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(Nov 06, 2012) On October 17, 2012, a number of Libyan judges announced their objection to a bill on the reorganization of the judiciary, which had been previously referred to the Libyan National Assembly (Parliament) by the Supreme Council of the Judiciary. The judges opposing the bill attempted to meet with the Speaker of the National Assembly to convince him not to endorse the bill.

The bill focuses on internal changes to the judicial branch. Article 5 of the bill would exclude from the judiciary all those judges who had cooperated with the regime of the fallen leader Muammar Gaddafi. The bill would also bar judges who had imposed unfair punishments against individuals who had opposed the former regime. In addition, it would ban individuals who had previously served as judges on the People's Court from serving as judges. The purpose of the People's Court was to try opponents of Gaddafi. (Judges and Legal Counselors from Benghazi Attempt to Repeal a Bill to Reorganize the Judiciary in Libya [in Arabic], LIBYA AL YOM (Oct. 17, 2012).)

Author: George Sadek More by this author
Topic: Judges More on this topic
Jurisdiction: Libya More about this jurisdiction

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Last updated: 11/06/2012