage activists failed in their efforts to win the November 1867 referendum to amend the Kansas constitution to permit woman suffrage.

 


Newman, Francis.
Lecture on women's suffrage, delivered in the Guildhall, Bath, on January 28th, 1870, His Worship the Mayor presiding. Bristol [England] I. Arrowsmith, printer, 1870. 16 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 39 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018618

 


Grey, Marie Georgina
Is the exercise of the suffrage unfeminine? By Mrs. William Grey. London: Printed by Spottiswoode & Co., 1870. 12 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 40 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/28018617

 


Grover, A. J.
Bible Argument against Woman Stated and Answered from a Bible standpoint. Earlville, Illinois: Cook County Woman's Franchise Association, 1870. 23 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 41 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Jones, John Andrew.
Social Evil. Washington, D.C., The author, 1871. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 42 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/08037584

Jones, who dedicates his speech to the Woman's Club of Washington, D. C., advocates early marriage as means to eradicating prostitution and supports extending the vote to women.

 


Spencer, Sara (Mrs. H. C.)
Problems on the Woman Question, social, political, and scriptural. Washington: Langran, Ogilvie & Co., 1871. [6 p.] 17 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 43 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Anthony identifies the author as "Sarah (sic) J. Spencer."

 


District of Columbia.
Laws, statutes, etc. H. D. No. 94. A Bill to regulate and suppress houses of ill-fame. Washington, D. C., 1871. 5 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 44 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000079

Proposed legislation would require police commissioners to compile a list of all bawdy houses and the occupants for use by police and Board of Health and require weekly visits by an assigned physician for sanitary inspection, to inquire regarding the causes leading to prostitution and to assist any that desire to abandon that life.

 


Petition of George P. Fisher, A. G. Riddle, A. W. Scharit, James H. Stone, and others, asking for the establishment of an industrial home, a reform school for girls, and a home for children born out of wedlock. Washington, Government printing office, 1873. 7 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 45 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 26000178

Inscribed in unknown hand: Written and submitted for signatures by Mrs. Sara J. Spencer, Pres. Womans Club, 308 A st. N. E.

Petition suggests that in addition to public funds, the expenses should be supported by wages of those trained in the school and contributions by the fathers of the children. Prominent men and women signed the petition, including Sara J. Spencer, principal of the ladies department, business college, Mary E. Walker, MD, and other female doctors, several officials of Freedman's Bank, Lewis and Frederick Douglass, Jr. of New National Era, W. F Bascom of Howard University and public officials, lawyers and teachers.

 


Should Women Vote! Important Affirmative Testimony. n. p., 1874. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 46 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Annotated by Anthony: Circulated in the Michigan campaign amendment in 1874

Includes quotes from prominent supporters of equal suffrage including U.S. Senators B. F. Wade and H. B. Anthony, Henry Ward Beecher, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Wendell Philips, Gerrit Smith, and John Stuart Mill.

 


Citizens' Suffrage Association. Burnham, Carrie S., comp.
Tract No. 5. Compilation . . . made by order of the Citizens' suffrage association [of Philadelphia] to show the difference between those laws that men make for themselves, and those that they make for their mothers, wives, sisters and daughters. Shoemakertown, Pa., Cheltenham Press, Hallowell, Steam-power Printer, 1874. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 47 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 26000176

Caroline Burnham (1838-1909), leader of Philadelphia Citizens' suffrage association and the suffrage committee of International Workingmen's Association, fought for woman suffrage through legislative and constitutional reform and by testing judicial interpretation. After many years of persistent effort she became in 1883 the first woman to receive a University of Pennsylvania law degree and in 1890 was admitted to practice law before the U. S. Supreme Court.

 


Citizens' Suffrage Association.
Tract no. 7. Constitution of the Citizen's Suffrage Association; Right to vote. Philadelphia?, 1874. 4 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 48 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 26000175

This association, which was an auxiliary of the National Woman Suffrage Association, contended that suffrage for women was needed to secure suffrage for men.

 


Burnham, Carrie S.
Suffrage--the citizen's birthright. An address delivered before the Constitutional convention of Pennsylvania, January 16th, 1873. Philadelphia, Cooperative printing co., 1873. 11 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 49 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000080

Burnham's arguments fell on deaf ears, as the Constitutional convention voted to explicitly limit the right of suffrage to males.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Memorial of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Isabella Beecher Hooker, Elizabeth L. Bladen, Olympia Brown, Susan B. Anthony, and Josephine L. Griffing to the Congress of the United States and the arguments thereon before the Judiciary Committee of the U. S. Senate by Isabella Beecher Hooker, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony, Washington, January 12, 1872. Washington, D. C., Chronicle Publishing Company, 1872. 30 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 50 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Gage, Matilda Joslyn and Sara J. Spencer.
Arguments before the Committee on the District of Columbia of the United States Senate and House of Representatives upon the Centennial Woman Suffrage Memorial of the women citizens of this nation. Washington, D. C. Gibson Brothers, Printers, 1876. 12 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 51 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

As President of the National Woman Suffrage Association, Gage presents a memorial of women citizens requesting suffrage for the women of the District of Columbia in the Centennial year.

 


Miller, Francis.
Argument before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives upon the Petition of 600 Citizens asking for the Enfranchisement of the Women of the District of Columbia, Jan. 21, 1874, by Francis Miller, esq., associate counsel with Hon A. G. Riddle in the case of Sara J. Spencer vs. the Board of registration, and Mary Webster vs. the judges of election, now pending in the Supreme Court of the United States. Washington, D. C., Gibson Brothers, printers, 1874. 8 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 52 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Privileges and Elections.
Arguments in behalf of the sixteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States, prohibiting the several states from disenfranchising United States citizens on account of sex . . . by twelve delegates of the National Woman Suffrage Association, in behalf of 40,000 petitioners, January 11 and 12, 1878; and Protest against woman suffrage to the same Committee by Madeleine Vinton Dahlgren: also, Majority [report] of same committee against said Constitutional Amendment, June 14, 1878, and Minority [report] of same Committee in favor of said Constitutional Amendment, February 1, 1879. Washington, D. C., Government Printing Office, 1879. 2 p., 45 p., 10 p.
HQ1114 .M5 no. 53 & 54 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/09018687

Reissued from Government Printing Office plates by the National Woman Suffrage Association.

 


Washington's valedictory address to the people of the United States, published in September, A.D. 1796 : together with the Declaration of Independence. Harrisburg : Boas & Coplan, printers, 1839. 22 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/94841885

On spine: Tracts and speeches; woman's rights.

Printed on fly leaf: Anna H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa.

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, O. 4. 22

First of forty items annotated by Anthony with typescript table of contents annotated by Anthony (2p), which also lists five titles not in this volume.

No. 1 Inscribed: This address is old and venerated. Nothing can exceed it in these days. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Herttell, Thomas.
Remarks comprising in substance Judge Herttell's argument in the House of Assembly of the state of New York, in the session of 1837, in support of the bill to restore to married women "The Right of Property," as guaranteed by the constitution of this state. New York, 1839. Re-published by order of the will of Mrs. Barbara Amelia Herttell. Boston : J.P. Mendum, 1867. 83 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/94841886

Inscribed: Mr. Herttells is the author of the 1st Property Rights bill in New York in 1837. It was therefore 11 years before it became a law. Mrs. Rose, Mrs. Paulina Wright Davis, Miss Lydia Mott of Albany, N.Y. and Mrs. Stanton labored for this bill. Mrs Rose got only six names to a petition-how is that for just maried women to own their own property? Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1902 (sic.)

Thomas Herttell (1771-1849), a freethinker and New York City judge, proposed the first married women's property legislation to the New York Assembly in 1837.

Rose's petition in support of married women's property rights was one of the first actions by the feminist reformer Ernestine Rose (1810-1892) after emigrating from Poland via London in 1836. New York's Married Property Rights Act of 1848 became a model for other states' legislation

 


Biography, and notes of Frances Wright D'Arusmont. [From the Dundee, Scotland, Northern Star. 1844]. Boston: Printed by J. P. Mendum, 1849. 48 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/04010962

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903
Annotated in blue pencil by Anthony.

 


Catalogue of the teachers and pupils of the Saint Paul Street Female Seminary. Rochester, Shepard & Strong's Press, 1840. 8 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk81030584

In her index, Anthony lists Miss Mary B. Allen, the seminary principal, as author.

In addition to listing teachers and pupils, the catalogue outlines the course of study, text books, and tuition for year ending August 1840.

 


May, Samuel J.
The rights and condition of women considered in "The Church of the Messiah," November 8, 1846. Syracuse: Stoddard & Babcock, 1846. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Samuel May (1797-1871) served as Unitarian minister at Church of the Messiah from 1845 to 1868. A leading abolitionist, May's ardent advocacy of total equality extended to women's rights and equality in education.

 


Mott, Lucretia.
Discourse on Woman, delivered at the Assembly Buildings, December 17, 1849. Philadelphia: W. P. Kildare, 1869. 22 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Lucretia Coffin Mott (1793-1880), Quaker minister, abolitionist and woman suffragist, argues that equality between the sexes is supported by the scriptures.

 


Walker, Timothy.
Legal condition of women. From the Western Law Journal. Western Law Journal, 1849. 15 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/94841887

Anthony dated this item as January 1849.

Timothy Walker (1806-1856), author of the acclaimed Introduction to American Law and editor of the Western Law Journal, suggests that women's legal right to hold property and make contracts is gradually improving, but political rights to suffrage and office holding will continue to be denied, except for the power of women's ability to persuade and influence.

 


Phillips, Wendell.
Freedom for women, Speech of Wendell Phillips, esq., at the convention held at Worcester, October 15 and 16, 1851. n. p., n. d.. 21 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82024756

 


Severance, Caroline M.
Woman's rights Advocate, No. 1. Ohio Woman's Rights Association, Cleveland: Press of Harris, Fairbanks & co., 1852. 22 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83031319

Caroline M. Severance (1820-1914), woman suffragist, continued to organize women and support women's issues throughout her life.

 


Douglass, Frederick.
Oration, Delivered in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, by Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852. Rochester: Lee, Mann & Co., 1852. 39 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Below a printed request by Susan F. Porter, President, Rochester Anti Slavery Sewing Society, that Douglass furnish 100 copies of this speech for distribution is Anthony's inscription:
Mrs. Porter was the wife of Samuel D. Porter. She was a beautiful woman, refined, cultivated-one whom always admired Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan 1 1902

 


Smith, Elizabeth Oakes.
Woman's Rights Tracts, No. 5. Sanctity of marriage. Syracuse: Lathrop's Print, 185?. 8 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82109188

Elizabeth Oakes Smith (1806-1893) wrote and lectured on women's rights during the decade of the 1850s. In this essay on marriage, first printed in the New York Tribune in March 1851 as Woman and Her Needs. No. VI, she advocates for equality in marriage, not to be undertaken before reaching majority.

 


Parker, Theodore.
Public function of woman. A sermon by Theodore Parker, preached at the Music hall, Boston, March 27, 1853. New York: Office of The Revolution, 1868. 24 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk85025134

Theodore Parker (1810-1860) contends that to limit women to the role of housekeeper, wife and mother, is to waste positive energies that could improve public affairs.

 


Lee, Luther.
Woman's right to preach the gospel. A sermon, preached at the ordination of the Rev. Miss Antoinette L. Brown, at South Butler, Wayne County, N.Y., Sept. 15, 1853. Syracuse, N.Y.: Published by the author, 1853. 22 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/tmp83029911

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady
It is so unlady-like by E. C. S. n. p., 1873?. 4 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82052857

Dated "1853" by Susan B. Anthony

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address to the Legislature of New-York, adopted by the State Women's Rights Convention, held at Albany . . . . February 14 and 15, 1854. Albany: Weed, Parson and Company, 1854. 20 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Higginson, Thomas W.
Ought women to learn the alphabet? : abridged from the Atlantic monthly, for February, 1859. United States: s.n., 1859?. 4 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/94841883

 


Butts, Bryan J.
Material independence of woman. Hopedale, Mass., 1871. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000072

Anthony suggests 1858 as date.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Free speech by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, at the Fourth Annual N.Y. State Anti-Slavery Convention, at Association Hall, Albany, N.Y., February 4th and 5th, 1861. Albany? N.Y., 1861. 4 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ca 30000075

Inscribed by Anthony: Written at the farm home of S. B. A. and first attempt to be delivered at the Rochester Con. Jan. 11th 1861.

 


Evans, Elwood.
Oration by Elwood Evans, Portland, Oregon, July 4th, 1865. n. p., n. d.. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Woman suffrage association of Missouri.
Constitution and by-laws of the Woman suffrage association of Missouri. St. Louis, Neue welt print, 1870. 8 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk81051152

 


Seldon, Henry R.
Right of women to vote. Argument of Henry R. Seldon in behalf of Susan B. Anthony, on habeas corpus, before the Hon. N. K. Hall, U. S. district judge for the Northern district of New York, at Albany, January 21, 1873. n. p., 1873?. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk85020566

 


Mill, John Stuart.
Equal Rights Tract, No. 6. Speech by John Stuart Mill, in the British Parliament, on the household suffrage bill, May 20th, 1867. New York: Office of The Revolution, 1868. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83009225

 


Curtis, George William.
Equal Rights for All. George William Curtis in the New York State Constitutional Convention, 1867. New York State Constitutional Convention Campaign Committee, Rochester, N.Y., 1867?. 24 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Mott, Lucretia.
Discourse by Lucretia Mott. At the Second Unitarian Church, Brooklyn ...November 24th, 1867. n. p., 1867. p. 12-18.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82003012

 


Stone, Lucy and Henry Blackwell.
Woman suffrage in New Jersey. n. p., 1867?. 3 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 25 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83031320

 


Riddle, Albert Gallatin.
Social evil. Remarks of Mr. Riddle, to the mass meeting of the Woman's Club, at Lincoln hall, September 22, 1871. Washington, D. C., 1871. 3 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 26 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/20018565

Albert Riddle (1816-1902), District lawyer and former Ohio Congressman, contends that prostitution would disappear once equality of the sexes is established.

 


Hooker, John.
Tracts of Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association: The Bible and Woman Suffrage. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 1871. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 27 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association.
Annual Meeting of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, held at Hartford, September 9, 1870. Report of the Executive Committee, Isabella B. Hooker, Chairman. Hartford: Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 1871. 24 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 28 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Gage, Matilda Joslyn.
Woman as Inventor. Fayetteville, N.Y.: New York State Woman Suffrage Association, 1870. 32 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 29 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Gage, Matilda Joslyn.
National Citizen Tract no. 1. Who planned the Tennessee Campaign of 1862? Syracuse: National Citizen, 1880. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no.30 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Should women vote? Important affirmative authority. Rochester, N.Y.: W. S. Falls, 1874?. 4 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no.31 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83003538

Annotated by Anthony: Used in Mich. Cam, 1874

Includes testimonials supporting woman suffrage by suffragists, ministers, and politicians.

 


Smith, Julia E.
Abby Smith and her cows with a report of the law case decided contrary to law. Hartford, Conn., 1877. 94 p. front..
HQ1114 .T7 no. 32 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes excerpts from newspaper coverage of events related to Abby Smith (1797-1878) and Julia Smith (1792-1886) refusing to pay Glastonbury, Conn. property taxes because they were denied a vote in assessing and expending town taxes. Frontispiece shows Abby with four of the seven cows, seized and sold for property taxes, along with two calves named "Martha Washington" and "Abigail Adams." Compilation includes Abby Smith's 1873 and 1874 speeches before Glastonbury town meetings, Julia and Abby's letters to the press, and reports of the 1876 court case regarding unlawful seizure of their land for taxes, which was ultimately decided in their favor.

 


Petition of ______ for relief from political disabilities. Issued by National Woman Suffrage Association n. p., 1878?. 1 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 33 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82081862

Blank form sample petition to U. S. Congress, requesting woman suffrage as a right of citizenship. Instructions to women citizens of the U. S. urge them to use it as a model petition and to send to the National Woman Suffrage Association before February 1, 1878, all hand-written, signed petitions addressed to the Senate and House of Representatives.

 


Turner, Eliza S.
Four quite new reasons why you should wish your wife to vote. Philadelphia, Issued by the Pennsylvania woman suffrage association, 1875. 10 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 34 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82035335

Eliza Sproat Turner (1826-1903), writer and social reformer, was a founder of the Pennsylvania woman suffrage association and a leader in several Philadelphia women's organizations.

 


Hoyt, John W.
Address of Gov. John W. Hoyt, of Wyoming territory, upon woman suffrage in Wyoming. Delivered at Association hall, Philadelphia, April 3, 1882. Philadelphia? National Woman Suffrage Association, 1882. 22 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 35 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/tmp80003637

John Wesley Hoyt (1831-1912), governor of Wyoming territory 1878-1892, reports the positive results of woman suffrage in Wyoming, including better laws, better officers, and better schools.

 


Munger, George C.
Shall women vote? An argument in favor of Woman Suffrage by Hon. George G. Munger of New York City. New York: L. K. Strouse & co., 1882. 30 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 36 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/09032770

Annotated by Anthony with marginal blue pencil lines.

 


Minor, Francis.
Woman's legal right to the ballot: An argument in support of. By Francis Minor of the St. Louis Bar. Reprinted from the New Magazine, The Forum. December, 1886. The Forum, 1886. 10 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 37 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83031318

Lawyer Francis Minor (1820-1892) here contends that by the citizenship clause of the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution women have dual citizenship and as federal citizens have a right to vote for federal officers and that states can only limit suffrage for state officers. He had cited the citizenship clause in representing his wife Virginia in her 1872 voting rights case against Missouri in which the Supreme Court upheld suffrage as a state right.

 


Ingalls, John J.
Sixteenth amendment by Senator J. J. Ingalls. Reprint from the new review, The Forum, September, 1887. The Forum, 1887. 13 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 38 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/tmp91001680

Inscribed: Miss Susan B. Anthony, with the regards of John J. Ingalls

John James Ingalls (1833-1900), Kansas politician and U. S. Senator, 1873-1891, did not support a suffrage amendment to the Constitution, contending that woman suffrage was the domain of state legislatures. He argues against increasing the number of illiterate voters and contends that the majority of women do not want to vote.

 


Waite, Charles B.
Suffrage a right of citizenship . . . . Published . . . from advance sheets of The Chicago Law Times for July 1887. Chicago: C. V. Waite & Co, 1887. 12 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 39 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk85015319

Charles B. Waite (1824-1909) was a Chicago lawyer and former associate justice of the supreme court of the Utah territory. He contends that suffrage is a right of citizenship that existed before state legislatures or the federal constitution.

 


Waite, Charles B.
Who were voters in the early history of this country? Printed from advance sheets of The Chicago Law Times for October 1888. Chicago: C.V. Waite & Co, 1888. 16 p.
HQ1114 .T7 no. 40 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Waite asserts that women had the right to elective franchise by common law in England and in the colonies well into the 19th century, which should be restored by striking the word "male" from state constitutions and amending the federal constitution.

