{ site_name: 'Places in History', subscribe_url:'/share/sites/Bapu4ruC/placesinhistory.php' }

1861, August 10th. Aerial Reconnaissance, Sewell’s Point, Virginia

Aerial reconnaissance, August 10, 1861 : [Sewells Point, Virginia]

Aerial reconnaissance, August 10, 1861 : [Sewells Point, Virginia]

Aerial reconnaissance was first used in 1861 by the War Department using balloons tethered to the ground. Early balloon observers were civilian employees of the Army, sometimes referred to as “Aeronauts”, who ascended in baskets attached to the balloons to survey battlefields, make troop observations, and prepare maps based on those observations.  Read More

1861, August 17th. Kentucky and Tennessee

New map of Kentucky and Tennessee

New map of Kentucky and Tennessee

With the advent of hostilities in April 1861, both Union and Confederate armies sought cartographic information from any source available. This general map of Kentucky and Tennessee indicates roads and railroads, county names and boundaries, cities and towns, rivers, and topography, with a several color annotations. A nearly illegible pencil note in the lower right corner states that this map was "Turned into Bureau of Tpl. Eng. by Lieut. O. M. Poe, Top. Engr., August 1861, referred [to] in his letter of Aug. 17, 1861."  Read More

1861, September 7th. Southern United States

Lloyd's map of the southern states

Lloyd's map of the southern states

A fine example of commercial cartography is “Lloyd's map of the Southern States, showing all the railroads, their stations & distances: also the counties, towns, villages, harbors, rivers, and forts…” first issued on September 7, 1861 by James T. Lloyd. In addition to the map of the South, Lloyd provides an extensive gazetteer on the verso describing each county’s geography, drainage, rail road lines, and major cities in the South, only six months after the war began...  Read More