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December 9, 2010
The Lion of Judah: Prince Ermias Sahle Selsssie
His Royal Highness Prince Ermias Sahle Selsssie Haile Selassie discusses his work.

October 26, 2010

The History of Education in Ethiopia with Special Emphasis on Higher Education
Dr. Aklilu Habte discusses the history of higher education in Ethiopia.

October 14, 2010
African Elites in India
Author Kenneth X. Robbins discusses his book, a series of snapshots, in the form of essays by specialists in the history numismatics, architecture, and art history of South Asia.

October 10, 2010
Cape Verde & Sao Tome Principe: Commonalities & Differences of Two Lusophone Countries
The commonalities and differences of two Lusophone African countries are discussed.

September 9. 2010
Laurie Marker: The Cheetah: A Race for Survival
The African and Middle Eastern Division and the Science, Technology and Business Division co-sponsored this event featuring Laurie Marker, executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

April 13, 2010
Mulenga Kapwepwe: Zambia's Cultural Heritage
As part of a year-long celebration of its 50th anniversary, the African Section of the Library's African and Middle Eastern Division sponsors a program on Zambia's cultural heritage. The featured speaker is Mulenga Kapwepwe, policy advisor in Zambia's Ministry of Sport, Youth and Child Development, and chair of the Zambian National Arts Council.

April 7, 2010
Vanishing Pasts, Ethnographic Presents and Digital Futures: The Case of the Maasai Audiovisual Archives
This international documentary training program is discussed. This program aims to provide indigenous communities with the technical and methodological skills needed to record, maintain and preserve aspects of their traditional cultural heritage and public representations. The presentation provides an inside perspective into the aims, goals and initial results from the program. It is jointly produced by the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, the Maasai Cultural Heritage Foundation, a community-based organization of Maasai people in Laikipia, Kenya, the World Intellectual Property Organization in Switzerland and Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies.

April 6, 2010
Helen Benedict on "The Edge of Eden"
Author Helen Benedict discusses her novel of British diplomacy and clashing cultures set in 1960 on the remote Seychelle Islands in the Indian Ocean.

March 22, 2010
Tribute to Mama Afrika: Miriam Makeba
Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the African Section and Women's History Month,The African Section, of the African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress paid tribute to "Mama Afrika," Miriam Makeba, the Grammy-Award winning singer and civil rights activist, who was honored with film clips from her concerts, live performances by her fellow musicians.

March 12, 2010
Tom Shachtman: Airlift to America
Tom Shactman discusses his book "Airlift to America: How Barack Obama Sr., John F. Kennedy, Tom Mboya and 800 East African Students Changed Their World and Ours." Cora Weiss speaks from personal experience about the airlifts and activities of the African American Students Foundation, which funded, coordinated and supported the airlifts. The event is sponsored by the African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division.

January 29, 2010
China, Africa, and the African Diaspora: Perspectives
Part of a series of programs to mark the 50th anniversary of the African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division, Dr. Sharon Freeman discusses her latest book, "China, Africa, and the African Diaspora: Perspectives."

November 4, 2009
Killing Neighbors: Webs of Violence in Rwanda
Author Lee Ann Fujii addresses some of the causes of the genocide that took place in Rwanda 15 years ago, killing nearly one million people in a span of 100 days. She also talks about her book "Killing Neighbors: Webs of Violence in Rwanda."

November 2, 2009
A Conversation with Film Producer Louis Stroller
Film producer Louis Stroller talks about film, the industry and current projects involving travel to Africa and Israel.

July 27, 2009
The State of Art in Ethiopia
Renowned artist Afewerk Tekle presented a lecture on the state of art in his native Ethiopia.

April 2, 2009
UNESCO's Role in Building Bridges to Cultural Peace
Nureldin Satti, former UNESCO representative for Africa, discusses "UNESCO's Role in Building Bridges to Cultural Peace: Case Studies of Somalia, Burundi and Ethiopia" in a program sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern Division.

