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Summary

In 1999, after the approval of a national strategy to combat drugs and drug addiction, the Portuguese government issued Law No. 30/2000, which decriminalized the acquisition, possession, and use of specified plants, substances, or preparations for a person’s own consumption, and turned such conduct into misdemeanors.  Law No. 30/2000 created a Commission for Drug Dissuasion for the processing of these misdemeanors and the application of sanctions, which is regulated by Decree-Law No. 130-A/2001.  To further implement the strategy, the government in 2001 enacted Decree-Law No. 183, which approved a general system of prevention policies, risk reduction, and minimization of harm that created programs and public health structures for increasing awareness and providing for the referral of drug addicts for treatment.

I.  Introduction

In the late 1990s, drug addiction was a major concern in Portugal.[1]  To address the situation, on February 16, 1998, the government issued an order creating the Commission for the National Strategy for Drug Control (Comissão para a Estratégia Nacional de Combate à Droga), which was charged with proposing a national strategy to combat drugs.  That strategy contains the basic guidelines of the policy on drugs and drug addiction in various fields, including primary prevention, treatment, social rehabilitation, training and research, risk reduction, and combatting drug trafficking.[2]

Based on a report prepared by the Commission, on April 22, 1999, the government approved the first National Strategy for the Fight Against Drugs and Drug Addiction (Estratégia Nacional de Luta Contra a Droga e a Toxicodependência) for the period 1999–2004.[3]  The Strategy recommended decriminalization of drug use and the reclassification of drug use, possession, and purchase as administrative offenses (ilícitos de mera ordenação social).[4]  The Strategy noted that maintaining criminal sanctions was justified with regard to the cultivation of drugs for consumption, because cultivation dangerously aligns with trafficking.[5]

To implement the National Strategy, the government enacted Law No. 30 of November 29, 2000; Decree-Law No. 130-A of April 23, 2001; and Decree-Law No. 183 of June 21, 2001 (all discussed below).

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II.  Law No. 30 of November 29, 2000

The National Strategy led to the approval of Law No. 30 of November 29, 2000, which defines the legal regime applicable to the use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances, and the health and social protection of people who consume such substances without a prescription.[6]  The plants, substances, and preparations subject to this legal regime are listed in tables I through IV of Decree-Law No. 15 of January, 22, 1993.[7]  Law No. 30 also revoked article 40 (on the criminalization of drug use) and article 41 (regulating the voluntary treatment of drug users) of Decree-Law No. 15/93.[8]

A.  Use of Listed Substances

According to article 2(1) of Law No. 30/2000, the use, acquisition, and possession of plants, substances, or preparations listed in the abovementioned tables for a person’s own consumption constitute misdemeanors (contra-ordenaçãos).[9]  However, the acquisition and possession of these substances must not exceed the amount required for average personal use during a ten-day period.[10] 

B.  Jurisdiction for Processing and Execution

The processing of misdemeanors and the application of sanctions rest with the Commission for Drug Dissuasion (Comissão para a Dissuasão de Toxicodependência), which was specially created for this purpose and functions within dependent services facilities of the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction (Instituto da Droga e Toxicodependência) in each district.[11]  The administration of fines and alternative sanctions is the responsibility of the police.[12]

C.  Apprehension and Identification

The police authorities must identify a user and eventually perform the search and seizure of plants, substances, or preparations referred to in article 1 of Law No. 30/2000 that are found in the possession of the user, which are forfeited to the state.  The police must then prepare a report that is sent to the Commission with territorial jurisdiction.[13]

Where it is not possible to identify the user at the place and time of the occurrence, the police may, if necessary, detain the user to ensure his appearance before the Commission, subject to legal conditions governing detention for identification.[14]

D.  Nature and Circumstances of Use

The Commission hears the drug user and gathers the other information (elementos) necessary to make a decision on whether the user is a drug addict, what substances were used, the circumstances and place of use, and the economic situation of the user.[15]  The drug user can request the participation of a therapist, subject to regulation by the Commission.[16] 