 


Farnham, Eliza Wood.
Woman and her era. New York: A. J. Davis & Co., 1864. 2 v. in 1. 2d.ed.
HQ1206 .F23 1864a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17002135

Signed: Asa Anthony

Inscribed: This distant cousin of my father-Daniel Anthony-and the son of Daniel Anthony of Saratoga Co. New York-so that they were called Saratoga County Daniel and Washington County Daniel. This book is presented to me by Maria Anthony-the daughter of Asa & Huldah Griffin Anthony--of Rochester N. Y. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., Feb. 15. 1893-

And now presented to the Congressional Library, Washington D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Eliza Farnham (1815-1864), American writer and feminist, was an advocate of female superiority. Although not embracing the methods of the women's rights movement, she supported any progress that enabled mothers and homemakers in their role to provide moral and spiritual guidance.

 


Cobbe, Frances Power.
The Duties of Women. A Course of Lectures. Political Science Study Series, Vol. 4, No. 1. New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1898. 161 p.
HQ1221 .C65 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14005851

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

British ethics writer Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904) was an influential defender of women's and animal rights. She condemned the degradation of women, particularly male violence against married women, arguing that marriage often deprived women of resources and made them dependent on men. She believed that women's higher education and political emancipation were essential means to women fulfilling their social duty to contribute to the virtue and happiness of mankind by facilitating social reform. These lectures were originally given in London in 1879 and published in 1881. Noting that the women's movement is in a critical transitional period of uplift, she warns that the conduct of women themselves will determine whether progress is sustainable. She then prescribes rules of appropriate feminist conduct, claiming that women's domestic activity guarantees the rightness of feminist political activity. Duties of Women was reprinted by feminist and suffrage activists in Great Britain and the United States because of its potential appeal to women who might not initially identify as feminists. See Susan Hamilton's Frances Power Cobbe and Victorian Feminism, 2006.

 


Burr, William Henry.
Thomas Paine was Junius. Washington, D.C., 1880 [1881]. 28 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/04015992

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

First of nine pamphlets bound together

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, O.4.22.

Front cover stamped in gold: S. B. Anthony.

Hand printed inside front cover: Anna H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa.

 


Paine, Thomas.
Common sense, original appendix, and Crisis for 1776. New York : G. Vale, 1850. 48; 10; [3] ill..
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139689

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester [N.Y.] Jan.1, 1903.

Portrait of Thomas Paine is pasted on the verso of the title page. Includes Catalogue of works for sale by G. Vale, 3 p.

 


Burr, William Henry.
A Roman Catholic canard. A fabricated account of a scene at the death-bed of Thomas Paine. Did Bishop Fenwick write it? Boston: J. P. Mendum, 1883. 16 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/04015993

Inscription, partially cropt: . . .among my Paine [one word?] Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Wright, Frances.
Biography, Notes, and Political Letters of Frances Wright D'Arusmont. New York: John Windt, 1844. no.1, 48 p. no. 2, 47 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk81013666

No. 1 Inscibed: Frances Wright was the first woman who really entered a political campaign-in 1828. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N. Y., Jan 1. 1903

No. 2 Inscribed: A wonderfully far seeing woman. She saw that sectarianism must not be allowed any part in our educational system. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Rose, Ernestine L.
Lecture on woman's rights, delivered before the People's Sunday Meeting, in Cochituate Hall, Boston, on Sunday, October 19th, 1851. Boston : J.P. Mendum, 1886. 20 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139717

Inscribed on front cover: Ernestine L. Rose with best wishes.

Inscribed on title page: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Ernestine Rose (1810-1892), Polish-born feminist, lectured throughout the U. S. on women's equality, married women's property rights, and abolition of slavery.

 


Rose, Ernestine L.
Two addresses delivered by Mrs. Ernestine L. Rose at the Bible Convention, held in Hartford, (Conn.), in June 1854: being her replies to the Rev. Mr. Turner, accompanied with comments on the unreasonable character of the Bible. Boston: J.P. Mendum, 1888. 46 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139737

Inscribed: Brave & fearless of all women-Mrs. Rose. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Rose contends that the Bible is based on error and superstition and is not the word of any God. Furthermore, it is a source of subjugation of women. To be free “you must trample the Bible, the church, and the priests under your feet.”

 


Rose, Ernestine L.
Defence of atheism : being a lecture, delivered in Mercantile Hall, Boston, April 10, 1861. Third edition. Boston : J.P. Mendum, 1889. 24 p.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139766

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Rose contends that belief in God and religion has not made man better. Man should seek truth and justice because it is right, not for hope of a future reward.

Following this pamphlet are clippings from the Boston Investigator: August 17, 1892, Obituary of Ernestine L. Rose and August 24, 1892, Funeral of Ernestine L. Rose.

 


Influence, rights and appeal of women. Albany: C. Van Benthuysen, 1842.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139791

Inscribed on yellow paper cover: Save & Return. Susan B. Anthony

Inscribed on half title: This book published as early as 1812!! Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Includes extracts from various writers in support of women's rights. John Milton on Divorce appears first. Publication could be no earlier than 1836, thus 1842 more likely than 1812.

 


Condition, influence, rights and appeal of women : from Joseph A. Segur, Mary Wollstonecraft, Matthew Carey, L. Aime Martin, Thomas Hertell, William Thompson, Alexander Walker, John Milton, and other philogynists. Fourth edition. Albany : [s.n.], 1847.
HQ1236 .A58 1881 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139795

Inscribed on green paper cover: [?cropt] with cordial regards of his friend, F. Hutchins

Inscribed on recto of frontise: This is from my Friend Lydia Mott, Albany, N.Y. and are among the earliest of the movement in New York. It was from 1837-1848 that the agitation was continued before the law was obtained -and Judge Wm. Hays of Saratoga-that of all the talk against giving women the suffrage--there was none to match that of allowing women to own & dispose of their own property. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Includes the same extracts from various writers in support of women's rights as HQ1236.A58. no. 8, but in different order. Includes Thomas Hertell's 1836 resolution in the New York Assembly to protect the rights and property of married women.

 


Biography, notes, and political letters of Frances Wright D'Arusmont . . . New York: John Windt, 1844. 48 p.
HQ1413 .D2 A3 1844 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk81013666

Inscribed in unknown hand: S. B. Anthony

Stamped: Gift of May Wright Sewall by Ida Husted Harper, Literary executor. 1923

 


Dublin Women's Suffrage & Local Government Association.
The following List of the Women elected under the Local Government Act of 1899 . . . Dublin, 1899. 4 p.
HQ1593 .D78 1899 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: P. Susan B. Anthony 21 Apr '03

 


Dublin Women's Suffrage & Local Government Association.
Suggestions for intending Women Workers under the Local Government Act. Dublin, 1899. 8 p.
HQ1593 .D785 1899 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: P. Susan B. Anthony 21 Apr '03

 


Mill, John Stuart.
Subjection of women. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott & co., 1869. 174 p.
HQ1596 .M52 1869 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16012356

Inscribed: This has been the law at least with me ever since 1869. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N. Y., Jan 1. 1903

British philosopher John Stuart Mill, (1806-1873) was one of the first male advocates for woman suffrage. In Subjection, he argues that legal subordination of one sex hinders human improvement and should be replaced by perfect equality.

 


Wollstonecraft, Mary.
Vindication of the rights of woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects. By Mary Wollstonecraft. Printed at Boston, by Peter Edes for Thomas and Andrews, Faust's statue, no. 45, Newbury-street, 1792.
HQ1596 .W6 1792a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15011328

Inscribed in unknown hand: Samuel Porter 2d, July 28th 1804

Inscribed by Anthony: Presented to Susan B. Anthony by Maria G. Porter, Rochester N.Y. August 1881. This was published in 1792.

Further Inscribed: Presented to the Library of Congress by a great admirer of this earliest word for women's Right to Equality of rights ever penned by a woman. As Ralph Waldo Emerson said "A Wholesome discontent is the first step toward progress." And here in 1892 (sic) we have the first step-so thinks Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1904

Inscribed by Anthony on separate slip of paper, stamped by Library Jan 2, 1904 : These two books are The memories of Mary Wollstonecraft by Goodwin (sic)-and the Vindication of the rights of woman-the latter written 1792 the former in 1804. S. B. A.

This Vindication by English feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (1759-1797) was embraced by Anthony and other suffragists because it encouraged economic independence and political activism for women and called for equal education for both genders.

 


Ethelmer, Ellis.
Woman free. Congleton, England: Women's Emancipation Union, 1893. 222, xvi p.
HQ1597 .E7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16004204

Inscribed by the author: To Susan B. Anthony, with esteem and gratitude for her lifelong efforts in the cause of womanhood and of humanity. Ellis Ethelmer. Congleton, 25 June, 1899

Inscribed by Anthony : Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. From Mrs. Wolstenholme Elmy, London, Eng. July 1899

Inscribed by Anthony: Mrs. Elmy, with Mrs. Jacob Bright were the main workers in getting the Married Women's Property act of 1882-83 passed by the British Parliament. Presented to the Congressional Library by Susan B. Anthony, Dec. 25. 1902

Elizabeth Clarke Wolstenholme Elmy, (1833-1918), a radical British women's rights activist, ardently campaigned for legislative reforms to improve higher education for women, married women's property rights and women's franchise from the 1860s onward for over forty years. Her husband Ben Elmy supported her reform efforts and wrote several books on sex education as well as this feminist poem under the pseudonym Ellis Ethelmer. This poem, which champions complete equality between the sexes, is supplemented by extensive notes that quote a wide array of feminist authorities.

Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Elmy were both in London in July 1899 to attend a meeting of the International Council of Women.

 


The Sphere of Women. London: Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1895. 2 p.
HQ1597 .S65 1895 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: Susan B. Anthony, 21 Ap '03

Contends that women's sphere should be limited only by their capacity and not by artificial barriers of law, custom or prejudice.

 


Armistead, Wilson, comp.
A "Cloud of Witnesses" against Slavery and Oppression. London: W. Tweedie, 1853. 14 p.
HT1033 .A75 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17004883

Inscribed in an unknown hand: Miss Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y.

Inscribed: This is indication of how much my thought was upon Slavery in those early years. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Wilson Armistead (1819-1868), Quaker businessman and leader of the Leeds, England, Anti-slavery Association, compiled and published 82 anti-slavery tracts, as well as several books. Armistead believed that distribution of such tracts could help to educate the masses of the evils of slavery. Armistead offers authoritative opinions collected from various sources to demonstrate that slavery and Christianity are incompatible.

 


Stewart, Louisa and Jessie Allen Fowler.
Memoir of Margaret Bright Lucas, president of the British women's temperance association. London, British women's temperance association, 189?. 82 p. front. (port.).
HV5218 .L7 S6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/18003884

Inscribed: From Mrs. Katharine Lucas Thomasson, the only daughter of my dear friend & coworker Margaret Bright Lucas who died Feb. 4. 1890-And Mrs. Lucas was the Sister of Mrs. Priscilla Bright McLaren and the sister of John Bright and Jacob Bright who was our champion on the floor of the British Parliament. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, NY. Jan. 1. 1903.

In addition to being President of the British women's Temperance association from 1878 until her death, Margaret Lucas (1818-1890) was the first president of the World's Women's Temperance Union. Her travels in America in 1870 stirred her interest in temperance and suffrage reforms and she returned again in 1886 for the WCTU Minneapolis Convention.

The memoir contains a biographical sketch, excerpts of Lucas's annual addresses, and memorial messages from many temperance groups.

 


American Temperance Union
Permanent temperance documents. New York: American Temperance Union, 1851. Three volumes: Vol. 1, 568 p. Fourth Report, 1831-Ninth Report, 1836. Vol. 2, Reports of the American Temperance Union, 1837-l844. Vol. 3, Reports of the American Temperance Union, 1845-1852.
HV5287 .A57 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17024015

Volume 1 is inscribed: Susan B. Anthony had these volumes for her Temperance work in 1853 and they have been studied very much. I place them in the Congressional Library to show the girls of the coming generations that it was not facts that were needed to uproot the Liquor traffic - but the real desire to do it-it is a thing of Law -and nothing but the law can touch it-hence, before women can be a power to annul it-they must have the ballot -and then with earnest men-they may make a balance of power that can unhorse the demon-not until then---so thinks, yours respectfully Susan B. Anthony Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Volume 2 is inscribed: These three volumes are presented to the Congressional Library that the present & future student may see that all that has been needed since the rise of the Temperance movement-1826-has been the power of the ballot in the hands of women -who with men good & true would combine politically to make a grand majority-the world and women wait!! Susan B. Anthony Dec. 25.1902

Volume 3 is inscribed: These books have been studied &c it is hoped will be by future generations. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st. Rochester, N.Y. Dec 25 1902

 


National Temperance Society
Proceedings of the Ninth National Temperance Convention, held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., June 21 and 22, 1881. National Temperance Society and Publication House: New York, 1881. 238 p.
HV5288 .N3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82090557

Convention participants included 367 delegates representing ten national bodies and one hundred and seven state organizations from twenty-five states. A number of women participated and addressed the convention, including Francis Willard on women's activities, Julia Coleman on distribution of temperance literature, and Ellen Foster advocating a constitutional amendment.

 


Curtis, George William.
Speeches of George William Curtis and Henry Ward Beecher. New York: The National-American Woman Suffrage Association, 1898. 90 p.
JF851 .C7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14005853

Reprints Curtis' speeches, Equal rights for women, 1867, and Fair play for women, 1870; and Beecher's speech, Woman's duty to vote, 1866.

Inscribed: George Wm. Curtis-a match almost for Wendell Phillips-in exterior-I used to say-Curtis with a Manuscript and Phillips without a Manuscript-were without their peer in oration-W Phillips & Curtis go together.

Henry Ward Beecher-he was always ready with his powerful eloquence to speak for the Slave and for woman's freedom & franchise. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Phillips, Wendell.
Speeches on Rights of Women. New York: The Nathonal-American Woman Suffrage Association, 1898. 65 p.
JF851 .P7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Reprints Phillips' speeches: Woman's Rights, 1851; Suffrage for Woman, 1861; and Woman's Rights and Woman's Duties, 1866

Inscribed: The beautiful face-the [mutilated] figure-the matchless orator-the true friend-was the author of these-Wendell Phillips-the like of him we shall ne'er see again. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Jan.1. 1903

 


National Woman Suffrage Association.
Report of the Sixteenth Annual Washington Convention, March 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1884: with reports of the Forty-eighth Congress/ edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Rochester, N. Y.: Charles Mann, 1884. 151, 70 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

On spine: Proceedings Woman Suffrage Association 1884, 1893-1901.

Inscribed on fly leaf: Anna H. Shaw Moylan, Pa.

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony S.4.1

No. 1 of 23 pamphlets.

Includes reports on progress toward woman suffrage in individual states and territories, speeches by May Wright Sewall, Abigail Scott Duniway, and Susan B. Anthony, list of officers, and reports of congressional consideration of the suffrage amendment. President Stanton was absent due to the illness of her sister.

 


National Woman Suffrage Association.
Financial Report. 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888. Jane H. Spofford , Treasurer. Washington, D. C.?, 1888.
JK1881 .N28 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Twenty-fifth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, held in Washington, D.C., January 16, 17, 18, 19, 1893 / edited by Harriet Taylor Upton. Washington, D.C.: The Association, 1893. 166 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838401

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, held in Washington, D.C., February 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, 1894 / edited by Harriet Taylor Upton. Washington, D.C., 1894. 236 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Twenty-Seventh Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association held in Atlanta, GA., January 31st to February 5th, 1895 / edited by Harriet Taylor Upton. Warren, Ohio: Ritezel & Co., Printers, 1895. 116 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Twenty-eighth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, held in Washington, D.C., January 23d to 28th, 1896 / edited by Rachel Foster Avery. Philadelphia: The Association (Press of Alfred J. Ferris), 1896. 202 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Twenty-ninth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, at the Central Christian Church . . . Des Moines, Iowa, January 26th, 27th, 28th, and 29th, 1897 / edited by Rachel Foster Avery. Philadelphia: The Association (Press of Alfred J. Ferris), 1897. 126 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838405

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Thirtieth Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association . . . held in Washington, D. C., February 13-19, 1898 / edited by Rachael Foster Avery. Philadelphia: The Association (Press of Alfred J. Ferris), 1898. 168 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Thirty-first Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, at the St. Cecilia Club House, Grand Rapids, Mich., April 27, 28, 29, 30, and May 1, 2, 3, 1899 / edited by Rachel Foster Avery. [New York City]: The Association (Warren, Ohio: Press of Perry), 1899. 160 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838227

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Proceedings of the Thirty-second Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, Washington, D. C., February eighth to fourteenth, 1900 / edited by Rachel Foster Avery. [New York City]: The Association (Philadelphia, Press of Alfred J. Ferris), 1900. 120 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National American Woman Suffrage Assocation.
Proceedings of the Thirty-third Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, held at First Baptist Church ... Minneapolis, Minn., May 30 and 31, June 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, 1901 / edited by Alice Stone Blackwell. [New York City.] : The Association (Warren, Ohio, Press of Frank Perry), 1901. 131 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838229

 


Hooker, Isabella Beecher.
The Constitutional Rights of the Women of the United States. An Address before the International Council of Women, Washington, D. C., March 30, 1888. [Hartford, Conn.] : Hartford Press, Case, Lockwood & Brainard, 1900. 37 p.
JK1881.N28 no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Isabella Hooker contends that the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution support the right of women, as people and citizens, to vote in state and national elections. Also includes a discussion by John Hooker critical of Judge Hunt's decision to dismiss the jury in the Susan B. Anthony trial for voting.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Wyoming: the first free state for woman: July 4, 1890 / by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. n. p., 1890. 4 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95121895

 


Buchanan, Joseph Rodes.
Cosmic sphere of woman / by Jos. Rodes Buchanan. Reprinted from The Arena, 666-681, 189?. 16 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95121906

 


Montgomery, Helen Barrett.
Equal. n. p., 1894. 4 p. Reprinted from Harper's Bazar, 1894..
JK1881 .N28 no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95122104

 


Hughes, James L.
Equal suffrage. Toronto: William Briggs, 1895. 53 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/26010609

Annotated in margins by Anthony's blue pencil lines throughout.

Toronto educator James Laughlin Hughes (1846-1935) was President of the Toronto Woman's Enfranchisement Association.

 


Cravens, Mary J.
Glimpse of the history of woman suffrage / by Mary J. Cravens. Toledo, O.: Toledo Commercial Book and Job Printing, 1887?. 11 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95122112

Annotated in margins by Anthony's blue pencil lines throughout.

 


Stearns, Sarah B.
To the dear women opposed to woman suffrage: an open letter. New York: National-American Woman Suffrage Association, 1895. 4 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123084

Sarah Burger Stearns (1836-1904) helped organize the Minnesota Woman Suffrage Association in 1881 and served as the first president.

 


Channing, William Henry.
History of woman suffrage / review by William Henry Channing. New York: Fowler & Wells, 1881. 24 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123118

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Ecclesiastical vs. civil authority: God in the Federal Constitution, man and woman out : a discourse / by Parker Pillsbury. Concord, N.H.: Republican Press Association, 1894. 25 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123191

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Suffrage, a natural right / by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Chicago: Open Court Pub. Co., 1894. 10 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123220

 


Petition for equal suffrage to the Constitutional Convention of the state of New York to meet in Albany, May, 1894. New York? : s.n., 1894. 1 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95141731

 


Anthony, Susan B.
Status of woman, past, present, and future / by Susan B. Anthony. Reprinted from the Arena, May 1897, 901-908. The Arena, 1897. 8 p.
JK1881 .N28 no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123251

Anthony reviews the progress in women's rights over the last fifty years, especially improvements in access to education and the professions. She contends that sustained progress and humanity uplift will only be assured by suffrage equality.