January 12, 2009
Waging Peace: Building a New Life in Chad after Conflict for the Victims of Darfur
Brian Wakley, chief executive of CORD, discussed "Waging Peace: Building a New Life in Chad After Conflict for the Victims of Darfur" in a program sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern Division.

December 3, 2008
Lubuto Libraries for Street Children in Africa
Across sub-Saharan Africa, where the HIV/AIDS epidemic is most severe, a growing number of orphans are heading their own households. In 12 African countries, it is projected that by 2010, 15 percent of all children under the age of 15 will be orphans.
To bring literacy and hope to Africa's vulnerable children,
Jane Kinney Meyers founded the Lubuto Library Project. Meyers discussed the goals and accomplishments of the project at the Library.


November 3, 2008
Chinua Achebe: 50th Anniversary of "Things Fall Apart" (Morning)
Through his fiction and non-fiction works, Nigerian author Chinua Achebe has sought to repair the damage done to the continent of Africa and its people as a result of European colonization. This is best exemplified in his most famous novel "Things Fall Apart," one of the first African novels written in English to achieve national acclaim. To mark this milestone, the Library's African Section hosted a day-long program titled "Fifty Years of Chinua Achebe's Celebrated Novel 'Things Fall Apart.'"

November 3, 2008
Chinua Achebe: 50th Anniversary of "Things Fall Apart" (Afternoon)
Through his fiction and non-fiction works, Nigerian author Chinua Achebe has sought to repair the damage done to the continent of Africa and its people as a result of European colonization. This is best exemplified in his most famous novel "Things Fall Apart," one of the first African novels written in English to achieve national acclaim. To mark this milestone, the Library's African Section hosted a day-long program titled "Fifty Years of Chinua Achebe's Celebrated Novel 'Things Fall Apart.'"

November 3, 2008

An Evening with Chinua Achebe
Through his fiction and non-fiction works, Nigerian author Chinua Achebe has sought to repair the damage done to the continent of Africa and its people as a result of European colonization. This is best exemplified in his most famous novel "Things Fall Apart," one of the first African novels written in English to achieve national acclaim. Set in the 1890s, the novel deals with the impact of British colonialism on the traditional Igbo society in Nigeria. Published in 1958 -- just two years before the end of a century of British rule in Nigeria -- the novel celebrated its 50th anniversary of publication in 2008. "An Evening with Chinua Achebe" featured the author reading from his celebrated work.

October 10, 2008
The African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division and the Nigeria Peoples Forum-USA jointly hosted the Ninth Annual State of the Nigerian Nation Symposium -- Developing Nigeria's Power Sector: Strategies, Challenges and Impact.
Morning Session
Afternoon Session

October 7, 2008
In Search of Africa at the Library of Congress: Collecting and Preserving African Heritage
The African Section of the African & Middle Eastern Division and The Prints & Photographs Division at the Library of Congress co-sponsor an illustrated lecture given by Sylivester Sennabulya

September 27, 2008

Immaculee Ilibagiza: 2008 National Book Festival
Immaculee Ilibagiza was born in Rwanda and studied electronic and mechanical engineering at the National University. She lost most of her family during the 1994 genocide. Four years later, she emigrated to the United States and began working at the United Nations in New York City. She is now a full-time public speaker and writer. In 2007 she established the Left to Tell Charitable Fund, which helps support Rwandan orphans. She holds honorary doctoral degrees from the University of Notre Dame and St. John's University and has received a Christopher Award and the Mahatma Gandhi International Award for Reconciliation and Peace (2007), among other honors. Her books include "Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust" (2006 ) and "Led by Faith: Rising from the Ashes of the Rwandan Genocide" (2008) -- both from Hay House.

February 4, 2008
Reflections from South Africa: Libraries and Society Change
Ellen R. Tise, president-elect (2007-2009) of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), gave an informative presentation on the transformation of libraries and the library profession in South Africa titled "Reflections from South Africa: Libraries and Societal Change." The lunchtime program opened up the Library of Congress' African American History Month celebration.