In making this decision, the Commission or the drug user may propose or request appropriate medical examinations, including but not limited to blood or urine tests.[17]  If the Commission’s determination was not based on such medical exams, the drug user may request them, and the results must be analyzed in a manner that enables the Commission to reassess its initial conclusion.[18]

The examination must be carried out by a properly authorized health service, or by a private service selected by the drug user, within thirty days.[19]

E.  Treatment

If a drug user agrees to undergo treatment, the Commission communicates with the public or private health service chosen by the user, who must be informed of available alternatives.[20]  The user is responsible for the costs of treatment provided by a private health service.[21]

The health service must inform the Commission every three months on whether to continue with the treatment.[22]

F.  Provisional Suspension of Commission Proceedings

The Commission must provisionally suspend proceedings whenever a drug user without prior registration of misdemeanor proceedings under Law No. 30/2000 is considered a nonaddicted user,[23] whenever a drug user without registration of a prior misdemeanor proceeding under Law No. 30/2000 accepts to undergo treatment,[24] or if a drug user with a prior registration of misdemeanor proceedings under Law No. 30/2000 agrees to undergo treatment.[25] The decision to provisionally suspend proceedings is not appealable.[26]

G.  Duration of Suspension

The proceedings may be suspended for up to two years and may be extended for another year by reasoned decision of the Commission.[27]  The Commission must close and cannot reopen a case if a nonaddicted drug user has not relapsed or if an addicted user submits to treatment and does not improperly stop it.[28]  The statute of limitations period does not run during the suspension of proceedings.[29]

H.  Suspension of Sanction

The Commission may suspend the determination of the sanction if the drug user agrees to undergo voluntarily treatment.[30]  The suspension period may last for up to three years.[31]  If during the period of suspension the drug user stops treatment for reasons attributable to him or her, the suspension is revoked and the appropriate sanction for the underlying offense is determined.[32]  The Commission declares the process closed if, after the suspension period, there is no reason that could lead to its revocation.[33]

I.  Sanctions

1.  Under Law No. 30

Nonaddicted drug users may be fined or, alternatively, subjected to a nonpecuniary sanction.[34]  Nonpecuniary sanctions are also applicable to addicted users.[35] Pursuant to article 15(2), the Commission determines the penalty according to the need to prevent the use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances.[36]  In the application of sanctions, the Commission takes into account the situation of the drug user and the nature and circumstances of drug use, considering, in particular,

a) the gravity of the act;

b) the agent’s fault;

c) the type of plants, substances, or preparations consumed;

d) the public or private nature of consumption;

e) in the case of public consumption, the place of consumption;

f) in the event of a non-addicted user, the occasional or habitual nature of consumption;

g)  the personal situation of the drug user, particularly his economic and financial situation.[37]

Instead of a fine, the Commission may impose a reprimand (admoestação) as an alternative.[38]

According to article 17(2) of Law No. 30/2000, without prejudice to the provision of article 15(2) of Law No. 30/2000, the Commission may impose the following sanctions as an alternative to a fine, or as the primary sanction:

a) prohibition on exercising a profession or activity, in particular those subject to a licensing regime, [that could] thereby result in risk to the safety of self or others;

b) prohibition on frequenting certain places;

c) prohibition on accompanying, lodging, or receiving certain persons;

d) prohibition on the absence of an alien without authorization;

e) periodic presentation in a place to be indicated by the commission;

f) suspension [or] prohibition on the concession and renewal of a license to use and carry a weapon of defense, hunting, or recreation;

g) seizure of items belonging to the drug user that pose a risk to the drug user or the community, or promote the commission of a crime or other offense; [or]

h) deprivation of grant management or a benefit awarded on a personal basis by public bodies or services, which will be entrusted to the entity that conducts the process or that accompanies the treatment process, when accepted.[39]

As an alternative to the abovementioned sanctions, the Commission may, provided that the drug user agrees, order him or her to provide compensation or public service to a public or private charitable institution, in accordance with the regime established in paragraphs 3 and 4 of article 58 of the Penal Code.[40]  The Commission may suspend the execution of any of the mentioned sanctions, substituting them for the fulfillment of certain obligations under the terms of article 19 of Law No. 30/2000 (discussed below).