 


New York State Woman Suffrage Association.
1894 Constitutional amendment campaign year. Report of the New York State Woman Suffrage Association. Twenty-sixth Annual Convention, Ithaca, N.Y., November 12-15. Rochester, N.Y: Charles Mann, Printers, 1895. 242 p.
JK1883 .N5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: Gift of Mrs. May Wright Sewall by Mrs. Ida Husted Harper, Literary Executor. 1923.

Inscribed: Mrs. May Wright Sewall & her best love Theodore L. Sewall From their loving friend Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Oct. 15/95

 


Report of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th & 20th, 1848. Rochester : Printed by J. Dick, 1848. 9 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123305

On spine: Reports of Woman's Rights Conventions, 1848 - 1870.

Typescript Contents lists 17 items.
Anthony notes before 10th item: There were no reports of Philadelphia 1854, Cincinnati, 1855, New York, 1856 and 1858, [no] convention in 1859.
Anthony notes before 12th item: Then the Hiatus of the war and the Woman's Loyal League, New York.

No. 1 of 17 pamphlets.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Unitarian Church, Rochester, N.Y., August 2, 1848 : to consider the rights of woman, politically, religiously and industrially / revised by Amy Post. New York: R.J. Johnston, printer, 1870. 16 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123339

 


Address of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, delivered at Senaca Falls & Rochester, N.Y. July 19th & August 2d, 1848. New York: Robert J. Johnston, 1870. 19 p.
JK1885 1848a no.3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123354

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 23d & 24th, 1850. Boston : Prentiss & Sawyer, 1851. 84 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838286

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 15th and 16th,1851. New York : Fowlers and Wells, 1852. 112 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838287

On the title page Anthony has inserted “Second National” before “Woman's.”.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Syracuse, September 8th, 9th, & 10th, 1852. Syracuse : Printed by J.E. Masters, 1852. 98 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123503

Inscribed on a paste down at the top of the title page: Mrs. Paulina W. Davis with the respects of Samuel J. May.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention held at the Broadway Tabernacle, in the city of New York, on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 6th and 7th, 1853. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1853. 96 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838289

A news clipping announcing the 1853 convention pasted on the title page verso is labeled in Anthony's hand: Call for the Womans Rights Con. Sept. 6.7.1853. Below the clipping Anthony continues: The report of the “world's” & the “whole worlds” Temperance Conventions ought to come here, but I do not find one in existence. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Susan B. Anthony helped organize and was elected a secretary at the Whole World's Temperance Convention that met in New York City on September 1 and 2, 1853, after women delegates were refused seating at the May convention.

Lucretia Mott presided at the Woman's Rights Convention. Susan B. Anthony spoke, pointing out that although four fifths of New York teachers were women, they received only one third of budgeted funds. Proceedings were interrupted both days by Mr. Elliott, asking for reasons why women should vote.

 


Proceedings of the National Woman's Rights Convention held at Cleveland, Ohio, on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, October 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1853. Cleveland: Gray, Beardsley, Spear, & Co., 1854. 188 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838288

Inside back paper cover, inscribed by Susan B. Anthony: On account of economy, there were no reports of the Convention in Philadelphia, Pa. 1854; Cincinatti, Ohio 1855; New York, 1856. Then there was no Convention on account-well all the women had, or were about to have children & Mrs. Rose was ill, 1857; no report for 1858

Harriot Stanton Blatch and Anne Fitzhugh Miller were both born in 1856.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address to the Legislature of New York, adopted by the state woman's rights convention, held St Albany, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 14 and 15, 1854. Prepared by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1854. 20 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Proceedings of the Ninth National Woman's Rights Contention held in New York City, Thursday May 12, 1859, with a photographic report of the Speech of Wendell Phillips, by J.M.W. Yerrinton. Rochester: A. Strong & Co., 1859. 20 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Proceedings of the tenth National Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Cooper Institute, New York City, May 10th and 11th, 1860 : phonographic report by J.M.W. Yerrinton. Boston: Printed by Yerrinton & Garrison, 1860. 100 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123514

Title page inscribed: Julia A. Wilbur

 


Women's National League.
Prayer of one hundred thousand: speech of Hon. Chas. Sumner on the presentation of the first installment of the emancipation petition of the Women's National League. New York : Women's Loyal National League, 1864. 4 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123535

Inscribed on the verso of a single sheet entitled Women's Rights Tracts and Documents to be obtained of Susan B. Anthony, facing Sumner's speech:

No Annual Conventions in 1861-62. 63. 64. 65 were abandoned on account of the war-a very poor reason. But we had The Woman's Loyal League in New York and rolled up a petition to Congress of 365, 000 names for the black men & women-thinking when slavery was out of the way men would be able to see the great wrong to the women of the nation-they would see the degradation of disfranchisement. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

At the foot of p. 4 is a note in Anthony's hand: Here ought to come the pamphlet report of the Women's Loyal League-but I cant find a single copy. This acknowledges the receipt of the [first one hundred thousand] petitions-265,000 followed.

Susan B. Anthony was the secretary of the Women's Loyal League that collected petitions calling for the emancipation of all slaves in the United States.

 


Proceedings of the meeting of the Loyal Women of the Republic, held in New York, May 14, 1863. New York: Phair & Co., printers, 1863. iv, 86 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123557

Inscribed: Mrs. Mary H. White was one of the representatives from Connecticut.

Preceded by an address of Elizabeth Cady Stanton to the women of the republic, March 30, 1863, reprinted from the N.Y. Tribune.

 


Proceedings of the eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 10, 1866: phonographic report by H. M. Parkhurst. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1866. 80 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes list of officers and publications

 


Proceedings of the first anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association, held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 9 and 10, 1867: phonographic report by H. M. Parkhurst. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1867. 80 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Susan B. Anthony was a founding organizer and served as corresponding secretary to the American Equal Rights Association.

 


Mill, John Stuart.
Speech of John Stuart Mill, M.P., on the admission of women to the electoral franchise. Spoken in the House of Commons, May 20th, 1867. London? : Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1867?. 17 p.
JK1885 1848a no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123573

 


Davis, Paulina Wright., comp.
History of the national woman's rights movement, for twenty years, with the proceedings of the decade meeting held at Apollo Hall, October 20, 1870, from 1850 to 1870, with an appendix containing the history of the movement during the winter of 1871 in the national capitol. New York: Journeymen printers' co-operative association, 1871. 94 p. Incomplete.
JK1885 1848a no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/20022202

Paper cover inscribed by Anthony: Perfect; Don't Destroy

Inserted loose: Joker playing card“"Victor A. Mauger”

 


Woman's Rights Convention, held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th & 20th, 1848. Rochester : Printed by J. Dick, 1848. 9 p.; 23 cm.
JK1885 1848c no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123305

Spine label: Reports of Woman's Rights Conventions, 1848 - 1870.

Cover Label: S. B. Anthony

Fly leaf: Anna H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa.

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, O. 4. 22

Typescript Contents lists thirteen items.

No. 1 of 13 pamphlets.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Unitarian Church, Rochester, N.Y., August 2, 1848 : to consider the rights of woman, politically, religiously and industrially / revised by Amy Post. New York: R.J. Johnston, printer, 1870. 16 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123339

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, delivered at Seneca Falls & Rochester, N.Y. July 19th & August 2d, 1848. New York: Robert J. Johnston, 1870. 19 p.
JK1885 1848c no.3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123354

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 23d & 24th, 1850. Boston : Prentiss & Sawyer, 1851. 84 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838286

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Syracuse, September 8th, 9th, & 10th, 1852. Syracuse : Printed by J.E. Masters, 1852. 98 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123503

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention held at the Broadway Tabernacle, in the city of New York, on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 6th and 7th, 1853. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1853. 96 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 6 & 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838289

 


Proceedings of the National Woman's Rights Convention held at Cleveland, Ohio, on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, October 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1853. Cleveland: Gray, Beardsley, Spear, & Co., 1854. 188 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838288

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address to the Legislature of New York, adopted by the state woman's rights convention, held St Albany, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 14 and 15, 1854. Prepared by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1854. 20 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Pasted on verso of title page: news clipping “Woman's Rights State Convention” annotated by Anthony: The Rochester [clipped] N. Convention Nov. 30 & Dec. 1, 1853.

 


Proceedings of the tenth National Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Cooper Institute, New York City, May 10th and 11th,1860 : phonographic report by J.M.W. Yerrinton. Boston: Printed by Yerrinton & Garrison, 1860. 100 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123514

 


Proceedings of the first anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association, held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 9 and 10, 1867: phonographic report by H. M. Parkhurst. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1867. 80 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Susan B. Anthony was a founding organizer and served as corresponding secretary to the American Equal Rights Association.

 


Davis, Pauline, comp.
History of the national woman's rights movement, for twenty years, with the proceedings of the decade meeting held at Apollo Hall, October 20, 1870, from 1850 to 1870. New York: Journeymen printers' co-operative association, 1871. 90 p.
JK1885 1848c no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/20022202

 


Appeal to the women of the United States by the National woman suffrage and educational committee, Washington, D.C. . . . Hartford, Case, Lockwood & Brainard, printers, 1871. 2 p. (incomplete).
JK1885 1848c no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Presents Declaration and Pledge that asserts that as citizens, women are guaranteed suffrage by the Constitution and the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments.

 


Report of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th & 20th, 1848. Rochester : Printed by J. Dick, 1848. 12 p.; 16 cm.
JK1885 1848d no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139324

Spine label: Reports of Woman's Rights Conventions, 1848-1870.

Stamped: S. B. Anthony, 18 Jan 04

Inscribed by Anthony on the front flyleaf of a third compilation of Reports of Woman's Rights Conventions, 1848-1870: The Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. Nearly all the reports, National and state from 1848-the tiny little pamphlet report of the first woman's rights convention ever held in the world-pasted on to the title page of a printed copy of it-I have kept until this-to 1870. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 3. 1904

Anthony's typescript Table of Contents, 3 p., includes several interesting comments.

No. 1 of 23 pamphlets.

Inscribed in pencil: Martha Wright. Read & Circulate

Inscribed: This was given me by Martha C. Wright-Auburn, N.Y.-who with Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Ann McClintock & Jane Hunt called this Convention-though they did not put their names to it. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

This rare first edition of the 1848 Seneca Falls convention report is pasted on the title page of the reprint listed below.

 


Report of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th & 20th, 1848. Rochester : Printed by J. Dick, 1848. 9 p.; 23 cm.
JK1885 1848d no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123305

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Unitarian Church, Rochester, N.Y., August 2, 1848 : to consider the rights of woman, politically, religiously and industrially / revised by Amy Post. New York: R.J. Johnston, printer, 1870. 16 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123339

 


Address of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, delivered at Senaca Falls & Rochester, N.Y. July 19th & August 2d, 1848. New York: Robert J. Johnston, 1870. 19 p.
JK1885 1848d no.4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123354

Inscribed by Anthony: [Partially cropped] and Rochester-also at the [?] Friend Meeting House-and then the manuscript was loaned to [Emma R. Coe?]-and how many times it served her & well. I rescued the faded & warn out paper, had it copied & printed in this pamphlet in 1870.

 


Proceedings of the Ohio Women's Convention, held at Salem, April 19th and 20th, 1850: with an address by J. Elizabeth Jones. Cleveland : Smead & Cowles, 1850. 48 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95139330

Inscribed by Anthony: This was given to Susan B. Anthony in Sept. 1883 by Elizabeth Pease Nichol of Edinburgh, Scotland. Jan. 1. 1903.

From Anthony's typescript index: Third convention, Salem, Ohio. Betsey M. Cowles, President. Speeches by J. Elizabeth Jones, Emily Robinson and others.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 23d & 24th, 1850. Boston: Prentiss & Sawyer, 1851. 84 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838286

From Anthony's typescript index: Fourth Convention, assuming a more National Character, held at Worcester, Mass. Paulina Wright Davis, President.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at, Ohio, May 28 and 29, 1851. Cincinnati: B. Franklin Book and Job Office, 1851. 52 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838317

Inscribed: This was sent me by Mrs. Mary Martin, Fitchville, Ohio. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

From Anthony's typescript index: State Convention, Akron, Ohio, Francis Dane Gage, President.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 15th and 16th, 1851. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1852. 112 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838287

Inscribed: Miss Elizabeth Pease from Miss Hunt of Boston

Inscribed by Anthony: This was sent to Miss Elizabeth Pease (Nichol) Edinburgh, Scotland by Dr. Harriet H. Hunt, the first Woman Doctor of Boston Mass.-and Mrs. Nichol gave it to Susan B. Anthony, when she visited her in 1883. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

From Anthony's typescript index: Second National Convention, Worcester, Mass. Paulina Wright Davis, President.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention held at West Chester, Pa. June 2d and 3d, 1852. Philadelphia: Merrihew and Thompson, 1852. 38 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

From Anthony's typescript index: State Convention, West Chester, Pa. May Anne W. Johnson, President.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Syracuse, September 8th, 9th, & 10th, 1852. Syracuse : Printed by J.E. Masters, 1852. 98 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123503

Inscribed: Mrs. M. E. J. Gage, Manlius

Inscribed by Anthony: She afterwards liked wrote her name Mrs. Matilda Joslyn Gage, Fayettteville, Onondaga Co. N.York. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention held at the Broadway Tabernacle, in the city of New York, on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 6th and 7th, 1853. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1853. 96 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838289

Inscribed: This was a special meeting called during the meetings of the World's Temperance Convention, The Whole world's Tem. Con. And the American Anti slavery societys-It was the only W. R. Con.-so far as I know-that ever had a Mob. Lucy Stone always said throw the Report away-but I believed in saving it. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Proceedings of the National Woman's Rights Convention held at Cleveland, Ohio, on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, October 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1853. Cleveland: Gray, Beardsley, Spear, & Co., 1854. 188 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838288

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, New York, Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Address to the Legislature of New York, adopted by the state woman's rights convention, held at Albany, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 14 and 15, 1854. Prepared by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Albany: Weed, Parsons and Company, 1854. 20 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This speech was not only laid on the table of every Member of the Legislature-but delivered in the Convention---and before a legislative committee-and I had printed 20,000 copies and scattered them throughout the state in my campaign of 1854-1855. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Between no. 13 and no. 14: On a single sheet is the following note in Anthony's hand: A Convention was held at Saratoga Springs in August 1854. No one came to speak-but Mrs. Gage was stopping at a hotel and Miss Sarah Pellet happened there-so I went through with the Convention-with dear Judge Wm. Hay to sustain me. We had a crowded house both morning & evening. Then in 1855 we had another Convention at Saratoga Springs and we had all the speakers there. Mr. Higginson, Charles [Hovey?], Samuel J. May & all. These scrips are all there is to tell of them-also of the Philadelphia convention. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Newspaper clippings, pasted on five sheets, are labeled by Anthony: The First Albany W. R. Convention held at Albany N.Y. Feb. 14 & 15, 1854 in Association Hall; Philadelphia Con. 1854; Saratoga Convention, July 1855.

On the verso of the last clipping sheet is the following note in Anthony's hand:
1854-National Woman's Rights Convention was held in Philadelphia in the autumn. No report was printed of it because of Economy or the [?] of the [?]
1855-the National Con. Was held at Cincinnatti, Ohio & no report. S. B. A. did not attend this one.
1856-The National Con. Was held in New York City-no report.
1857-No convention was held-there were no speakers free to go!
1858-The National was held in New York City. This one was changed to the time of the May Anniversaries-before this they have been in the Fall.
1861-No Convention-all were [?] with the war
1862-No Convention-all were [?] with the war
1863-Women's Loyal League
1864-Women's Loyal League-no report
1865-no Convention
1869-National Convention in New York City and the First National Convention in Washington in January
1870 National Convention in New York City-no report.

 


Report of the select committee of the Ohio Senate, on giving the rights of suffrage to females. Columbus?, 1858?. 10 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed by Anthony: Defeated in Senate by vote 44 to 44. The petition for this bill reached 10,000. 1857 & 58.

 


Proceedings of the Ninth National Woman's Rights Convention held in New York City, Thursday May 12, 1859, with a photographic report of the Speech of Wendell Phillips, by J.M.W. Yerrinton. Rochester: A. Strong & Co., 1859. 20 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838290

Inscribed: This was given me by my dear friend Susan E. Wattles of Mound City, Kansas who was very active with Mrs. C. I. H. Nichols of Wyandotte--that year of the constitutional Convention. Mr. Phillips, Lucy Stone & I helped them to money from the Jackson fund. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y.

Susan E. Wattles December 30, 1881 letter to Anthony describing woman's rights work in Kansas after 1858 is reprinted in History of Woman Suffrage, 2:255-56.

 


Report of the Woman's rights meeting, at Mercantile hall, May 27, 1859. Boston, S. Urbino, 1859. 16 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/06044547

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Proceedings of the Tenth National Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Cooper Institute, New York City, May 10th and 11th, 1860. 1860. 100 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan 1. 1903.

From Anthony's typescript index: Martha C. Wright, President. Discussion on the Rights of Divorce.

Insert of three leaves of clippings: Woman's Rights. Report of the General Agent for Ohio to the Eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention.

Inscribed by Anthony: The convention not held-because of the war-but this report of Mrs. Jones of work done in Ohio is too good to be lost. It was to have been held in New York. May.1861.
At the end of the report, identifying the author as J. Elizabeth Jones, Anthony has added: Salem, Ohio.

From Anthon's typescript index: No convention this year, though Mrs. Jones had hers written for Ohio, and it has been saved from the wreck.

 


Proceedings of the meeting of the Loyal Women of the Republic, held in New York, May 14, 1863. New York : Phair & Co., printers, 1863. 86 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123557

Bound before by Address of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton to the Women of the Republic. (From the New York Tribune) March 30, 1863, iv p., calling on women of the north to support freedom and the war to preserve it.

From Anthony's typescript index: Lucy Stone President. Worked for two years, rolled up a petition to Congress of 365,000. The first installment with speech of Hon. Charles Sumner.

 


Prayer of one hundred thousand : speech of Hon. Chas. Sumner on the presentation of the first installment of the emancipation petition of the Women's National League. New York : Women's Loyal National League, 1864. 4 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123535

 


Proceedings of the eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 10, 1866: phonographic report by H. M. Parkhurst. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1866. 77 p., [2] p.
JK1885 1848d no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan 3.1903. There was a Convention held in Albany, N.Y. in the winter 1866, but nothing has been preserved of it. S. B. A.

 


Proceedings of the first anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association, held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 9 and 10, 1867: phonographic report by H. M. Parkhurst. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1867. 80 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Susan B. Anthony was a founding organizer and served as corresponding secretary to the American Equal Rights Association.

