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   Issue 25, Winter 2016

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U.S. in the World Trade Organization

Negotiations

Information on the negotiation proposals that the United States has submitted to the WTO during the last round of negotiations, the Doha Round, and the U.S. participation in the various WTO committees is provided in the annual report of the U.S.Trade Representative to Congress.

Disputes

The WTO's Dispute Settlement page provides information about cases brought by the United States, and cases that United States has brought against other countries. As of June 26, 2017 the United States has brought 114 cases against other countries, and has had 130 cases brought against it.

BERA - Business & Economics Research Advisor - A Quarterly Guide to Business & Economics Topics

Issue 25: Winter 2016

Guide to Researching
U.S. Trade Policy

Table of Contents

Introduction
Primary Comprehensive Documents on U.S. Trade Policy
Selected Elements of the U.S. Trade Policy
Participants in Trade Policy Development Process
Effect of Trade Policies and Practices
     Imports
     Exports
     Production and Trade
     Selected Industry Sectors
U.S. in the World Trade Organization
Research and Advocacy
Current News Sources
Selected Periodicals and Databases
LC Online Catalog Searches

Caption (image left): WTO Public Forum 2010
Courtesy of World Trade Organization
September 16, 2010

Trade Policy Review

The United States participates in trade policy reviews (TPR) of other countries. Specific U.S. interests can be found by reviewing the summary of TPR meetings.

Trade Policy Capacity Building

U.S. Trade Representative works "closely with the U.S. Department of State, USAID, MCC [Millennium Challenge Account], U.S. Department of Agriculture, and other U.S. Government agencies to support countries in their capacity to trade" and with inter alia. the World Bank, regional development banks, the International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations to support trade policy capacity building in other nations1.


 1. Office of the U.S. Trade Representative 2015 Trade Policy Agenda and 2014 Annual Report. Viewed 09/26/2016.

Last updated: 07/27/2017

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