2.  Under the Penal Code

Article 58(1) of the Penal Code determines that if a punishment not exceeding two years is to be applied, the court may replace it with a community service requirement if doing so is deemed an adequate and sufficient form of punishment.[41]  The Penal Code defines “community service” as the provision of free services to the state, other public legal entities, or private organizations whose purposes the court considers of interest to the community.[42] 

For the purposes of calculating the length of community service, each prison day established by the sentence is to be replaced by an hour of work, to a maximum of 480 hours.[43]  Community service can be performed on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, as well as on weekdays, but may not affect normal working hours or exceed, per day, the overtime limits set by law.[44]

J.  Fines

The range of potential fines differs depending on the table of Decree-Law No. 15 of January 22, 1993, the substances or preparations are listed on.[45]

Sixty percent of the proceeds of fines are distributed to the state and 40% to Intervention Service in Addictive Behaviors and Dependencies (Serviço de Intervenção nos Comportamentos Aditivos e nas Dependências, SICAD), formerly the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction.[46]

K.  Reprimand

The Commission may simply give a reprimand if, taking into account the personal conditions of the drug user; the type of consumption; and the type of plants, substances, or preparations consumed, it believes that the user will refrain from use in the future.[47]  A reprimand is an oral censorship, and the user must expressly be alerted to the consequences of his or her behavior and asked to refrain from further drug use.[48]  The Commission must give the reprimand when the decision to apply the sanction is final,[49] and must deliver the reprimand immediately if the user renounces the right to appeal.[50]

L.  Suspension of the Enforcement of the Sanction

In the case of an addicted drug user who refuses treatment or cannot be treated, the Commission may suspend enforcement of sanctions and require him or her to periodically appear before the health services.  This suspension of the enforcement of sanctions may be subject to acceptance by the user of the measures provided for in article 19(3),[51] which provides that the Commission may propose other monitoring solutions advisable in specific cases.

In the case of a nonaddicted drug user, the Commission may opt for suspension of the sentence if, taking into account the personal conditions of the drug user; the type of consumption; and the type of plants, substances, or consumed preparations involved, it concludes that the purpose of preventing consumption is better served by this approach and the drug user accepts the conditions offered by the Commission under article 19(3) of Law No. 30/2000.[52]

Article 19(3) of Law No 30/2000 determines that the Commission may propose other monitoring solutions advisable for the circumstances of each case, in order to guarantee respect for the dignity of the individual and his or her acceptance of the measures set out in article 17(2)(a–d) of Law No. 30/2000.[53]

M.  Duration of Suspended Enforcement of Sanctions

The suspension period for the enforcement of sanctions is set between one and three years after the final and nonappealable decision of the Commission, not counting the time the drug user is deprived of liberty by virtue of a coercive measure, criminal sentence, or security measure.[54]  The Commission determines the duration of the measures provided for in article 19(3) of Law No. 30/2000, which cannot exceed the maximum limit of six months.[55]

N.  Regular Presentation

Where enforcement of sanctions is suspended subject to the user’s periodic appearance before the health services, the Commission makes the necessary communications to the health center of the user’s home area or to another agreed upon health service.[56]  The health center must inform the Commission on the regularity of appearances or noncompliance and the reasons for the noncompliance, if known.[57]

O.  Communication of Measures

The decision to order the suspension of enforcement of sanctions must be communicated to those services and authorities whose cooperation with the enforcement measures was requested.[58]  The services and authorities must communicate noncompliance to the Commission for the purposes of article 23(2) and (3) of Law No. 30/2000.[59]