From Anthony's typescript index: Equal Rights Convention, Robert Purvis President. Change of name, was to include all men and women. No report of 1868 and 1869. The conventions were held in Cooper Institute. The reports will be found in the Revolution of those years.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Free Speech: by Elizabeth Cady, at the Fourth Annual N.Y. State Anti-Slavery Convention at Association Hall, Albany, N. Y., February 4th and 5th, 1861. n. p., 1861. 4 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This speech was written during Mrs. Stantons stay at our house-The Farm home-she would play the piano & sing her old songs-much to the gratification of my mother & father in Jan. 1861. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Davis, Paulina (Wright).
History of the national woman's rights movement, for twenty years, with the proceedings of the decade meeting held at Apollo Hall, October 20, 1870, from 1850 to 1870 . . . compiled by Paulina W. Davis. New York: Journeymen printers' co-operative association, 1871. 83 p.
JK1885 1848d no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Report of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th & 20th, 1848. Rochester : Printed by John Dick, in the North Star Office, 1848. 9 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123305

Spine label: Conventions and Hearings, 1848-1902.

Inscribed on fly leaf: Anna H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa.

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony S.4.19

Typescript Index

No. 1 of 24 pamphlets.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Unitarian Church, Rochester, N.Y., August 2, 1848. Revised by Mrs. Amy Post. New York: Robert J. Johnston, printer, 1870. 16 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Initially several women were concerned that having a woman preside would diminish the honor of the Convention.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. Address of Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton: delivered at Seneca Falls & Rochester, N.Y., July 19th & August 2d, 1848. New York: Robert. J. Johnston, printer, 1870. 19 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95123354

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. Address to the Legislature of New-York, adopted by the State Woman's Rights Convention, held at Albany, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 14 and 15, 1854. Albany, Weed, Parsons, 1854. 20 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/55045184

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention, held at Worcester, October 23d & 24th, 1850. Boston: Prentiss & Sawyer, 1851. 84 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Paulina W. Davis, president. Speeches by Davis, Abby Price and Harriet K. Hunt. Includes a list of members of the convention.

 


Proceedings of the Woman's Rights Convention held at the Broadway Tabernacle, in the City of New York on Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 6th and 7th, 1853. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1853. 96 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Proceedings of the Tenth National Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Cooper Institute, New York City, May 10th and 11th, 1860. Boston: Yerrinton & Garrison, 1860. 100 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Proceedings of the Eleventh National Woman's Rights Convention, held at the Church of the Puritans, New York, May 10, 1866. New York, Robert J. Johnston, 1866. 80 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


National Woman Suffrage Association. Report of the Sixteenth Annual Washington Convention, March 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th, 1884: with reports of the Forty-eighth Congress/ edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Rochester, N. Y.: Charles Mann, 1884. 151, 70 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Palmer, Thomas W.
Universal Suffrage. Speech of Hon. Thomas W. Palmer of Michigan in the Senate of the United States, Friday, February 6, 1885. Washington, D. C.: Government Printing Office, 1885. 8 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Woman Suffrage. Views of the Minority. Washington, D. C.: G.P.O., 1886. 3 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Critical of the silence of the majority of the Committee on the Judiciary that reported adversely, E.B. Taylor, W. P. Hepburn, L. B Caswell, and A. A. Ranney recommend adoption of the woman suffrage resolution.

 


Senate Report 1576. Washington, D. C.: G.P.O., 1890. 4 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Henry Blair reported favorably for the majority, recommending adoption of the woman suffrage Jt. Resolution.

 


Hearings before the Senate Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, January 20, 1892. Washington D. C.: G.P.O., 1892. 16 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes remarks of several of the 26 state woman suffrage leaders present, including Carrie Lane Chapman (Washington), Clara Bewick Colby (Nebraska), and Caroline McCullough Everhard (Ohio).

 


Hearings before the House Committee on the Judiciary, January 18, 1892. Washington D. C.: G.P.O., 1892. 14 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes addresses by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony and Isabella Beecher Hooker.

 


Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, February 21, 1894. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1894. 23 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136292

Includes remarks before the Senate committee by Rev. Ida Hulton, Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna L. Diggs, Representative John Davis of Kansas and Rev. Anna Shaw.

 


Report of Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, January 28, 1896. Washington, D. C.: G.P.O., 1896. 23 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes remarks of Mrs. V. Conkling Whitney of Missouri, Helen Morris Lewis of North Carolina, and Lillie Devereux Blake of New York.

 


Report of Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, February 15, 1898. Washington, D. C.: G.P.O., 1898. 24 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes remarks by William Lloyd Garrison, May Wright Sewall, Anna Garlin Spencer, Laura Clay, Harriot Stanton Blatch. Florence Kelley, Mariana W. Chapman, Elizabeth Burrill Curtis, Henry B. Blackwell, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

 


Hearing on House Joint Resolution 68 before the Committee on the Judiciary, February 15, 1898. Washington, D. C.: G. P. O., 1898. 20 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes remarks on school and limited suffrage by Ellen H. Price and remarks on suffrage in Kansas, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Idaho.

 


Hearing before the United States Senate Committee on Woman Suffrage held in the Marble Room of the United State Senate on the 13th day of February 1900, at 10 O'Clock A. M. Washington, D. C.: G.P.O., 1900. 45 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Anthony noted that she has been speaking at Congressional hearing for 32 years and the focus of remarks will be the history of the woman suffrage movement. Clara B. Colby reviewed work with Congress from 1860 onward. Rachael Foster Avery read a paper compiled by former Salina, Kansas, mayor Laura M. Jones on Municipal woman suffrage in Kansas, with statistics. Mary C. Bradford reviewed experience with full woman suffrage in Colorado. Harriot Stanton Blatch spoke on women in English politics. Jessie Cassidy Saunders spoke on woman suffrage in foreign countries. Carrie Chapman Catt and Susan B. Anthony reviewed recent suffrage activities. Mrs. Dodge, representing the Associations opposed to the extension of suffrage to women, stated that the amendment was unnecessary because suffrage is a state right. Emily Bissell stated that she represented the silent majority of millions of women who do not want or need the ballot, noting that women's access to education and expanded property rights have occurred without suffrage. She contended that nothing important had happened in states that have woman suffrage.

 


Woman suffrage hearing before the Committee on Judiciary of the House of Representatives, Tuesday, February 13, 1900. Washington, D. C.: G. P. O., 1900. 35 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Lillie Devereux Blake, Elizabeth Sheldon Tillinghast presented the Constitutional and economic arguments for woman suffrage. Anti-suffragists were represented by Thomas Russell and Mrs. A. J. George of Boston, who offered a tabulation of 160 separate defeats of woman suffrage measures in 34 states during the previous 50 years.

 


Woman Suffrage Hearing before the Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, United States Senate. February 18, 1902. Washington: G. P. O., 1902. 39 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes remarks by Harriet May Mills, Lucretia Blankenburg, Olympia Brown, Mary Wood Swift, Lucy Hobart Day, Alice Stone Blackwell, Vida Goldstein of Australia, and Anna Shaw.

 


Woman Suffrage Hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives. February 18, 1902. Washington: G. P. O., 1902. 23 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Carrie Chapman Catt noted that an International Woman Suffrage Conference was being held in Washington. Delegates from some of the eight participating nations spoke about suffrage in other countries including Vida Goldstein of Australia, Sofja Levovna Friedland of Russia, Emmy Evald of Sweden and Florence Fenwick Miller. Isabel Campbell described good results from woman suffrage in Wyoming and Ida M. Weaver outlined successes in Idaho.

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Congressional Reports in Favor of an amendment to the National Constitution prohibiting the disfranchisement of United States Citizens on account of Sex. New York, 1899?. 12 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Summarizes arguments of the eleven favorable Congressional reports, five from the Senate, six from House Committees, since delegates from the National Woman Suffrage Association first requested the woman suffrage Constitutional amendment in 1869.

Anthony distributes copies of this pamphlet at the 1900 Senate hearings.

 


Anthony, Susan B. and Ida Husted Harper.
Introduction to Volume IV of The History of Woman Suffrage, 1883-1900. Rochester, N. Y.: Charles Mann Printing Company, 1904. 24 p.
JK1888 1848 no. 24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Sumner, Charles.
The Prayer of One Hundred Thousand: Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner on the Presentation of the First Installment of the Emancipation Petition of the Women's National League with printed letter from Susan B. Anthony calling for others to sign the petition. New York: Women's Loyal National League, 1864. 4 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 1 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Front flyleaf inscription: To Rev. Anna Howard Shaw, Philadelphia, Penn, From her friend & coworker Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., April 14, 1904.

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, S.4.19

Contents of this volume, typescript, 4p. One entry added in hand of Susan B. Anthony.

No. 1 of 37 pamphlets.

 


Memorial of Victoria C. Woodhull with Report of Committee on the Judiciary and Views of the Minority. United States House of Representatives, 1871. 16 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95140663

 


Woodhull, Victoria.
Lecture on constitutional equality, delivered at Lincoln Hall, Washington, D.C., Thursday, February 16, 1871 / by Victoria C. Woodhull. New York : Journeymen Printers' Co-operative Assoc., 1871. 28 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136535

Victoria Woodhull argues that the 14th and 15th amendments secured suffrage for women that cannot be denied by the states.

 


Memorial of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Isabella Beecher Hooker, Elizabeth L. Blanden, Olympia Brown, Susan B. Anthony, and Josephine L. Griffing to the Congress of the United States and the Arguments thereon before the Judiciary Committee of the U. S. Senate by Isabella Beecher Hooker, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. Washington: Chronicle Publishing Company, 1872. 30 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

The memorialists request that Congress promptly enact a law to protect women in exercising their constitutional right of suffrage.

 


Mr. Carpenter, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the following report. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1872. 5 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136539

The committee concludes that the fifteenth amendment recognizes the states right to limit suffrage on any account except “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

 


Gage, Matilda Joslyn and Sara J. Spencer.
Arguments before the Committee on the District of Columbia . . .upon the Centennial Woman Suffrage Memorial. Washington, D. C.: Gibson Brothers, 1876. 12 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gage, President of the National Woman Suffrage Association, and Sara Spencer, Secretary of the District of Columbia Woman Franchise Association, call for Congress to grant suffrage to women and men in the District before celebrating the Centennial.

 


Arguments in behalf of a Sixteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, prohibiting the several states from disfranchising united states citizens on account of sex, January 11 and 12, 1878 . . . Washington, D. C. : GPO, 1878. 45 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Twelve delegates of the National Woman Suffrage Association, including current president Dr. Clemence Lozier, speak in support of woman suffrage; Madeline Vinton Dahlgren speaks against it.

 


Majority report of the United States Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections: against a sixteenth amendment to the Constitution prohibiting the several states from disfranchising United States citizens on account of sex . . . June 14. 1878; Minority Report . . .February 1, 1879. Washington : G.P.O., 1879. 9 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136550

The majority of the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections recommends indefinite postponement due to various reasons including lack of support by the majority of women and significant improvements in condition of women without suffrage.

 


Arguments of the woman-suffrage delegates before the Committee on the Judiciary of the United States Senate, January 23, 1880. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1880. 26 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 9 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136569

Anthony highlighted her comments explaining that state legislatures composed of intelligent, thinking men could approve a national suffrage amendment, while constituencies with many ignorant voting men would not support change to state constitutions to allow woman suffrage.

 


Mr. Lapham, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany S. Res. 60. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1882. 6 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 10 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136678

E. G. Lapham, T.M. Ferry, and H. W. Blair recommend that the Senate pass the resolution and submit the proposed amendment to the states.

 


Mr. George, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following views of the minority, to accompany joint resolution S.R. 60. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1882. 3 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 11 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136699

J. Z. George, Howell E. Jackson, and James G. Fair recommend rescinding the resolution and leaving the states to decide on woman suffrage.

 


Woman suffrage: Mr. White, from the Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany H. Res. 255. Washington, D.C. : G.P.O., 1883. 2 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 12 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136712

House select committee recommends the suffrage amendment be submitted to the state legislatures.

 


Arguments before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives / by a committee of the sixteenth annual Washington convention of the National Woman-Suffrage Association . . . Washington, D. C., 1884. 15 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 13 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95136751

Anthony notes that this is the sixteenth year that women have appeared before Congress requesting protection for women in their exercise of their right to vote. Since efforts to change four state constitutions have failed, she appeals to Congress to lift the decision from the populace to the state legislatures by approving the national amendment. Anthony is pleased by the number of committee members present at both the House and Senate hearings.

 


Congressional action in the first session of the 48th Congress, 1883, 1884. National Woman Suffrage Association, 1884. 70 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 14 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Reprints reports of House and Senate and includes additional comments by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Gage.

 


In the Senate of the United States, March 28, 1884. Mr. Palmer, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany S.R. 19. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1884. 31 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 15 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95138064

Committee recommends Senate pass resolution and submit suffrage amendment to state legislatures. Includes arguments by delegates from the National Woman Suffrage Association, March 7, 1884.

 


Universal suffrage: speech of Hon. Thomas W. Palmer of Michigan in the Senate of the United States, Friday, February 6, 1885. Washington, 1885. 15 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 16 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Palmer summarizes the progress of the suffrage movement, refutes objections to woman suffrage, notes contributions of women to war and social issues and supports submission of the amendment because the Nation needs the cooperation of women in solving economic and social challenges.

 


In the Senate of the United States, February 2, 1886. Mr. Blair, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany S. Res. 5. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1886. 38 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 17 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95138072

The majority report of Henry Blair, Thomas Palmer, Jonathan Chance, and Thomas Bowen, again as in the two previous Congresses, recommends that the Senate submit the suffrage amendment to the state legislatures.

 


Mr. Brown, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following views of the minority to accompany S. Res. 5. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1886. 10 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 18 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95138215

Joseph Brown and F. M. Cockrell submit excerpts from "Letters from a Chimney Corner" by a Chicago anti-suffragist, and resubmit their report to the 48th Congress, maintaining that suffrage is a states' rights issue.

 


Woman Suffrage. Views of the Minority. House Report No. 2289. n. p., 1886. 3 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 19 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed by Anthony: Reports Hon. Ezra B. Taylor, 1886

Dissenting from the majority of the House Committee on the Judiciary that reported the resolution adversely without comment, the minority, E. B. Taylor, W. P. Hepburn, L. B. Caswell, and A. A. Ranney are in support of adopting the resolution. Women need the vote for their own good and the good of others.

 


Debate on Woman Suffrage in the Senate of the United States, 2d session, 49th Congress, December 8, 1886, and January 25, 1887 by Senators H. W. Blair, J. E. Brown, J. N. Dolph, G. G. Vest, and Geo. F. Hoar. Washington, 1887. 87 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 20 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Senate debate includes recording an extensive list of men that are against woman suffrage, a letter from Clara T Leonard, and a pamphlet "The Law of Woman-Life" by Adeline D. T. Whitney. Results of voting: yeas 16, nays 34, absent 26. Two thirds did not vote for the resolution, so it did not pass.

 


Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, United States Senate, April 2, 1888. Washington, 1888. 21 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 21 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Arguments in support of woman suffrage are presented by delegates to the International Woman's Council, including statements by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Julia Ward Howe, Susan B. Anthony, and Frances Willard, as well as foreign delegates from England, Norway, Finland, and France.

 


Woman suffrage. Hearing before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, on February 11, 1890. Washington, 1890. 12 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 22 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/22012298

Stanton acknowledges support of Congressmen, living and dead, who have supported the cause of woman suffrage for a quarter century. In the margin near the paragraph in which Stanton warns that ignoring women's appeal for justice is causing growing discontent that is dangerous to the State and the family, Anthony has penned "This brought down the house." Stanton urges Congress to pass a bill that would protect women in their right to vote for members of Congress, while awaiting the longer process of ratifying the suffrage amendment. The last paragraph has been clipped.

 


In the Senate of the United States, August 12, 1890, Mr. Blair, from the Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany S. Res. 1. Washington, D.C. : G.P.O., 1890. 4 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 23 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/93838351

For the majority of the committee, Henry Blair reports favorably, recommending passage of the resolution.

 


Woman Suffrage. Washington, 1892. 16 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 24 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Susan Anthony introduces several younger women state delegates to the National Woman Suffrage Association convention at the January 20, 1892 hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, including Alice Stone Blackwell, Clara Bewick Colby, Isabella Beecher Hooker, and Anna H. Shaw. Anthony notes this is the 23rd year of appeals in person and the 27th year by petition for suffrage protection.

 


Hearing of the Woman Suffrage Association before the Committee on the Judiciary, January 18, 1892. Washington, 1892. 8 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 25 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, president of the National Woman Suffrage Association, addressed the House Committee on the Judiciary. Lucy Stone addressed the committee for the first time, stressing the power of the vote and woman's need for the vote in order have her interests heard and honored by legislatures.

 


In the Senate of the United States, January 4, 1893. Mr. Warren, from the Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, submitted the following report to accompany S.R. 129. Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1893. 6 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 26 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95138220

The majority favorably reported and recommended passage, explicitly stating their support of equal suffrage.

 


In the Senate of the United States. Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, February 21, 1894. Washington, D. C.: G. P.O., 1894. 23 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 27 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed by Anthony: Miss Rachel Foster Avery presiding

Alice Stone Blackwell responds to Senator Wolcott's questions regarding changes in women's participation in states where they can vote. Anna Diggs discusses women voting in municipal elections in Kansas. Clara Bewick Colby of Nebraska answers questions about women voting in Wyoming. Hearing concluded with remarks by National Woman Suffrage Association Vice President Anna Shaw.

 


Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, February 21, 1894: the sub-committee of the Committee on the Judiciary met at 10 a.m., Hon. Isaac H. Goodnight in the chair . . . Washington, D.C.: G.P.O., 1894. 14 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 28 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/95142280

Inscribed by Anthony: This is the only copy of the Hearing of the House in 1894-the first at which Rev Anna Howard Shaw Presided-no she made a speech and Miss Anthony Presided.

 


Senate Report of Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage, January 28, 1896. Washington: G. P. O., 1896. 23 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 29 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Hearing of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, January 28, 1896. Washington: G. P. O., 1896. 21 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 30 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Report of Hearing before the Committee on Woman Suffrage. February 15, 1898. Washington: G.P.O., 1898. 24 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 31 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

William Lloyd Garrison and Henry Blackwell speak in support of woman suffrage along with several women addressing women's fitness to vote in relation to their mental, moral, and physical development.

 


House of Representatives. Before the Committee on the Judiciary, February 15, 1898. Hearing on House joint resolution 68 Washington, 1898. 20 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 32 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Includes reports on various subjects related to woman suffrage. Ellen Price discusses school and other limited suffrage and provides a table, chronologically arranged, of limited woman suffrage. Woman suffrage in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and foreign countries are discussed.

 


Hearings before the United States Senate Committee on Woman Suffrage . . . on the 13th day of February, 1900. Washington: G.P.O., 1900. 45 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 33 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Clara B. Colby presents a detailed summary of suffragists' work with Congress during the past thirty years, naming Congressmen who supported the cause and those in opposition. Laura Johns reports on municipal suffrage in Kansas, including women holding offices. Jessie Cassidy Saunders reports on woman suffrage in foreign countries and provides tables that show specific progress. Anthony stresses the need to submit a suffrage amendment to state legislatures, noting that acquiring suffrage by popular vote is impossible, mostly due to the negative immigrant vote.

Mrs. Arthur M. Dodge speaks for women opposed to woman suffrage, noting that the suffrage is the sovereign right of states. Emily Bissell and Mrs. Joel T. Vail further contend that Anthony is leading a minority movement that is not representative of the majority of women.

