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   Issue 7/8, Winter 2006/Spring 2007

 Hanjin company container ship at port in the Port of Vancouver

Introduction

As corporations become more global in their scope and international trade continues to expand, economies are becoming more and more integrated through trade, global financial exchange, foreign investment, as well as through the movement of people. This important phenomenon requires a greater understanding of the dynamics of global economics and its characteristics.

In addition, as trade continues to grow worldwide, global institutions addressing issues such as economic development and trade are also becoming increasingly more important. Many global institutions now play a significant role in promoting and supporting global economic development, trade, as well as global financial stability.

BERA - Business & Economics Research Advisor - A Quarterly Guide to Business & Economics Topics

Issue 7/8: Winter 2006/Spring 2007
Updated December 2013

International Economics & Trade

Table of Contents

Introduction
World Economic History
International Trade & Global Commerce
International Finance
Foreign Exchange Market
Trade Policy, Treaties, & Law
International Organizations & Economic Development
Country Data
Economic Trade Data & Statistics
U.S. Government Resources
Online Periodicals
Encyclopedias & Dictionaries

Caption: left:
Hanjin company container ship at port in the Port of Vancouver
Courtesy of Joseph Sams.

This issue of the Business & Economics Research Advisor is intended to serve as a comprehensive guide to international economics and trade resources. It is aimed at various types of researchers in the field of international economics and trade, ranging from scholars, area specialists, analysts, and business professionals, to students and general researchers. The sources provided were carefully selected and include only those that were determined to be authoritative sources and organizations. Classical studies in international trade theory, however, are not the focus of this particular guide.

If you have any further questions, please Ask A Librarian.

Joseph Sams, Lead
Janice Herd
Robert Jackson
Joan Sullivan
Ellen Terrell

Last updated: 12/11/2013

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   Issue 7/8, Winter 2006/Spring 2007
  The Library of Congress >> Researchers
  December 23, 2013
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