November 15, 2007

Somali Food Traditions at Thanksgiving
Barlin Ali, author of "Somali Cuisine," presented a lecture on "Somali Food Traditions at Thanksgiving" in a program sponsored by the Library's African and Middle Eastern Division and the Library of Congress Cooking Club.

July 24, 2007
Liberian-U.S. Relations Symposium: Session I
Liberian-U.S. Relations Symposium: Session II
In celebration of the 160th Independence Anniversary of the Republic of Liberia, the African and Middle Eastern Division and the Embassy of Liberia co-sponsored a symposium with the theme "Liberian-United States Relations: Past, Present and Future." Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr., made a special presentation. Other speakers included His Excellency Charles A. Minor, Liberian Ambassador to the United States; Wilton Gbakolo Sengbe Sankawulo, Sr., novelist and former Chairman of the Second Liberian National Transition Government; former Sec. of Transportation Rodney Slater; Ambassador Alice M. Dear, president of A.M. Dear and Associates; David Smith, Jr., Georgia State University College of Law; and Angel D. Batiste, Library of Congress. C. Patrick Burrowes, former ELTV Action News anchor and attorney Kwame A. Clements, host and managing editor of "The African World," served as moderators of the symposium.

February 26, 2007
Life Stories and Memory Making in South Africa
Nokuthula Mazibuko presents "Life Stories and Memory Making in South Africa" in a program sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern Division and the Embassy of South Africa. During her presentation, Mazibuko shows a segment from her documentary film, "The Spirit of No Surrender," which looks back on the 1976 youth uprisings in South Africa, focusing on the role that teachers played in firing the minds of students. She reads from her book, "Spring Offensive," a biography of two friends in Umkhonto We Sizwe, the MK Underground. Mazibuko stresses the importance of biographies and the continued need for narratives about the struggle for freedom and about the lives of ordinary South Africans.

November 7, 2006

Tour of Leopold Sedar Senghor Exhibit
in African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room

SPEAKER: Stephen Grant
The Library's African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room presents a special display of Senghor memorabilia featuring signed copies of Leopold Senghor's prolific works from the private collection of Stephen H. Grant, a retired administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development.

November 7, 2006
Leopold Sedar Senghor: Thinker, Statesman, Poet Souleymane Bachir Diagne, professor of philosophy and religion at Northwestern University, gave a lecture titled "Leopold Sedar Senghor: Thinker, Statesman and Poet" in a program sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern Division.

2006 was the centennial year of the birth of Senghor (1906-2001), who served as Senegal's first president from 1960 to 1980. During his presidency, he set Senegal on the path toward a multi-party democracy. Senghor is also regarded as one of the greatest French-language poets of the 20th century. Fatou Fall, a distant relative of Senghor, read one of his poems at the event.
Speaker Biography: Before joining the faculty of Northwestern University, Souleymane Bachir Diagne taught philosophy at Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal, for more than 20 years. An alumnus of Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, Diagne obtained his Ph.D. in philosophy at the Sorbonne in 1988. His field of research includes history of algebraic logic, history of philosophy, Islamic philosophy and African philosophy. The author of many publications, Diagne is currently working on a book about Senghor's philosophy.

September 7, 2005
A Modern Queen in a Traditional Role
SPEAKER: Nnabagereka Sylvia Nagginda
H.R.H. Queen of Buganda Nnabagereka Sylvia Nagginda presented "A Modern Queen in a Traditional Role" in a program sponsored by the African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division. Nagginda described her work as a traditional ruler and the work of the charitable foundation she established, the Nnabagereka Development Trust.