 


Woman suffrage. Hearings before the Committee on Judiciary of the House of Representatives, February 13, 1900. Washington: G. P. O., 1900. 35 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 34 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Woman Suffrage. Hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives. February 18, 1902. Washington: G.P.O., 1902. 23 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 35 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Carrie Chapman Catt introduces delegates from the International Woman Suffrage Conference representing Australia, Russia, Sweden, Norway and England. Testimonials follow for success of woman suffrage in Wyoming and Idaho. Then noting that testimonials are not always given authority, Catt asks that the committee request that the House appoint a commission to investigate the results of woman suffrage in operation.

 


Woman Suffrage. Hearing before the Select Committee on Woman Suffrage, United States Senate. Washington: G.P.O., 1902. 39 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 36 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

On February 18, 1902, the Senate committee heard statements from National American Woman Suffrage Association representatives and several foreign suffragists. Susan B. Anthony notes that women have addressed the committee for thirty-three years and the only thing that they have gotten from the committee is printings of the hearings.

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association. Congressional Reports in Favor of an Amendment to the Nation Constitution prohibiting the disfranchisement of United States citizens on account of sex. New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1899. 12 p.
JK1888 1863 no. 37 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Copies of this pamphlet were distributed by Susan B. Anthony at the Senate hearing in 1900. (See JK 1888 1863 no. 33 p. 40) It documents eleven favorable reports, five from Senate committees, six from House committees and reprints excerpts from reports between 1871 and 1893.

 


Davis, Paulina W.
History of the national woman's rights movement, for twenty years, with the proceedings of the decade meeting held at Apollo Hall, October 20, 1870 from 1850 to 1870. New York: Journeymen printers' co-operative association, 1871. 119 p., 5 p., 28 p.
JK1896 .D3 1871b (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/20022202

Gift: Estate of Susan B. Anthony, June 28, 1937

Printed by hand on inside front cover: Anna H. Shaw Moylan. Pa.

Inscribed: This report of Mrs. Paulina Wright Davis of Providence Rhode Island is presented to the Congressional Library Washington, D. C. It was the first attempt at writing a history of the Woman's Rights Movement and very fair in its presentation of the facts and persons. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison St. Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Includes an appendix that documents Victoria Woodhull's memorial to Congress, December 19, 1870; the New Party Platform read by Woodhull at the May 1871 Suffrage Convention and Woodhull's Lecture on Constitutional Equality, February 16, 1871.

 


Coup-d'oeil analytique sur L'histoire du suffrage de la femme auz États-Unis d'Amérique : ouvrage publié à New-York en 1881 / par Mmes Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Mathilde Joslyn Gage. Toulouse: Imp. J. Boe, 1882. 26 p.
JK1896 .S814 1882 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Anthony, Susan B.
An Account of the proceedings on the trial of Susan B. Anthony on the charge of illegal voting at the presidential election in Nov., 1872, and on the trial of Beverly W. Jones, Edwin T. Marsh and William B. Hall, the inspectors of elections by whom her vote was received. Rochester, N.Y.: Daily Democrat and Chronicle Book Print, 1874. vii, 212 p.
JK1899 .A6 A5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This I give to the Congressional Library, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25. 1902

Inscribed: When Mary S. Anthony is done with it-M. S. A

Further Inscribed by SBA: (Speech of S. B. A. Page 81)

Gift of Lucy E. Anthony, O. 21. 19

Tipped in after printed text:

Reprint of a favorable review of the Account from Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, April 23, 1874, 2 p.

Autograph letter of H. R. Selden, Anthony's lawyer, dated January 12, 1874 forwarding the petition he prepared for Anthony, asking Congress to relieve her from Judge Hunt's illegal conviction and fine. Selden considers Hunt's actions a "judicial outrage." 3 p.

Copies of Anthony's petition and Congressional reports denying her request. 4 p., 4p., 8 p.

Text is annotated throughout with Anthony's blue pencil.

Susan B. Anthony was one of fourteen women arrested and indicted in November 1872 for "knowingly voting without having a lawful right to vote." Only Anthony's case was brought to trial in June 1873, where the judge dismissed the jury, found Anthony guilty and fined her $100. In order to preserve a full record of the case and publicize her arguments, Anthony compiled this account, including the indictment, a transcript of the trial, her pretrial lecture delivered in fifty places in two counties, a speech by Matilda Joslyn Gage delivered in sixteen places, and an article by John Hooker on the right of trial by jury.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to her life-long friend and coworker Susan B. Anthony on her eightieth birthday, February 15, 1900. n. p., 1900. 4 p.
JK1899 .A6 S7 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/01020741

Stanton's poem recalls her first meeting with Anthony, their travels in the cause of suffrage and their passing of the reins to a younger generation.

 


Ward, Lydia (Avery) Coonley.
Susan B. Anthony, February 15, 1820 February 15, 1900. Loves rosary. n. p., 1900. 4 p.
JK1899 .A6 W3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk83011976

Lydia Avery Coonley Ward (1845-1924), a poet and philanthropist, often entertained Susan Anthony and other suffrage leaders at her Hillside estate in Wyoming, New York. This poem celebrates Anthony's service to women on her eightieth birthday.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
Eighty years and more (1815-1897). Reminiscences of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. New York: European publishing company, 1898. 474 p. front (port.).
JK1899 .S7 A3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/14015654

Inscribed by Stanton: We cement our friendship of half a century with an exchange of our autobiographies. Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Susan B. Anthony 250 West 94th St. New York May 25 1899.

Printed in pen inside front cover: Anna H. Shaw Moylan Pa.

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate September 5, 1941

 


Constitution of Massachusetts and New-York, and that of the United States . . . Pittsfield: Printed by Phinehas Allen, 1806. 107 p.
JK3125 1780.A575 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11025361

Inscribed: J. Wadsworth or Danl Anthony 3 Mo 15th 1820

Inscribed: Joseph Wadsworth was my fathers-Dan'l Anthony's partner at Tophet Brook factory South Adams Mas. in Scythe-making-but 1820 is the year that I was born-hence this book is 83 years old just one month after I am 83. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Coleridge, John.
The Lord Chief Justice Coleridge on Women's Suffrage. London: Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1885. 1 p.
JN979 .C64 1885 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Fawcett, Henry.
The Late Mr. Fawcett on Women's Suffrage and the Franchise Bill. Manchester: A. Ireland and Co., Printers, 1884. 4 p.
JN979 .F24 1884 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

In his October 13, 1884 speech at Shoeditch, Fawcett supported suffrage for women householders.

 


Iddesleigh, Stafford Henry Northcote, Earl of.
The Late Lord Iddesleigh on Women's Suffrage. London: Women's Printing Society, 1887. 4 p.
JN979 .I33 1887 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

In his 1884 House of Commons speech, Northcote supported suffrage for women taxpapers.

 


Jones, J. V. (John Viriamu).
The enfranchisement of women: a speech delivered at a meeting of the Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, on April 18th, 1893 / by J.V. Jones, (principal of the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire). London: Women's Printing Society, Ltd., 1893. 8 p.
JN979 .J66 1893 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Jones contends that women are fit to make intelligent decisions, so withholding political equality is detrimental to them and society.

 


Kitchin, George W.
The Dean of Winchester on Woman's Suffrage. London: Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1885. 1 p.
JN979 .K58 1885 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Kitchin believes the Gospels support woman suffrage and that voting women would favor peace, temperance, and morality.

 


McIlquham, Mrs.
The Enfranchisement of Women: An ancient right, a modern need/ a paper read by Mrs. McIlquham (Poor Law Guardian) to the Bedminster (Bristol) Champion Habitation of the Primrose League, on the 11th December, 1891. London: Women's Emancipation Union, 1891. 18 p.
JN979 .M42 1891 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Occasional paper/ National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, Central and East of England Society for Women's Suffrage. London: Printed by Vacher & Sons, 1900. 10 p.
JN979 .O44 1900 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Reviews efforts from 1868 to 1900 to extend parliamentary franchise to women.

 


Spencer, Herbert.
Herbert Spencer on Women's Suffrage. London: Central National Society for Women's Suffrage, 1900. 1 p.
JN979 .S68 1900 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Taylor, M.
Why Women want the Suffrage. London: Women's Printing Society, 1885. 2 p.
JN979 .T38 1885 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Twenty-Five Reasons for Supporting Women's Suffrage. London: Women's Printing Society, 1884. 2 p.
JN979 .T84 1884 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Women's Suffrage, Why Should Women Demand the Franchise? London: Central and Western Society for Women's Suffrage, 1885. 1 p.
JN979 .W64 1885 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Reeves, William Pember and J. A. Cockburn.
The working of women's suffrage in New Zealand and South Australia: speeches / by W.P. Reeves, and J.A. Cockburn. London: Published by the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, 1897. 16 p.
JQ5889 .R44 1897 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Reeves, Agent General for New Zealand, reports that none of the negative consequences predicted by the opponents of woman suffrage have occurred in New Zealand where woman suffrage is a success. Cockburn, Agent General for South Australia, notes positive gradual social changes that have occurred since women could vote.

 


Bremner, Christina.
Education of girls and women in Great Britain, by C. S. Bremner, with a preface by Miss E. P. Hughes. London: S. Sonnenschein & co., 1897. xiv, 296 p.
LC2042 .B8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/e 10000082

Note card pasted inside front cover: June 17. '99. Dear Miss Anthony, Many thanks for your most kind letter--I shall prize it among my "archives." Please accept this copy of my little book on education. And do you mind noting that I am not a Mrs. but a Miss? Cordially Yours & looking forward to meeting you, C. S. Bremner.

Inscribed by Bremner: Miss Susan B. Anthony with C. S. Bremner's respect & gratitude for what she has so largely been instrumental in achieving for Anglo-Saxon women: the open door. June 17th. 1899.

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N. Y. Dec. 25. 1902

In her preface Christina Sinclair Bremner explains that at the International Congress of Education in Chicago in 1893, Frances Willard had asked her to compile a report on education of girls and women in Great Britain as part of a proposed series that would survey women's education in all civilized countries.

 


Dedication of Antioch College, and inaugural address of its president, Hon. Horace Mann. Yellow Springs, O.A. S. Dean. Boston: Crosby & Nichols, 1854. 132 p.
LD171 .A549 1854 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This early word for the higher education of women I give for its great merit. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Antioch College of Yellow Springs, Ohio, is a co-educational liberal arts college founded in 1852. Education reformer Horace Mann, who served as the first president until his death in 1859, advocated equal opportunity in higher education for women

 


Memorial. Alfred E. Burr. March 27, 1815-January 8, 1900. Founder of the Hartford Daily Times. Hartford, 1900. 103 p.
PN4874 .B85 M4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16004976

Inscribed: Mr Burr-though a Democrat-always gave the right hand of fellowship to me & the Cause. His sister -Frances Ellen Burr-who sent this-was secretary of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Society-and always a true friend of the movemt-state & national. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1902 (sic) [1903]

 


Hale Sarah Josepha, ed.
Complete dictionary of poetical quotations: comprising the most excellent and appropriate passages in the old British poets; with choice and copious selections from the best modern British and American poets. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & co., 1853. 576 p. Illus..
PN6082 .H2 1853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17011653

Inscribed in pencil: Anthony, 7th mo 12. 1854

Inscribed by Anthony: When this book of quotations was given me by my brother-Daniel R. Anthony-I might have imagined that I could commit some of these beautiful Sentiments to memory-that I might adorn a speech with one-but soon that was proved a fallacy-for I never could learn more than one line of anything. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester. N.Y., Dec. 25. 1902

 


Edgeworth, Richard Lovell and Maria Edgeworth.
Readings on poetry. By Richard Lovell Edgeworth and Maria Edgeworth. Boston: Published by Wells and Lilly. Sold by Van Winkle and Wiley, New-York; and by M. Carey, Philadelphia, 1816. 206 p.
PR503 .E4. (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/31024093

British novelist Maria Edgeworth (1768-1849) collaborated with her father on a number of educational writings, here offering explanations for young people of poems chosen chiefly from "Enfield's Speaker," an established school book.

 


Three centuries of English poetry, being selections from Chaucer to Herrick, with introductions and notes by Rosaline Orme Masson and a general preface by David Masson. London: Macmillan and co., 1876. xxii, 391 p., illus..
PR1175 .M35 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/11034154

Inscribed: To the Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec.25. 1902.

David Masson was Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in the University of Edinburgh. He and his wife Emily Rosaline Orme Masson (1835-1915) were friends of J. S. Mill and supporters of woman suffrage and higher education for women.

 


Bunyan, John.
Pilgrim's progress from this world to that which is to come; delivered under the similitude of a dream. Auburn and Rochester: Alden & Beardsley, 1856. 491 p.
PR3330 .A1 1856 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15028225

Inscribed: G. P. McLean. Rochester. N.Y.

Inscribed: This book was presented to my sister Mrs. Guelma Penn Anthony McLean by her husband in 1858-Aaron Melick McLean. I now give it to the Congressional Library with other books. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st. Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902.

 


Cowper, William.
Task: a poem in six books. Philadelphia: Published by Bennett and Walton, no. 31, Market-street, J. Rakestraw, printer, 1811. 212 p.
PR3382 .T3 1811 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16018669

Inscribed in different hands: Aaron M. McLean; Cowper's Task, D. R. Anthony; Danl Anthony's Cowpers Task.

Inscribed: My father's name Dan'l Anthony, my brothers name D. R. Anthony and brother in law's name Aaron M. McLean--are scratched on the opposite leaves. I know that my father D. Anthony used to read its pages and ask us girls what such & such paragraphs meant-- and that Cowper's Task was used as a text book for 'parsing' in the Nine Partners Boarding School-All this I remember well. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester N.Y., Dec. 25. 1902

Daniel Anthony (1794-1862) had attended the Nine Partners Quaker school in Dutchess County, N.Y.

 


Defoe, Daniel.
Life and surprising adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, mariner: with a biographical account of Defoe. New York: Derby & Jackson, 1859. 469 p.
PR3403 .A1 1859 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16001224

Inscribed: Thos. King McLean, Rochester, 1860

Inscribed: This book belonged to my eldest sister's-Guelma's--only son-who died his graduating year-1870--Thomas King McLean. I give it with all its sad memories-sad because of hopes missed in the buding-to The Congressional Library, Washington. D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester N. Y., Dec.25.1902

 


Bronte, Charlotte.
Jane Eyre. London: Smith, Elder, & co., 1882. 483 p.
PR4167 .J3 1882 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/41041653

Gift of estate of Susan B. Anthony, July 28, 1941.

Inscribed to: Susan B. Anthony in remembrance of a day at Haworth with H. Ford, October 20th 1883.

 


Brown, John.
Horae subsecivae. Rab and his friends and other papers. By John Brown, M. D. Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1882. 486 p.
PR4175 .B2 A7 1882 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/ltf91093020

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony with the affectionate regards of Elizth Pease Nichol. Huntly Lodge, Edinburgh, Augt. 4. 1883

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

John Brown (1810-1882) was a Scottish physician and essayist.

Elizabeth Pease Nichol (1807-1897), British abolitionist and suffragist, met Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the 1840 World Anti-slavery Convention in London.

 


Browning, Elizabeth Barrett.
Poems of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. New York, Boston: C. S. Francis & Co., 1857. 2 vols..
PR4180 .E57 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/39019436

Both vols. inscribed, possibly by Susan's mother: S. B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1858

Both vols. inscribed by Anthony: Presented to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, May 24, 1939

On laid in scrap of paper Anthony wrote: Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poems in two vol 1857, Aurora Leigh-Eth.B.B. 1857, Wants E [merson?] to go with them.

 


Browning, Elizabeth Barrett.
Aurora Leigh. By Elizabeth Barrett Browning. New York, Boston: C. S. Francis & Co., 1857. 366 p.
PR4185 .A1 1857a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/36021717

Inscribed: This book was carried in my satchel for years and read & re-read. The noble words of Elizabeth Barrett--as Wendell Phillips always called her-sunk deep into my heart. I have always cherished it above all other books. I now present it to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., with the hope that Women may more & more be like "Aurora Leigh" Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902.

Inscribed in pencil, possibly Susan's mother: S.B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. 1857

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, March 23, 1936.

 


Works of Robert Burns: containing his life by John Lockhart . . . . New-York: Leavitt & Allen, 1853. 425 p., 13 p. front. (port.)..
PR4300 1853 .N3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15019765

Inscribed: From my dear brother-Daniel Read Anthony in 1854. When our Father-Daniel Anthony-was a manufacturer in Battenville-Washington Co. N.Y. there was but one man a foreigner-all the other hundreds were native born-the women weavers &spinners & spoolers were from the adjoining farms. Then it was that my Mother got Mr. Van Slyk to read Burns to her-he was a Scotchman-and read with the real accent "A Man's a man for A that" &c-and delighted her. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

 


Chant, Laura Ormiston.
Verona and other poems. London: David Stott, 1887. v, 157 p.
PR4453 .C215 V4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15022893

Inscribed: To Miss Susan B. Anthony from one who hopes to be reckoned a dear friend-in memory of the prophetic and soul inspiring happiness enjoyed at the first International Council of Women held at Washington, U.S.A. March 1888. The sender of these poems is the writer of them. Sincerest admiration and love prompts this little gift. Laura Ormiston Chant. Glenora 13 Canfield Gardens. South Hampstead. July 25th/88 N.W.
Below the address Anthony wrote: London England.

Inscribed by Anthony: This I leave with my other books at the Congressional Library-for future generations to see the material we had to work with-Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st. Rochester N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Laura Ormiston Chant (1855-1923), English feminist, social activist, and writer, lectured in the U.S. on several occasions.

 


Cobbe, Frances Power.
Life of Frances Power Cobbe, by herself . . . Boston and New York, Houghton, Mifflin and company, 1895. 2 vols. front. port..
PR4461 .C3 Z5 1895 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15026714

Inscribed: Saml Wilder-From Maria Xmas 1895

Further inscribed: Miss Susan B. Anthony, With all good wishes. Maria Wilder Dupuy. Feby 1903. I hope these books will have Readers.

Inscribed by Anthony: and presented to the Library of Congress by Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1 1904

In volume 2, page 512, a note inscribed by Maria Dupuy: "Read this birthday address dear Miss Anthony," refers to Cobbe's verse to Lord Shaftesbury on his 80th birthday paying tribute to his work with the poor and helpless.

Samuel Wilder, a Rochester businessman, was the brother of Maria Wilder Dupuy (1830-1910).

 


Cullen, John.
Poems and idylls. By the Rev. John Cullen . . . London, S.W. Partridge & co., 1893.
PR4519 .C6 P6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16019751

Includes his poem "A Vision of Good Women," dedicated to "the women of America who advocate and work for the spread of liberty, temperance, literature, and art."

 


Curzon, Sarah Anne.
Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812: a drama, and other poems. Toronto: C. B. Robinson, 1887. 215 p.
PR4525 .C4 L3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16002665

Inscribed: To Miss S. B. Anthony and her sister Miss Mary, with the compliments of the Author. 20 October 1887

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Sarah Anne Curzon (1833-1898), English-Canadian journalist, playwright, and women's rights activist, used her literary abilities to educate. In addition to her drama celebrating female patriotism, this volume reprints Curzon's Sweet Girl Graduate, in which a woman poses as a man in order to demonstrate her ability to succeed in university studies.