P.  Effects of the Suspension

The Commission declares the termination of the sanction if, after the suspension period, there is no reason that could lead to the revocation of the suspension decision.[60] Article 23(2) of Law No. 30/2000 determines that the suspension of a sanction is revoked whenever the drug user repeatedly breaches the imposed measures.[61]  Article 23(3) establishes that the revocation of a suspension determines compliance with the applicable sanction.[62]

Q.  Duration of the Sanctions

The sanctions provided for in article 17(2) of Law No. 30/2000 and the accompanying measures provided for in article 19 must have a minimum duration of one month and a maximum duration of three years.[63]

R.  Fulfilment of the Sanctions and Accompanying Measures

The decision to impose sanctions or accompanying measures is reported to the police, and the police must inform the agencies (serviços) and authorities whose cooperation is needed for implementation of these measures.[64]

S.  Subsidiary Law

In the absence of a specific provision of Law No. 30/2000, the general regime of administrative offenses must be applied.[65]

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III.  Decree-Law No. 130-A of April 23, 2001

According to the terms of Law No. 30/2000, the processing of the drug-related misdemeanors and the application of sanctions are the responsibility of the Commission for Drug Dissuasion.[66]  On April 23, 2001, the government enacted Decree-Law No. 130-A to establish the organization, the process for the dissuasion of the drug user, and the Commission’s operating system for the dissuasion of drug abuse and to regulate other supplementary matters.[67]

A.  Territorial Jurisdiction

Offices of the Commission for Drug Dissuasion must be established in each district capital of the mainland within facilities made available by the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction (now, SICAD).[68]  The Commission in the consumer’s home area has territorial jurisdiction, unless the home area is not known, in which case the Commission in the area where the drug user was found has jurisdiction.[69]

B.  Knowledge of the Offense

A police officer who becomes aware of an offense as provided for in Law No. 30/2000 must prepare a report describing

a) the facts that constitute the offense;

b) the date, time, place and circumstances in which the offense was committed;

c) all information available about the identification of the offender and his domicile;

d) the steps taken as well as the known evidence, including witnesses who can testify about the facts.[70]

The report is signed by the entity that prepared it and sent to the Commission with territorial jurisdiction by the fastest way possible, so that it is received by the Commission within thirty-six hours after the occurrence.[71]  To prevent the disappearance of evidence, the police authorities confiscate the substances listed in the report and ship them within the shortest period of time to the Commission, to be deposited in the district’s command.[72] 

When it is not possible to identify the offender and the offender’s place of residence at the time the offense occurs, the police may arrest the offender to enable his/her identification or to ensure his/her appearance before the Commission under the legal regime of detention for identification.[73]  In this case, the offender may contact a family member or attorney by telephone.[74]

C.  Preliminary Measures

When the offender reveals signs of physical or psychological decompensation, if the offender agrees or if the person’s safety is in danger, the police authorities may take him or her to a public health service so that the necessary care can be provided; alternatively the police may, if possible, communicate to the Commission with territorial jurisdiction to allow it to adopt appropriate procedures.[75]   Under these circumstances, the police must immediately send to the chairman of the Commission with territorial jurisdiction a report identifying the person, the date, and the reasons for the presentation.[76]

Once the report has been prepared, the drug user must be immediately notified by the police authority to appear before the Commission with territorial jurisdiction, which must occur in the shortest time possible, not to exceed seventy-two hours after the occurrence.[77]

When the offender discloses any disability, the police authorities must contact the person’s legal representative in the shortest time possible in order to inform that person of the offense and provide notice to appear before the Commission.[78]  The offender or his or her representative must be informed that they can hire an attorney, or require that an attorney be appointed.[79]

Decree-Law No. 130-A/2001 further details the composition (art. 3) and functions of the commission (arts. 4¥8); police procedures and hearings (arts. 12¥16); and several other procedures related to the processing of the offenses and the application of sanctions.