Examples of Reconciliation: Africa’s Contributions to the Global Community

Monday, March 21, 2005
During the last century in Africa, millions of non-combatants—women, children, the elderly, the disabled, and the poor--were killed, displaced, and/or forced to flee to neighboring countries as a result of conflict and other manmade crises. According to the Institute for Development Studies, during the last two decades of the last century, 28 sub-Saharan African counties were engaged in violent conflict. For example, in Rwanda, approximately 800,000 people died as a result of genocide in 1994; and an estimated 4.7 million died the nineties in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The seminar provided an opportunity for former President Ketumile Masire of Botswana and former President Pierre Buyoya of Burundi, religious leaders from Africa and the United States, scholars, diplomats and development experts to come together and share the lessons that they have learned regarding indigenous reconciliation processes in Africa. This seminar was co-sponsored by the African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division and the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress with the cooperation of the Africa Society of the National Summit on Africa, Boston University’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center, Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies, the Nigerian Peoples Forum, and the U.S. Institute of Peace.


Forest Peoples and Indigenous Knowledge: Keys to Preserving Africa's Threatened Wildlife Speakers: Alden Almquist, anthropologist, 2003-2004 Kluge Staff Fellow
Albert Lokasola, President, Vie Sauvage, Democratic Republic of the Congo

There is a growing movement toward engaging local people and their knowledge in the cause of wildlife conservation. Dr. Almquist illustrates this trend with a report on his work in information exchange and building community capacity in Congo's Lac Tumba landscape during the summer months of 2004. Mr. Lokasola speaks on his local Congolese wildlife NGO's work in bonobo conservation in the nearby Maringa-Lopori-Wamba landscape; he also shares impressions from the first UN Forest Forum conference on Forest Peoples and Indigenous Knowledge which he attended from December 6-10, 2004 in San Jose, Costa Rica.Sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern Division and the Science, Technology and Business Division of the Library of Congress, Washington, DC., December 13, 2004
Contemporary Lusophone African Literatures and Cultures: A Colloquium on Cape Verde and Mozambique
.
Friday, February 6, 2004.
Hosted by the African and Middle Eastern Division, the Hispanic Division, the John W. Kluge Center of the
The Library of Congress; Organized by the Center for Portuguese Studies and Culture, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth; Sponsored by te Luso-American Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, and the Embassy of the Republic of Cape Verde. Details of the Colloquium
Dr. Lilly Golden presented "Africans in Russia: an Historical Perspective" on Nov. 14, 2003. Dr. Golden, a Russian citizen, was born in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, in the former Soviet Union to an African-American father and a Polish, Jewish-American mother. Her father, who had studied in Tuskegee under Dr. George Washington Carver, first visited the USSR in 1924, and then returned in 1934, along with 16 other African-American agriculturalists to work on the development of the cotton industry in Uzbekstan. In her presentation, Dr. Golden discussed early Africans in Europe, and contemporary race relations in Russia for people of African descent. This program was sponsored by the African and Middle Eastern and European Divisions of Area Studies, at the Library of Congress.
The Ancient Manuscripts from the Desert Libraries of Timbuktu
September 03, 2003
Cheikh Abdel Kader Haidara, Curator, Mamma Haidara Memorial Library of Timbuktu in the Republic of Mali,
discusses the efforts to maintain the desert libraries of manuscripts from as far back as the fourteenth century, an important cultural legacy of the environs of the Sahara desert in West Africa. Cheikh Haidara is considered to be one of the leading scholars and a librarian in the Timbuktu region.
Dr. Hashim El-Tinay, Founder / President, Salam Sudan Foundation translates from Arabic to English simultaneously the words of Cheikh Haidara.
This program was arranged by the African Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division
and Kluge Center.

As Marimbas de Angola concert featuring Jorge MacedoDr. Jorge Macedo, writer, journalist and ethno-musicologist, contributes to the 27th anniversary celebration of the independence of the Republic of Angola with a lecture and music. Matias Sacotingo serves as his interpreter. A speech by Her Excellency Josefina Pitra Diakité, Ambassador from Angola opens the event. Sponsored by The Embassy of Angola and the African Section, African and Middle Eastern Division of the Library of Congress, Washington D.C. November 14, 2002
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