 


Godwin, William.
Memoirs of M. Wollstonecraft Godwin. Philadelphia: Samuel Akerman, 1804. 155 p.(1-10 missing).
PR4719 .G5 G6 1804 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: S. B. Anthony 16 Jan 04

Godwin provides a biographical sketch of Wollstonecraft's life and work, including details of their courtship, their attitudes toward marriage, and her last days after delivery of their child.

 


Montefiore, Dora.
Singings through the dark. London: S. Low, Marston & company, limited, 1898. 76 p.
PR5029 .M79 S5 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17028274

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony "Our General" with the respect and admiration of one of the ranks of the International army. July 20th 1899

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester. N.Y. Jan.1. 1903.

Dora Fuller Montefiore (1851-1933) was a militant suffragist and socialist leader in England and Australia. Her book of verse includes poems entitled "The New Woman" and "Working Women's Jubilee."

 


Schreiner, Olive.
Dreams. New York: Mershon Co., 189?. 128 p., 109 p.
PR5299 .S4 D7 1890 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/41028196

Through the gates of gold by Mabel Collins is printed at the end with separate pagination. 109 p.

Inscribed: To the dear and great Aunt Susan B. Anthony from Miriam Foster Avery, Rose Foster Avery, Julia Foster Avery.

Inscribed by Anthony: Received from the darling sisters-Miriam, Rose, Julia-soon after their Moma's return from my 81st birthday Feb. 15. 1901. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. 1820-Feb. 15. 1901.

Inscribed by Anthony: Now-Jan. 1. 1903-this goes to the Congressional Library, Washington D.C. in regard to my 21 years right hand "man"-Rachel Foster Avery & her three children.

Olive Schreiner (1855-1920) was a South African writer, social activist, and supporter of universal suffrage and gender equality.

Mabel Collins (1851-1927) was the author of several theosophical works.

Rachel Foster Avery (1858-1919) helped Anthony plan and organize meetings of the National Woman Suffrage Association from 1880 onward, later serving as corresponding secretary.

 


Scott, Walter.
Lady of the lake; a poem. New York: J. Lomax, 1831. 232 p.
PR5308 .A1 1831 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16004680

Inscribed: My Mother would repeat the half, if not the whole, of the Lady of the Lake. This is in Memory of her-Lucy Read Anthony-and her wonderful memory. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Tennyson, Alfred.
Poems by Alfred Tennyson. London: Edward Moxon, 1846. 2 v. 232; 235 p.
PR5550 .E46a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/37010708

Vol 1. inscribed: Abigail Mott, From her Sincere and grateful Friend, Frederick Douglass. Manchester, Eng. 3d Dec. 1846

Further inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from her Friend Lydia Mott 1874

And inscribed by Anthony: In memory of my dear friend Abigail Mott and my longer and still more dear & helpful friend Lydia Mott-of Albany, N.Y. I present these two volumes to the Congressional Library, Washington. D. C. Susan B. Anthony 17. Madison Street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec, 25 1902

Vol 2. inscribed: Abigail Mott, From her Sincere and grateful Friend Frederick Douglass. Manchester Eng. 3d Dec. 1846.

Further inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from her friend Lydia Mott 1874

And inscribed by Anthony: These volumes were sent to Abigail Mott when Frederick Douglas was for the first time visiting England. The Misses Mott-Abigail and Lydia had earned his gratitude by teaching him to read & talk correctly and being all that mortals could be to him as friends. So in the name and in memory of the three-I give these little volumes to the Congressional Library, Washington D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Abigail Mott (1803-1850) and Lydia Mott (1807-1875) were Quaker abolitionists who welcomed reformers and fugitive slaves to their Albany home. Douglass' young daughter Rosetta stayed with the Motts while Frederick was in Great Britain in 1845-1847.

 


Tupper, Martin Farquhar.
Complete prose works of Martin Farquhar Tupper, esq. Hartford: S. Andrus & son, 1850. 527 p.
PR5699 .T5 1850a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15018375

 


Burleigh, George Shepard.
Maniac; and other poems, by George Shepard Burleigh. Philadelphia: J. W. Moore, 1849. 240 p.
PS1207 .B35 M3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15025653

Inscribed: S. B. Anthony, Rochester Oct. 15, 1850.

Inscribed by Anthony: To the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902.

 


Emerson, Ralph Waldo.
Essays by R. W. Emerson. Boston: Phillips, Sampson & co., 1854. 333 p.
PS1608 .A2 1854 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17016600

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from S. & H. M. R, Dec. 25. 1855

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, July 28, 1941

Annotated in pencil throughout.

 


Emerson, Ralph Waldo.
Representative men: seven lectures / by R.W. Emerson. Boston : Phillips, Sampson and Company, 1850. 285 p.
PS1621 .A1 1850 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/24010693

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from S & H. M. R, Dec. 15. 1855

Printed in pen: Anna. H. Shaw, Moylan. Pa.

Gift: Susan B. Anthony Estate, July 28, 1941

Susan's niece, Lucy E. Anthony, and Anna Shaw were co-executors of Susan B. Anthony's estate.

 


Harper, Frances E. W.
Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted. Philadelphia: Garrigues Brothers, 1892. 282 p. front. (port.)..
PS1799 .H7 I6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17017142

Inscribed: This is the most faithful to her race and to woman-Frances Ellen W. Harper. I knew her 50 years ago. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st. Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1.1903

 


Patton, Abby Hutchinson.
Handful of pebbles / by Abby Hutchinson Patton. Cambridge, Mass.: Riverside Press, 1891. 57 p.
PS2524 .P67 H3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17001447

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony-with sincere regard, of Abby Hutchinson Patton. New-york, June 17, 1891.

Inscribed by Anthony: The beautiful sister---Abby-the lovely Singer-the true friend. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Pasted on inside front cover: Ludlow Patton's December 1892 card acknowledging condolence. Newspaper clippings announcing Abby's death, November 24, 1892, are pasted on both the front and back endpapers.

Abby Hutchinson Patton (1829-1892) had sung with three of her brothers in the Hutchinson Family quartet before the Civil War, featuring anti-slavery songs composed by her brother Jesse. Both Abby and her husband Ludlow Patton worked with Anthony in the American Equal Rights Association.

 


Stowe, Harriet Beecher.
Uncle Tom's cabin; or, Life among the lowly. By Harriet Beecher Stowe. Boston, John P. Jewett & company; Cleveland, Jewett, Proctor & Worthington, 1852. 2 vols..
PS2954 .U5 1852f (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Vol 1: Susan B. Anthony stamp 21 Ap 03

Pasted before Title page: advertisement for Parley's Cabinet Library, 4 p.

Vol. 2: Inscribed in unknown hand: S. B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y

Inscribed by Anthony: To the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. for safe keeping for the generations to come-and be thankful that the crime of slavery is done away with-though we are still far from just to the negro. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25, 1902.

 


Stowe, Harriet Beecher.
Uncle Tom's cabin; or, Life among the lowly. By Harriet Beecher Stowe. Illustrated Edition. Boston, J.P. Jewett and company; Cleveland, O.: Jewett, Proctor, and Worthington, 1853. 560 p. illus..
PS2954 .U5 1853 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/19018265

Inscribed: Lydia Mott with regard of Wm. H. T., Jan. 1853

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from her friend L Mott, 1874

Inscribed by Anthony: From Wm. H. Topp to Miss Lydia Mott in 1853 and From Miss Lydia Mott-Susan B. Anthony in 1874 and From Susan B. Anthony to the Congressional Library in 1902.

Abigail & Lydia Motts house was the home of all of the abolitionists, Men & women, & Woman's Rights women who went before the Legislature in Albany-- or who were passing through that city--to the far west. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25.1902

William H. Topp was a colored man in Albany, New York-a splendid man-almost white-it was said that his father was a Schuyler. He was a Taylor by trade, he made the coats, vests, & pants for William H. Seward, John & Joshua Spencer and the very elite of Albany. Gerrit Smith of Peterboro, N.Y., Charles F. Hovey of Boston, Wm. Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips have sat at his table. His wife was a West Indian woman & very refined and Lydia Mott to whom he gave this copy of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was an abolitionist and the best friend of Mr. Topp & his family. S. B. A.

William H. Topp (1812-1857) was a black tailor and abolitionist leader in Albany.

 


Stowe, Harriet Beecher.
Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, comp. from her letters and journals, by her son Charles Edward Stowe. Boston, New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1891. xii, 530 p. ports..
PS2956 .A3 1891 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16007888

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony from her friend & love, Isabella Beecher Hooker, Hartford May 24. 1891

Inscribed by Anthony: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison S. Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Isabella Beecher Hooker (1822-1907), suffragist leader, was a half-sister of Harriet Beecher Stowe.

 


Coonley, Lydia Avery.
Under the pines, and other verses. Chicago, Way & Williams, 1895. 104 p.
PS3545 .A69 U5 1895 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16018435

Inscribed: Miss Anthony from Lydia Avery Coonley

Inscribed: Received on my dear Mothers 102d Birth-day Dec. 2d 1895. 17 Madison street Rochester N.Y. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison st Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Lydia Avery Coonley Ward (1845-1924), a poet and philanthropist, often entertained Susan Anthony and other suffrage leaders at her Hillside estate in Wyoming, New York.

 


Bolton, Sarah K.
The present problem. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1874.
PZ3 .B639P (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/06014907

Inscribed: With the great respect of Sarah H. Bolton. Cleveland. O, Nov. 13th/84

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street Rochester N.Y. Jan. 1. 1902

Sarah Knowles Bolton (1841-1916) was an American writer and active supporter of temperance, woman suffrage and women's higher education. In addition to editing the Boston Congregationalist, 1878-1881, she wrote poems, biographies, children's books, and this temperance novel.

 


Don Quixote de la Mancha. New York, D. Appleton and company, 1853. 495 p.
PZ3 .C337 D8 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16007014

Inscribed by Anthony: Dan'l R. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Presented to Niece Ann Eliza McLean, July 12. 1854-and doubtless read by her with avidity for she was a great reader-and now it is presented to the Congressional Library by her aunt Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902

 


Child, Lydia Maria.
Philothea; a Grecian romance. New York, C. S. Francis & co.; Boston, J. H. Francis, 1851. 290 p.
PZ3 .C437 P3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/16003395

Inscribed in an unknown hand: Susan B. Anthony, Apr. 1857

Inscribed: Lydia Maria Child was a great woman and contributed much to the early agitation for Equal Rights for Woman. In memory of her I present this to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25. 1902

 


Dickens, Charles.
Bleak house . . . With illustrations by H.K. Browne. New York, Harper & Brothers, 1853. 2 vols..
PZ3 .D55 Bl3 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/15021854

Vol. 1 inscribed: Bleak House was the favorite of my Mother's. She read it over & over again-and the characters were real living beings to her. The picture she has cut from something-I know not-but these books are sacred to me because so worn out with my dear mothers reading. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y, Dec. 25, 1902

Vol. 2. inscribed: 1854 D. Anthony Lucy Read Anthony. I present this to the Congressional Library in memory of my dear Mother who---with all of her hard work-found time to read these volumes through & through many times. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25. 1902

 


Harbert, Elizabeth Boynton.
Amore. Chicago: New Era Publishing Co., 1892. 278 p.
PZ3 .H2133 A2 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17022983

Inscribed: To Susan B. Anthony with greetings for the Christmas tide and the loving appreciation of the author.

Inscribed by Anthony: Elizabeth Boynton Harbert-Chicago (Evanston) Illinois-who has been a loyal friend ever since she came to Steinway Hall, New York Anniversary meeting as a Reporter for the press of Crawfordsville, Ind. 1869. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Elizabeth Boynton Harbert (1843-1925), author, editor, and prominent suffrage leader in Illinois, used her novel Amore as a vehicle to express her New Thought ideas that harmony is secured by combining differences and merging the highest positive qualities of men and women and that by seeking truth through love, social reforms may be successful and the human race may be perfected.

 


Taylor, Bayard.
Hannah Thurston: a story of American life. New York, G.P. Putnam, 1864. 464 p.
PZ3 .T212 H (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/08025654

Inscribed by Anthony: A. M. Mc Lean From his Sister Susan B. Anthony, Rochester Feb. 3. 1864.
To the Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Dec. 25. 1902

Bayard Taylor (1825-1878), American poet and travel writer, in this first novel portrays his heroine, Hannah Thurston, as a strong willed woman who gives up her women's rights activism upon marriage.

 


Keith, Thomas.
New treatise on the use of the globes, or, A philosophical view of the earth and heavens . . . / by Thomas Keith. New-York: Samuel Whiting & Co., and Samuel Wood, printer, 1811. 346 p. plates.
QB66 .K4 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Danl Anthony Otber 14th 1816

Inscribed by Anthony: This-1816-was when my father was a teacher in Nine Partner's Boarding School in Duchess County N.Y. Susan B. Anthony Dec. 25 1902

 


Lozier, Abraham W., comp.
In memoriam. Mrs. Charlotte Denman Lozier, M.D., died January 3, 1870. n. p., 1870. 33 p. front. (port.)..
R154 .L6 L6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82049136

Inscribed: The first wife of the son--Abram Lozier-of my excellent friend-Dr. Clemence S. Lozier-who opened her parlors for suffrage meetings for many years. Mrs. Stanton's 70th birthday was celebrated there on the evening of Mar. 12th 1885. Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton never spoke more beautifully-on the delights of old age-it is lost-to my great chagrin. Susan B. Anthony 17. Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan 1. 1903.

 


Lozier, Abraham W., comp.
In memoriam, Clemence Sophia Lozier, M.D. n. p., 1888. 71 p. front (port.)..
R154 .L62 L6 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/unk82049140

Inscribed: With kind regards of Dr. & Mrs. A. W. Lozier

Inscribed by Anthony: A noble and generous woman-she was a great help to me in carrying on "The Revolution." She not only gave me my board, but put her hand in her pocket and gave me $50 a week for a time. She was a good & true woman. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. Jan 1. 1903

 


Buchan, William.
Domestic Medicine, or, a treatise on the prevention and cure of diseases. Exeter: J.& B. Williams, 1828. xvii, [2], 20-495, xlviii p.
RC81 .B9 1828 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Dr. Buchan was the Law & gospel of my dear mother-Lucy Read Anthony from 1830. She read & knew everything this book contains-for years it was kept hidden away from us children--and when we would know its contents, she, to save us from a knowledge of Maternity, cut out the leaves from page 396 to page 423-and pasted over the table of Contents-page xxxvii-"The Right of Petition from John Quincy Adams' letter to his constituents"-- which must have been written in 1837-when I was 17 years old. And then the blotting out from the Index pages xxxix & xl-all references to the expurgated pages of the book. This all shows how carefully our mother watched over us that we might not know of the Mysteries of Life. Susan B. Anthony, December 25, 1902

The chapters removed by Lucy Anthony covered menstration, pregnancy, abortion, labor and child birth, and barrenness.

 


Grindrod, Ralph Barnes.
Bacchus. An essay on the nature, causes, effects, and cure of intemperance. By Ralph Barnes Grindrod. Hartford, S. Andrus & son, 1851. 512 p.
RC367 .G8 1851a (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17015825

Inscribed: Purchased in 1853. Presented to the Congressional Library. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Dec. 25, 1902

 


Guernsey, Egbert.
Homśopathic domestic practice, containing also chapters on physiology, hygiene, anatomy, and an abridged materia medica. New York, W. Radde; Philadelphia, Rademacher & Sheek, 1857. 653 p. 5 pl..
RX76 .G9 1857 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/17015831

Newspaper clippings on various related subjects pasted on four preliminary pages.

Inscribed: This Homeopathic Domestic Practice for "the well educated heads of families" must have been bought [by] my dear mother as early as 1858-and henceforth it became her authority-it took the place of old Dr. Buchan-and Dr. Guernsey was the law and Gospel. My sister Hannah L. Anthony Mosher visited us at the Farm-her child was taken violently ill. And when we got Dr. Matthews there-three miles in the country-he said they had given just the right medicine. My sister always carried a little case of medicines. Then in 1851 I had become acquainted with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and she was a believer in homeopathy, under Dr. Byard of New York, so with all these influences I have been a disciple of Homeoana from that day to this. Susan B. Anthony, Dec. 25. 1902.

 


James, C. L.
An Appeal to the Women of America in behalf of Liberty and Justice to and for the prosecuted and persecuted defenders of the Wives and Mothers of our Land. Topeka, Kansas: Moses Harman, Publisher, 1891. 12 p.
Z659 .J36 1891 (Anthony Coll)
Catalog Record: Not available

James is critical of the vice society using Comstock obscenity laws to censor and prosecute advocates of the sexual rights of married women.

 


Anthony, Susan B.
Letter to Chief of Order Division, Library of Congress, Feb. 10, 1903 with inventory of donated books shipped to Library. 15 p. Photostats..
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

 


Anthony, Susan B.
Letter from Miss Anthony. Dec. 25, 1899.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony. June 3, 1940

In her 80th year Anthony appeals to all men and women who believe in equal rights for women to make a New Year's pledge to do something or give something for the cause.

 


Celebration of the Eightieth Birthday of Susan B. Anthony, February 15, 1900. Program. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Lists participants and includes poem by Wm. Lloyd Garrison

 


Anthony Home Calendar 1901. Photographs by Frances Benjamin Johnston. n. p., 1900. 8 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Fundraising calendar includes quotes by Susan B. Anthony and photographs of her and her home.

 


Anthony, Susan B.
Woman Suffrage A Live Issue. n. p., 1906.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Newspaper proof sheet of article by Anthony, outlining progress in women's rights over last half century.

 


Birney, James G.
The American Churches, the Bulwarks of American Slavery. Third American Edition. Concord, N.H.: Published by Parker Pillsbury, 1885. 48 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Compliments of Parker Pillsbury, Dec. 13/86

Inscribed by Anthony: James G. Birney-who ran for President of the United States for the Liberty Party in 1844. It seems impossible that slavery could so brutalize men as to make something then. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Pillsbury wrote an introduction and reproduced Birney's 1842 edition to show the role of various churches in supporting slavery.

 


Black Book of England, Part 2: Executive Government. British Colonies. London: C. Mitchell, 1846. 97-168 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: H. C. Wright, Philadelphia

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y. Jan.1. 1903

 


Carey, Phoebe.
The Susan. reprinted from Rochester Chronicle, February 18, 1870. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony. June 3, 1940.

Poem composed for Susan B. Anthony's 50th birthday celebration reception. Lists attendees.

 


Catt, Carrie Chapman.
Do you know? Warren Ohio: National American Woman Suffrage Association Headquarters, 1909. 15 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940.

 


Catt, Carrie Chapman.
Perhaps. Warren Ohio: National American Woman Suffrage Association Headquarters, 1910. 16 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

 


Channing, William Henry.
Lessons from the life of Theodore Parker: a discourse. London: Edward T. Whitfield; Liverpool: Henry Young, 1860. 35 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Channing delivered this eulogy sermon for Parker at Hope Street Church, Liverpool, June 10, 1860.

 


Child, L. Maria.
The Patriarchal Institution, as described by Members of its own Family. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1860. 55 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Lydia Maria Child-a wonderful woman!! Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan.1. 1903

Child compiled quotes from southern slave holders, state laws and reward notices that shed light on the attitudes of southerners toward slavery.

