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(Mar 27, 2012) Some political factions have demanded that the ruling Islamic party in Tunisia, al Nahdah, should insert a provision in the country's penal code criminalizing the act of normalization of relations with Israel. These organizations also asked the Constituent Assembly to introduce a provision in the new constitution banning any transactions with the state of Israel. (Criminalizing the Act of Normalization with Israel Splits the Tunisian Political Arena [in Arabic], Al Byan (Mar. 22, 2012).)

A representative of the Communist Labor Party declared that the party will work in conjunction with the Islamic groups in the Constituent Assembly to introduce the principle of boycotting the state of Israel in the new constitution. In addition, following the example of a Lebanese law, the Lebanese Boycott Law of 1955 (Law of June 23, 1955 [in Arabic] ( unofficial source)), the party requested that members of the Tunisian Constituent Assembly enact legislation imposing sanctions against individuals and companies dealing with the state of Israel. (Criminalizing the Act of Normalization with Israel Splits the Tunisian Political Arena, supra.)

The Foreign Minister opposed the demands of these political groups. He announced that there is no link between criminalizing the normalization of relations with Israel and drafting a new constitution that reflects the general principles of the state's policies. (Id.)

Author: George Sadek More by this author
Topic: Crime and law enforcement More on this topic
Jurisdiction: Tunisia More about this jurisdiction

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Last updated: 03/27/2012