 


Curtis, George William.
Equal Rights for All. George William Curtis in the New York State Constitutional Convention, 1867. Rochester, N.Y.: New York Constitutional Convention Campaign Committee, 1867. 24 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Anthony printed the remarks of Curtis in support of his proposed amendment to the New York Constitution to strike "man" from the suffrage clause.

 


Douglass, Frederick.
Lecture on Haiti. The Haitian pavilion dedication ceremonies delivered at the World's fair, in Jackson Park, Chicago, Jan. 2d, 1893. Chicago, 1893. 57 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Douglass was consul-general to Haiti, 1889-1891, and was serving as Haiti's commissioner to the Columbian Exposition in 1893.

 


Douglass, Frederick.
Oration, Delivered in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, by Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852. Rochester: Lee, Mann & Co., 1852. 39 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1.1903

Douglass explains that he cannot celebrate the Fourth of July while gross injustice and cruelty to slaves continues and while the Fugitive Slave Law reigns and the churches are indifferent or shield the slave-hunters.

 


Douglass, Frederick, et al.
The Reason Why the Colored American is not in the World's Columbian Exposition. Chicago: Ida B. Wells, 1893. 83 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y. Jan. 1. 1903

In an effort to counter being ignored and having their offered participation rejected by the organizers of the World's Columbian Exposition, black leaders wrote and distributed 20,000 copies of this pamphlet that presents aspects of African American history since Emancipation. Douglass reviews Southern efforts to disenfranchise blacks, prohibit intermarriage, and restrict economic opportunity, while embracing the convict lease system. Ida Wells reports on the increase in lynching of blacks for alleged, often unsubstantiated charges of rape, assault, and murder. I. Garland Penn discusses black progress in education, professions, business, and the arts. F. L. Barnett summaries the various efforts by black leaders, both men and women, to seek participation in the Columbian Exposition and the pervasive discrimination they experienced.

 


May, Samuel.
The Fugitive Slave Law and its Victims. New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856. 48 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Heinzen, Karl.
Mankind the Criminal. A Lecture delivered in Washington, D. C. by Karl Heinzen. Roxbury, Mass.: Office of "Pionier,", 1864.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Mr. Heinzen was a real friend of woman. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Karl Heinzen (1809-1880) founded the radical German-language newspaper Pionier, which supported abolition and woman suffrage. In this lecture he criticizes Sec. of State Seward's actions related to the French intervention in Mexico.

 


Holmgren, Ann Margret.
Susan B. Anthony, Amerikas Grand Old Woman. Stockholm: Albert Bonniers Boktryckeri, 1920. 47 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Inscribed: To Mrs. Ida Husted Harper with heartily thanks from Ann Margaret Holmgren

 


Howe, Julia Ward.
Mrs. Julia Ward Howe's Reply to Mrs. Humphry Ward. Warren, Ohio: National American Woman Suffrage Association Headquarters, 1908. 8 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Howe, President of the New England Woman Suffrage Association, counters Ward's assertion that organized opposition to woman suffrage has made the U. S. movement almost extinct. Howe offers statistics that demonstrate the strength of the suffrage movement and blames defeats of suffrage bills on inertia of conservatism of both men and women and opposition of the liquor interests.

 


Kramer, John Theophilus.
The Slave-Auction. Boston: Robert F. Walllcut, 1859. 48 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Kramer contends that slavery, especially the slave auction that tears families apart is not compatible with Christianity.

 


McCullogh, Catharine Waugh.
Facts Stronger than Fiction. New York: New York State Woman Sufrage Assocition, 1909. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Outlines legal protections of women and children in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and Idaho where women vote on the same terms as men.

 


May, Samuel J.
Speech of Samuel J. May, in the County Convention at Syracuse, October 14, 1851. Syracuse: Agan & Summers, Printers, Daily Standard Office, 1851. 28 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Rev. May urges citizens to disobey the Fugitive Slave Law.

 


Report of the Joint Committee of Management of the Miner Normal School. 1855. Washington, D.C., 1855.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Documents the organization and operation of the Miner Normal School, opened in 1851 by Myrtilla Miner to educate black youth in D.C. Lists graduates from 1880 to 1884, many of whom became public school teachers.

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
To the Senate and House of Representatives. n. p., 1899. 1 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

President Anthony and other NAWSA officers petition Congress requesting that equal suffrage be established the new territory of Hawaii.

 


National Ameriacan Woman Suffrage Association.
Thirty-Third Annual Convention Program, May 30 -June 5, 1901. Minneapolis, Minn., 1901. 14 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Anthony marked listings of her participation with blue pencil.

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Thirty-Eighth Annual Convention Program, February 7 to 13, 1906. Baltimore, Md., 1906. 26 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
The College Evening Program, February 8, 1906. n. p., 1906. 31 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Includes portrait of Susan B. Anthony and tributes of appreciation by Mary E. Wolley, President of Mount Hoyoke College; Lucy M. Salmon, Professor of History, Vassar College; Mary Jordan, Professor of English, Smith College; Mary Calkins, Professor of Philosophy, Wellesley College; Eva Perry Moore, President of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae; Maud May Wood Park, President of the Boston Branch of the Equal Suffrage League; and M. Carey Thomas, President of Bryn Mawr College.

 


National American Woman Suffrage Association.
Votes for Women on the Home Stretch. Campaign Rally, Carnegie Hall, March 30, 1914. n. p., 1914. 8 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Program for fund raising rally includes present and future suffrage maps.

 


New York University.
Hall of Fame for Great Americans Unveiling of the busts and tablets for Susan B. Anthony and Thomas Paine. May 18, 1952.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Program includes facsimile photos of Anthony, her house, and her letters with comments about the Revolution and her trial for voting in 1872.

 


Oregon Equal Suffrage Association.
Oregon Newspapers on Equal Suffrage. n. p., 1906. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Mary Anthony accompanied Anna Shaw on a speaking tour to rally support for the constitutional amendment on woman suffrage, but it was defeated for the third time in June 1906.

 


Phillips, Wendell.
Speeches on Rights of Women by Wendell Philips. New York: National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1898.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Includes speeches Phillips delivered in 1851, 1861 and 1866.

 


Wendell Phillips, signed photograph.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed on verso by Anthony: Presented to Susan B. Anthony during her last call on Mr. Phillips after her return from her first trip to Europe, December 1883 & with this Photo he gave to her his last great speech "The Scholar in a Republic."

Enclosed in envelop inscribed by Anthony: very Precious Photo of Wendell Phillips, his last taken at 70 & presented to S. B. A. in December 1883.

According to a 1936 note to Mr. Parma, former Library employee, this photo and two cut cardboard silhouettes, presumably of Ann and Wendell Phillips, were found inserted in "Ann Phillips, wife of Wendell Phillips, a memorial sketch, 1886."

In her inscription in the Journal of John Woolman, Anthony notes that in 1883 she received silhouettes of the Phillips from Elizabeth Pease Nichol that had been given to Nichol by the Phillips in 1840.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Capital versus Labor. New York: Robert J. Johnston, 1903?. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester. N.Y Jan. 1. 1903

Reprinted from The Revolution, which Pillsbury (1809-1898) edited with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1868-69.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
The Church as it is: or, the Forlorn Hope of Slavery. Boston: Bela Marsh, 1847. 90 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Writing primarily for distribution in Great Britain, Pillsbury cites documents from major American denominations as evidence that most American churches support slavery and chose not to use their power to abolish it.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
Ecclesiastical vs. Civil Authority; God in the Federal Constitution: Man and Woman Out. Concord, N.H.: Republican Press Association, 1890. 24 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st, Rochester, N.Y., Jan.11.1903.

Marginal marking throughout by Anthony's blue pencil, including Pillsbury's assertions that slaves were not emancipated for justice, but to save the union by allowing former slaves to fight.

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
The Plague and Peril of Monopoly: A Lecture on Labor, Laborers, and Employees, delivered in Lynn, Salem, Haverhill, and Georgetown, Mass., in the Autumn of 1882. Concord, N.H.: Republican Press Association, 1887. 35 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Pillsbury, Parker.
The Popular Religions, and what shall be instead. Concord, N.H.: Republican Press Association, 1891. 26 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Susan B. Anthony Memorial Association brochure. Rochester Committee, 1906. 2 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Lists Executive Committee and National Committee members for memorial association formed to raise $75,000 for erecting an Anthony memorial building at the University of Rochester for the use of women students.

 


Advertising Order form for Olive Schreiner's Woman and Labor. New York: Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1911. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 1 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Brochure describes Schreiner's book and includes quotes by critics.

 


Stanton, Elizabeth Cady.
To Susan B. Anthony on her eightieth birthday February 15, 1900. n. p., 1900. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stanton's poem recalls their many shared experiences fighting for the suffrage cause.

 


Sully, Richard.
Fallacies of the Protective System Exposed and the Effects of the Corn Laws Especially Considered. Manchester: J. Gadsby, 1841. 40 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Sully appeals for the end of restrictive laws and supports free trade as good for all classes.

 


Sumner, Charles.
Powers of Congress to Prohibit Inequality, Caste, and Oligarchy of the Skin. Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner, of Massachusetts, delivered in the Senate of the United States, February 5, 1869. Washington: F. & J. Rives & Geo A. Bailey, 1869. 8 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts said to me in the spring of 1874 I think it was "Put sex where I have race or color in this speech and you have the strongest argument that I can make for the Enfranchisement of Women." Susan B. Anthony

Sumner proposes that Congress secure equal suffrage for blacks by law rather than by amendment, thus avoiding states' rights consideration.

 


The Declaration of Independence, A Masterpiece: But How it Got Mutilated! Washington, D. C., 1881. 11 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

W. H. B. alleges that the original draft of the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Paine and that the paragraph regarding slavery that was later stricken could not have been written by either Jefferson or Adams.

 


Vote on Women Taxpayers' Bill, 1901 New York, 1901. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Legislative history of New York law, passed in April 1901, which allows women property owners to vote on village and town propositions to raise money by tax or assessment. Identifies all members of New York legislature voting for and against the measure.

 


Ward, Lydia Avery Coonley.
Love's Rosary. n. p., 1900. 4 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

Poem to celebrate Susan B. Anthony's 80th birthday, February 15, 1900.

 


Whipple, Charles K.
The Family Relation, as Affected by Slavery. Cincinnati, Ohio: American Reform Tract and Book Society, 1858. 24 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Working Men's Association.
An Address from the Working Men's Association, to the Working Classes on the subject of National Education. London: Cleave, 1837. 8 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: H. C. Wright from Wm. Lovett, London 1847

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N. Y., Jan. 1. 1903

William Lovett, London cabinet maker was a founder in 1836 and secretary of the London Working Men's Association and later leader of the Chartist movement to expand democratic representation in Parliament.

In this Address the association contends that local school committees, elected annually by all adult males and females, should manage all educational operations and chose teachers, while the school buildings should be a national expense. All students, male and female, should be encouraged to seek higher education and schools should offer adult education in the evenings.

 


Wright, Henry C.
First Day Sabbath not of divine appointment, with the opinions of Calvin, Luther, . . . and others. A Letter to the Committee of the Edinburgh Emancipation Society. Glasgow: William Symington Brown, 1846. 48 p.
(Anthony Coll - Miscellaneous Ephemera, Unclassified. Box 2 of 2.)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1.1903

Wright notes that anti-slavery is a question of humanity, not of sect or nation. Furthermore he believes that men should consecrate every day to God, not just the Sabbath.

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol. 16/17 1846-47. Boston, 1846.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed in unknown hand: From Amy Post, Mary H. Hallowell, Susan B. Anthony

Inscribed by Anthony: These books-from 1846 to 1865-were taken from the old papers of Elias & Rhoda DeGarmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell, Daniel & Lucy Anthony. The Liberator was the law and the gospel to them and it was read religiously by them & their families. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) founded the Liberator, a weekly anti-slavery newspaper in 1831 to encourage the cause of immediate emancipation and continued publication until 1865. The Liberator also because a strong supporter of women's rights, especially woman suffrage.

Rhoda DeGarmo (1798-1873), Amy Post (1802-1889) and her step daughter Mary Post Hallowell (1823-1913) were all radical Quakers and anti-slavery activists. DeGarmo and Post were also early proponents of women's rights and helped organize the August 1848 Rochester Women's Rights Convention.

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol. 22 1852. Boston, 1852.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed on pasted in paper slip: There is missing the volume which contains the years 1850 & 51-it was loaned and never brought back. These papers were found in the old files of Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony-and were all religiously read by the four families and their neighbors and friends. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol. 24/25 1853-55. Boston, 1853.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This book contains the years of 1854 & 1855 and was gathered from the old files of the Liberator taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol. 26/27 1856-57. Boston, 1856.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These papers were rescued from the old files of the Liberator & Natl Standard taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They had been read & re-read by them & their families & neighbors-so they had done good service before they were bound in this volume. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol.28/29 1858-59. Boston, 1858.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: As I read over the stiring words spoken by all these Men-Phillips, Garrison, Pillsbury, I marvel that the nation was so long in getting stired to its depths and then I marvel that the men did not see that the quest of Liberty & peace could not be settled until all the people-women as well as men were enfranchised-had the power to make & enforce the laws. These papers were taken from the files of Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They had been read & re-read by them, their families & neighbors & friends-And now they go with all their blessed memories to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. from Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol.30/31 1860-61. Boston, 1860.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These papers were gathered from those taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They were read & re-read & were the laws & the gospel to them-but with all the hallowed memories of 1860 & 61-the outbreak of the war of the Rebellion-they are now consigned to the Congressional Library, Washington D. C. by Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Garrison, William Lloyd, ed.
The Liberator. Vol. 34/35 1864-65. Boston, 1864.
E449.L678 fol. set 2 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These Liberators were taken from those of Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony & close the Horrid Institution of Slavery and close the publication of The Liberator-the fearless-these two years 1864-65-but alas woman is left unthought of uncared for-except as the adjunct of man. Hereafter she must fight alone for her recognition. This goes to the Congressional Library. Washington, D. C. from Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


Collins, John A., ed.
Monthly Offering. Volume 1 (1841). Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1841. vi, 184 p. Ribbon-embossed cloth binding..
E449.M78 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Monthly Offering published in 1840 & 1841 by John A. Collins. Presented by her friend Lydia Mott, Albany, N. Y. and now given to the Congressional Library Washington, D. C. by Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st. Rochester, N. Y. December 25, 1902

Boston abolitionist John A. Collins (1810-1879) was a lecturer and fundraiser for the American Anti-Slavery Society. Between July 1840 and December 1842 he edited this Society serial as a means of educating the general public to the evils of slavery and encouraging contributions to the cause of immediate emancipation. No issues were published between March and August 1841 while Collins was fundraising in England. Maria Weston Chapman, Wm. Lloyd Garrison, J. G. Whittier, and Lydia Maria Child were frequent contributors.

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 15-16 (May 1854 - May 1856). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1854.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These were as nearly complete files as could be made from the old papers saved by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Susan B. Anthony or her father & mother Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They have been read & re-read by members of the four respective families and many of their neighbors & friends. They tell of times that tried men & womens souls! They are given to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 17-18 (May 1856 - May 1858). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1856.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Anti-Slavery Standard were gathered, here rescued from the old papers from Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony and are as nearly complete files as could be made. The papers have been read & re-read by the families of the four & their neighbors & friends. They are precious legacies transmitted to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 18-20 (May 1858 - May 1860). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1858.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This book of 1858 & 1859 was made up from the papers taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell and Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They were read and re-read by the four families & their neighbors & friends. This included the John Brown year-he was hung Dec. 2, 1859, on which evening we had a meeting in dear old Corinthian Hall-Parker Pillsbury making the main address of which Saml. D. Porter said it was the only occasion that ever matched Parker Pillsbury's adjectives-he might use the superlative degree and not seem extravagant!! This I present to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., January 1. 1903.

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 21-22 (May 1860 - May 1862). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1860.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These six volumes from 1854 to 1865 were rescued from the papers taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony and this book of 1860-61 was read & re-read by all of their families & by their neighbors & friends. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., January 1. 1903

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 23-24 (May 1862 - May 1863). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society., 1862.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The volume of 1862 & 1863 is near a complete file as could be gathered from the papers taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony. They were religiously read by all the four families and their friends-and the hope that the war would end slavery made them all forego their non-resistant doctrine for the moment. These were fearful times-the two sections arrayed against each other in war. An account of the Women's League will be found on May 2d, 23d, & 30th of 1863. The Congressional Library, Washington, D.C. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

 


American Anti-Slavery Society.
National Anti-Slavery Standard. Vol. 25-26 (May 1864 - May 1866). New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1864.
E449.N28 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This is the last of the six volumes-or books from the year 1864 to 1865-the Close of the war. They were all from 1854 to 1865-eleven years taken from the papers taken by Elias & Rhoda De Garmo, Isaac & Amy Post, William & Mary Hallowell & Daniel & Lucy Anthony and were read and re-read by them and their families & friends & neighbors. The Congressional Library, Washington, D.C. Susan B. Anthony 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Further inscribed: See May 28, 1864 for report of the Women's Loyal League. They suspended all work for woman's enfranchisement during the war and rolled up a petition of 365,000 for immediate emancipation-feeling sure woman's turn would come next-but alas it has not come yet-a whole forty years and still we wait. Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico, the Philippines & perchance Cuba-1903 and how much longer. SBA

 


The Revolution. Vol. 1-5. (January 8, 1868 - May 26, 1870). New York: Susan B. Anthony, 1868.
HN51 .R5 (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: http://lccn.loc.gov/10000660

Vol. 1-2, 2d set. January 8, 1868-December 31, 1868, 416 p.
Inscribed by Anthony: Lucy Read Anthony From her Daughter Susan B. Anthony [1868]
Inscribed further below line: My dear Mother would have been 109-old Dec. 2, 1902. This was given to her with a great deal of pride. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1902(sic/3)

Vol.3-4, 2d set, January 7, 1869-December 31, 1869, 416 p.
Inscribed: Lucy Read Anthony From her daughter Susan Anthony
Inscribed further below line: And today I look back on the hard work to cary (sic.) this big load with wonder how it was done.
Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Vol. 3-4: Another copy.
Inscribed: This is but one volume-or any year-of the Revolution-but there is left the first year that contains the Mary Wollstonecraft's Rights of Woman-- written 1790-one and thirteen years ago-that is worth saving for The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Feb. 15, 1903

Vol. 5, 2d set. January 6, 1870-May 26. 1870, 336 p.
Inscribed: Lucy Read Anthony From her "Strong Minded" Daughter
Susan B. Anthony, Rochester Dec. 25th 1870.
Inscribed further below line: This was the end-May 26, 1870, of my experiment in Newspaperdom.
Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1903
Inscribed further on attached scrap sheet: A Perfect File Presented by S. B. A. at time of publication to her Mother Lucy Read Anthony-in 1868, 1869 & 1870-The Revolution.

Vol. 1-2 Another Copy (one of a dozen copies with similar inscriptions)
Inscribed: This single volum II of The Revolution, published through 1868-69 and to June 1870 contains the book out of print now "The Rights of Woman" by Mary Wollstonecraft, written in 1790-- one hundred and thirteen years ago-showing intelligent women were never content to be ignored in the statute books and in real life anywhere. The Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester N.Y., February 15, 1903

Vol. 1-2 Another Copy
Inscribed: This volume II of the Revolution contains "The Rights of Woman" by that wonderful woman-Mary Wollstonecraft. Written in 1790 and worthy the students attention in whatever age he or she may live. The Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester N.Y., February 15, 1903

Vol. 1-2 Another Copy
Inscribed: This volume II of The Revolution contains "The Rights of Woman" by Mary Wollstonecraft written in 1790-showing that intelligent women saw the injustice of their position one hundred and thirteen years ago. It will be well for the student of history to note this fact. The Library of Congress, Washington D.C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester N.Y., February 15, 1903

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 1. (1870). 1870.
HQ1101.W6 1870 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Phebe A. Hanaford, New Haven, Conn., 1871

Inscribed: These papers have been cut-only reports of the American Woman suffrage Association's report of their Annual meeting-they cut out for the making of the Chapter in Vol. II of the History of Woman Suffrage. Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Phebe Hanaford (1829-1921), anti-slavery and women's rights activist, was serving as a Universalist pastor in New Haven between 1870 and 1874.

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 2. (1871). 1871.
HQ1101.W6 1871 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These six books were mutilated to make the Chapter on the American W.S. Association for the second volume of History of Woman Suffrage & now put in the Congressional Library. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 3. 1872.
HQ1101.W6 1872 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Some issues are stamped: Phebe A. Hanaford.

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 4. (1873). 1873.
HQ1101.W6 1873 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The reports of the American Woman Suffrage Association are cut from this book-I think nothing else. They were cut out to make the Chapter on that association in Vol. II of the History of Woman Suffrage. Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Some issues are stamped: Phebe A. Hanaford

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 5. (1874). 1874.
HQ1101.W6 1874 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These were cut to make the Chapter in 2d volume of the History of Woman Suffrage. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Some issues are stamped: Phebe A. Hanaford

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 6. (1875). 1875.
HQ1101.W6 1875 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: These papers we cut to make the chapter on the American W. S. Association in Vol II of the History of Woman Suffrage. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 24. (1893). 1893.
HQ1101.W6 1893 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Congressional Library, Washington, D.C. Now coming back to the national-I took The Woman's Journal-and had them bound year by year. I don't find 1890-91 & 92 here-but hence forth they are complete. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Marked with Anthony's blue pencil throughout.

 


Woman's Journal. Boston. Vol. 25-30, 32 (1894 - 1899, 1901). 1894.
(Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

All inscribed: Congressional Library Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

 


National Citizen and Ballot Box. Toledo, Ohio and Syracuse, N.Y. 6 vols in one binding. (April 1876 - October 1881). 1876.
JK1880 .N3 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This Ballot Box -started in 1876-was the first paper friendly to the National W. S. Association after the dispension of The Revolution in 1870. So we had, for six years, no representation in the woman suffrage press. The Ballot Box was edited by Mrs. Sarah R Langsdon Williams of Toledo-who transferred it to Mrs. Matilda Joslyn Gage, Syracuse, N.Y. and added the name of National citizen-so sure was Mrs. Gage and many others that U.S. citizenship carried with it-the suffrage-and it will too-in the by and by when political expediency is rolled away. This goes to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. from Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903.

Inscribed in unknown hand:

With Vol. 3. No. 2. May 1878, the name of the paper was changed from "The Ballot Box" to "The National Citizen and Ballot Box" and place of publication was changed to Syracuse, N. Y.

Bound at back of this volume:
The Genius of Liberty. Cin, Ohio. Vol 2, No. 10. Jul 18 1853, The Women's Temperance Paper. New York. Vol 1, No. 9. Mc 1855, Windham County Gazette, Brattleboro, Vt. Vol 17, No. 37, June 22, 1853, Woman's Advocate. Phila. Pa. Vol 1 Nos. 3,5, Jan. 27. Feb. 10. 1855

The Windham County Gazette is not currently included and only a cut stub remains in the bound compilation between the Women's Temperance Paper and the Woman's Advocate.

From the beginning of Matilda Gage's editorship in May 1878 onward, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were listed as corresponding editors.

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol.1-4 (Nov. 1883 - Nov. 1887). Beatrice, Nebraska., 1883.
JK1880 .W7 1887 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This Woman's Tribune made its appearance one year after the defeat in Nebraska-when nearly 26,000 men voted for woman suffrage & The paper is continued today just 20 years. It was removed from Beatrice Nebraska about 1889-to Washington D. C. It has made a heroic struggle for life-but it has survived and I give this first volume to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Clara Bewick Colby (1846-1916) served as President of the Nebraska State Women's Suffrage Association and editor of the Woman's Tribune, 1883-1904, which was the official paper for the National Woman Suffrage Association, 1886-1889.

 


The Woman's Tribune. Beatrice, Nebraska. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 5 (Dec. 1887-88). Beatrice, Nebraska, 1887.
JK1880.W7 1887 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Woman's Tribune, The Congressional Library, Washington D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, Jan. 1. 1903

Mary S. Anthony's name is penned in the margins of many issues, suggesting that she was the subscriber.

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 6 (Dec. 1888 - 89). Beatrice, Nebraska., 1888.
JK1880 .W7 1889 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 7 (1890). Beatrice, Nebraska and Washington, D.C., 1890.
JK1880 .W7 1890 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Woman's Tribune I give to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 8 (1891). Beatrice, Nebraska and Washington, D.C., 1891.
JK1880 .W7 1891 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Woman's Tribune to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 9 (1892). Beatrice, Nebraska and Washington, D.C., 1892.
JK1880 .W7 1892 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 10 (1893). Washington, D.C., 1893.
JK1880 .W7 1893 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Woman's Tribune is given to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. by Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 11 (1894). Washington, D.C., 1894.
JK1880 .W7 1894 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Tribune-Woman's--is given to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. by Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 12 (1895). Washington, D.C., 1895.
JK1880 .W7 1895 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Woman's Tribune is given to the Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. by Susan B. & Mary S. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


The Woman's Tribune. Clara Bewick Colby, Editor. Vol. 13 (1896). Washington, D.C., 1896.
JK1880 .W7 1896 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The year 1896 heralds a new star in our Union of true republics-Utah-we now have three states-Wyoming, Colorado & Utah-and at the election of 1896-we are given the 4th-Idaho-with four stars on our flag we go-till we set another state-when will it be? This same year tells of our losing California-110,000 men voted for woman suffrage-and 127,000 against-nearly 20,000 more against! A considerable amount of education needed yet!
The Congressional Library, Washington D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 1 (1848-1864). 1848.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This book was begun in 1870 or 71 and from it has grown 26 of these large old account books given me by several of the business men of Rochester. This begins with 1848---and the last one closes with 1900. The scraps are not by any means a continuous story of the suffrage movement-but clippings from all sources on all questions-such as they are-I give them to the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1. 1903

Further inscribed by Anthony: These Teacher certificates were given by County Superintendent William Wright, Washington County in 1845 where both my sister Hannah (Mosher) & I taught school for many years. My father & mother moved to Rochester, N.Y. in the fall of 1845.

Teacher certificates for Hannah Anthony and Susan B. Anthony are dated February 28, 1843.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 2 (1865-1868). 1865.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This scrap has a new cover-the old one was broken in parts. These were times that "tried women's souls" to see the "Negro" go into the kingdom of politics before women-we shouted but to no avail. The Library of Congress. Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Volume begins with clippings on assassination of Abraham Lincoln and covers the Equal Rights Association Convention, Albany, N.Y. 1866.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 3 (1869-1871). 1869.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This Scrap-book is given to show how carefully and yet how imperfectly I kept the clippings. I gathered these incidentally-did not take or know of a "Clipping Bureau" in those days-but I hand it down to future generations-the Evil report of us-as well as the good. Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Volume covers Anna Dickinson's lectures on woman suffrage in California, July 1869; the first American Woman Suffrage Convention in Cleveland Ohio, November 1869; and unsuccessful efforts in 1870 to unite the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 3a (1870-1871). 1870.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Cover Label Inscribed by Anthony: Vol. IV Book A
XIV Amendment Ratified Jul. 20/68
XV Amendment Ratified March 30/70
Arguments, Petitions &c for right to vote under them:
lst Francis & Virginia Minor of St. Louis 1869
Victoria Woodhull-B. F. Butlers Report 1871
Charles Sumner 1869 -A. G. Riddle/71 Theodore Tilton
Senator Matt. Carpenter--Horace Greeley

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 4 (1871-1873). 1871.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Vol. IV. This Scrap-book contains an account of my voting in 1872-though the full account of that episode is in separate books-they are in Vol. IV A, Vol. IV B, Vol. IV C & Vol. IV D. The arguments therefor and all the trial &c. Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap '03

No scrapbook labeled by Anthony IV D has been found, but no scrapbook appears to be missing.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 4a (1872-1873). 1872.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Cover Label Inscribed by Anthony: Vol IV Book B. Susan B. Anthony and 14 others Voting at Nat 3d Election 1872 Grant & Wilson campaign

Inscribed: This is the beginning of my Trial for having voted Nov 5 1872.
The Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Further Inscribed: 1872 The Election Nov. 5 1872 at which women in several states tried to vote-Michigan, Missouri, Connecticut, Ohio, New York &c

At end of volume preceding a Manuscript of 5 p. is note in Anthony's hand:
Manuscript of Mrs. Matilda Joslyn Gage found among old papers by S.B.A.-Sept 1897-written immediately after the trial of Miss Anthony. Probably Mrs. Gage felt the enormity of the action of Judge Hunt more than any other officer of the National Woman Suffrage Association because of her having volunteered and helped Miss A. to canvass every Post Office District of Ontario County the tree weeks previous to the trial-and being an eye & ear witness of the entire proceedings on that memorable day-June 17, 1873.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 5 (1872). 1872.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Cover Label Inscribed by Anthony: Vol. IV Book C 1872. Court Report of SBA's Trial Senator Roscoe Conkling's citation of the Committee of Fifteen-showing that the 14th Amendment was meant for other purposes than the Negros rights

Inscribed: This court report is full and there are various other things-the petition for remission of fine &c &c. Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Inscribed: This is the Court Report of my Trial for voting-Nov. 5, 1872. To the Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes 1874 newspaper clippings re trial, imprisonment and pardon of inspectors of elections; House and Senate action on Anthony's petition for remission of her fine for voting; January 1873 clippings from Woman's Campaign; February 1874 Daily Times, Leavenworth, Kansas, coverage of National Woman Suffrage Association Convention and Susan B. Anthony's comments on her trial; 1875 Supreme Court decision in the Virginia Minor case; and clipping coverage of the 1878 civil rights case and the 1882 California tax case testing the scope of the 14th and 15th amendments.
Page 141: Handwritten transcript of excerpts from 1868 Supreme Court case, Silver v. Ladd, which concludes that in the 1850 Oregon homestead act, the term "single man" in the generic sense embraced an " unmarried woman." Susan B. Anthony notes:
"The Homestead Law of Congress, Sept. 27, 1850 with Supreme Court Decision that he, his, & him cover woman-told to me in Overland train when coming home from California Dec. 1871 by Senator John Mitchell of Oregon." At the end of the transcript, in Anthony's hand: "Copied by Martha C Wright of Auburn.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 5a (1873-1879). 1873.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Labeled by Susan B. Anthony: "Vol. V."

Inscribed: This Scrap-book I give to the Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

This volume covers testimony before the New York Constitution Commission in February 1873; The National Woman Suffrage Association Conventions, 1873-1879; and nation-wide responses to the 1876 Declaration and Protest call to sign a petition requesting a national suffrage amendment. Also covers Gerrit Smith's funeral in December 1874 and includes 1879 poster advertising Anthony's lecture "Woman wants Bread, not the Ballot."

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 6 (1880-1882). 1880.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Vol.VI. These 32 Scrap-books contain very nearly the history of the woman movement from 1837 -1900-scrapping most if it-but nevertheless one can gather an idea of the spirit with which the demand for larger liberty for woman was met. The Library of Congress, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 7 (1883-1884). 1883.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Inscribed: My trip to Europe with Rachel G. Foster for escort, 1883. Death of Wendell Philipps in 1884. To the Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 8 (1885 - 1886). 1885.
JK1896 .A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: To the Congressional Library, Washington D. C., from Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903.

Near a February 7 1885 clipping summarizing Senator Palmer's speech favoring woman suffrage, Anthony wrote: This synopsis of Senator Palmer's Speech was in every daily that took the associated press news.

Preceding December 1886-January 1887 coverage of Congressional committee hearings on a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution extending the right of suffrage to women, Anthony wrote: "The following is the first discussion on the direct question of a 16th amendment.

Volume includes coverage of the 1885 and 1886 Washington, D. C. conventions of the National Woman Suffrage Association; coverage of the October 1885 convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association and 70th birthday tributes to Elizabeth Cady Stanton in November 1885.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 9 (1887). 1887.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes Lillie Devereux Blake's January 1887 address to the New York legislature asking that women citizens be allowed to vote for delegates to the state Constitutional Convention and coverage of the January 1887 Washington, D. C. convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the November 1887 National Prohibition Conference in Chicago.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 10 (1888). 1888.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes January 1889 hearings before the Congressional committee on woman suffrage.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 11 (1889). 1889.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the January 1889 Washington, D. C. convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association; coverage of Leavenworth municipal elections, where Susan campaigned on behalf of her brother Daniel R. Anthony, who lost his mayoral race as a Prohibitionist; sketches of the wives of President Harrison's cabinet and diplomats; and coverage of Mary Livermore's historical pageant in Boston and Hartford depicting women's influence on history. Clippings from the Omaha Republican, Aug. 4, 1889, discuss Amelia Bloomer's contributions to dress reform and include two sketches of bloomers.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 12 (1890). 1890.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the February 1890 Washington, D. C. convention of the merged National American Woman Suffrage Association and clippings of the Congressional hearings on suffrage.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 13 (1890). 1890.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison st., Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Next to a copy of the Remonstrance Special South Dakota Edition, against woman suffrage, Anthony wrote: Large mail sacks of this sheet were sent to Mitchell and a copy placed in seats of that Republican Convention Hall and scattered broadly through the city.

Includes extensive coverage of South Dakota equal suffrage amendment campaign with sheet music, "O Sing of Wyoming" dedicated to Susan B. Anthony; the South Dakota Equal Suffrage Song Book; and a 9-page typescript "The Campaign of 1890 in South Dakota" by Elizabeth Murry Wardall, Secretary of the South Dakota Equal Suffrage Association.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 14 (1891). 1891.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the conventions of the National Council of Women and the National American Woman Suffrage Association and letters of support from British women's suffrage societies.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 15 (1892). 1892.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D. C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903.

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the National American Woman Suffrage Association Convention, Congressional hearings on woman suffrage, efforts to get a woman suffrage plank in the platforms of the Republican and Democratic parties, and state woman suffrage meetings in Kansas, Iowa, and Ohio.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 16 (1893). 1893.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the National American Woman Suffrage Association Convention, state meetings in Connecticut and Pennsylvania, legislative successes in Michigan and New York, and the World's Congress in Chicago.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 17 (1894). 1894.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes coverage of the National American Woman Suffrage Association Convention, Congressional hearings on woman suffrage, several state conventions, and anti-suffrage sentiments.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 18 (1894). 1894.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Includes extensive coverage of New York Constitutional Amendment County Campaign organized by the New York State Woman Suffrage Association to influence the New York Constitutional Convention to recognize equal suffrage; typescript list of chairmen of the New York County Campaign Committees; Anthony's manuscript schedule of her January talks for county campaigns.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 19 (1894). 1894.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison Street, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Extensive coverage of the Kansas campaign in support of a woman suffrage amendment. Despite county mass meetings throughout May and June, led by Susan Anthony, Anna Shaw and Carrie Chapman Catt, the amendment was defeated in November.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 20 (1895). 1895.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: Congressional Library, Washington, D.C., Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y., Jan. 1, 1903

Stamped: Gift of Susan B. Anthony, 2 Ap' 03

Press coverage and Anthony's manuscript notes on her Southern tour with Carrie Chapman Catt in January 1895, preceding the National American Woman Suffrage Association convention in Atlanta. Also includes coverage of the National Council of Women's meeting, memorials to Frederick Douglass, and reports of Anthony's "fainting" in Lakeside, Ohio, in July.

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 21 (1895). 1895.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This California campaign was the most systematic & general that was ever made-we attempted forming a committee in every Election District of the state and every county that we had such efficient Com was carried-so we feel sure that this is the way to proceed in a campaign. To Mrs. Ellen G. Sargent--who opened her home for headquarters-we owe a great debt. The Congressional Library, Washington, D. C. The hard work of these state campaigns cannot well be measured. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 22 (1896). 1896.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: This book, save the annual meeting at Washington, D. C.-is the real California campaign-1896-when we should have beaten the record had not the Chairman of the state Republicans sold out our Cause to the Liquor Interest. Read and see. The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 23 (1897). 1897.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: If defeated in California-- we were victorious in Idaho by the decision of the supreme court-the first I think in all history that a Court had taken a road such and given a decision favorable to liberty of woman. All Hail to the Court of Idaho. The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 24-25 (1898). 1898.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 26 (Jan-Apr 1899). 1899.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Inscribed: We are nearing the end of the Century. These 33 volumes contain only half of the 1900 years-There was no record kept prior to 1848 but what we get here & there incidentally shows that women before that date were struggling with their disabilities--and inwardly--and sometimes spoke out-protested against the injustice--that everywhere surrounded them. The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 27-28 (May-December 1899). 1899.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Both volumes inscribed: The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 29 (1900). 1900.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Cover label inscribed by Anthony: 1900 National Suffrage Convention & 80th birthday of S. B. A. & Cardinal Gibbons on Suffrage

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 30 (1900). 1900.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Cover label inscribed by Anthony: 1900 National Convention, 80th birthday and Lynchings Vol XXX

Inscribed: This finishes the records of the Scrap-books-33 in number. There are Vol.IV a, b, &c in addition to the 30. I now leave the History writing-- as well as making, to my young friends & coworkers-Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, Rev. Anna H. Shaw & others-They are the first of the early seed-sowing. May they not have to work to the end of their days to secure the right to represent themselves-as have so many who began this public movement! But that future generations of women may see & learn of the struggles that the pioneers went through-I give these Scrap-books and all they contain that is false --as well as true--to The Congressional Library, Washington D. C. Susan B. Anthony, 17 Madison street, Rochester, N.Y. Jan. 1. 1903

 


Anthony, Susan.
Scrapbook 31 (1885-1898). 1885.
JK1896.A6 fol. (Anthony Coll - Folios)
Catalog Record: Not available

Gift: Lucy E. Anthony, June 3, 1940

This scrapbook is a smaller size format and covers briefly the time period 1885-1898 that is covered extensively in eighteen of the scrapbooks created and inscribed by Susan B. Anthony. Handwritten notes identifying the sources of the clippings throughout are not by Susan B. Anthony. Possibly this scrapbook was compiled by Mary Anthony.

 



  Top of Page
Top of Page
  Home >> Special Collections >> Susan B. Anthony Collection
  The Library of Congress >> Researchers
  February 15, 2017
Legal | External Link Disclaimer

Contact Us:  
Ask a Librarian