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IV.  Decree-Law No. 183 of June 21, 2001

Decree-Law No. 183 of June 21, 2001, approved the general system of prevention policies, which are aimed at the reduction of risk and the minimization of harm.[80] 

A.  Purpose

According to article 1, Decree-Law No. 183/2001 is intended to create programs and public health structures for the awareness and referral for treatment of drug addicts, prevent and reduce risky attitudes and behaviors, and minimize the individual and social harm caused by drug abuse.[81]

B.  Duty of the State

For the protection of public health and the health of drug users, and in compliance with international obligations, the state bears the duty to make accessible to all drug users with risky attitudes and behaviors the abovementioned programs and structures, prioritized according to the specifics of each case.[82]

Whenever possible, partnerships with other public or private entities are encouraged.[83]  To the extent possible, programs and structures must focus on referral for treatment and the cessation of drug use.[84]

For these purposes, the following programs and structures are regulated by this Decree-Law:

a) supporting offices for drug addicts;

b) reception centers;

c) shelter centers;

d) points of contact and information;

e) mobile spaces for the prevention of infectious diseases;

f) replacement programs;

g) needle-exchange programs;

h) street teams; [and]

i) programs for supervised use.[85]

1.  Support Offices for Drug Addicts

The support offices for drug addicts (gabinetes de apoio a toxicodependentes sem enquadramento sócio-familiar) are places for screening, support, and referral for treatment.[86]  The support offices are intended to contribute to the diagnosis and improvement of social and health conditions of marginalized and excluded drug users, and their referral for treatment.[87] 

2.  Reception Centers

Reception centers (centros de acolhimento) are temporary residential spaces.[88]  They are designed to provide environments less conducive to drug use and to provide social and therapeutic treatment of excluded drug users.[89] 

3.  Shelter Centers

Shelter centers (centros de abrigo) are spaces for overnight stays.[90]  The shelters aim to help improve sleeping conditions for drug users without social and family support, bring them closer to social systems, minimize the conditions that favor drug use, and provide for users’ referral to treatment.[91] 

4.  Points of Contact and Information

Points of contact and information are spaces designed to prevent or reduce drug use and its risks.[92]  These spaces are also used to educate the population about the risks and effects of drug addiction, and other issues that may contribute to the prevention of consumption.[93] 

5.  Mobile Spaces for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases

Mobile spaces for the prevention of infectious diseases are spaces for

a) the tracking and treatment of the most common infectious diseases in drug users;

b) the vaccination of the population at risk;

c) the reduction of injecting and/or smoking heroin on the street through the substitution of methadone, which must be dispensed in facilities assigned to projects in accordance with the law.[94]

6.  Low-Demand Replacement Programs

Low-demand replacement programs (programas de substituição em baixo limiar de exigência) have the following objectives:

a) reduction in heroin use, by replacing it with methadone, to be dispensed through programs with great accessibility, without requiring immediate abstinence and in adequate facilities for this purpose;

b) increase in the regularity of contacts of drug users with professionals from a public health team that can particularly help with the person’s future abstinence.[95]

7.  Needle Exchange Programs

The purpose of needle exchange programs is to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases intravenously.[96]  The programs are designed to promote accessibility to the exchange of syringes and needles, filters, wipes, distilled water, citric acid, and other suitable materials.[97]

8.  Street Teams

Street teams (equipas de rua) are designed to promote the reduction of risks, by intervening in public spaces where drug use is experienced as a social problem.[98] 

9.  Programs for Supervised Use

The objective of the programs for supervised use (programas para consumo vigiado) are to increase infection-free intravenous use and the consequent reduction of risks associated with this form of use, and to get closer to drug users in their socio-cultural context, with a view to building their awareness and referring them to treatment, through the creation of sites for this type of use.[99] 

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Prepared by Eduardo Soares
Senior Foreign Law Specialist
July 2016


[1] Política Portuguesa, SICAD, http://www.sicad.pt/PT/PoliticaPortuguesa/SitePages/Home%20Page.aspx (last visited June 16, 2016), archived at https://perma.cc/Y8F6-8M68.

[2] Despacho 3229/98 (2a. Série), Diário da República No. 45/1998, Série II, de 23 de Fevereiro de 1998, https://dre.pt/web/guest/analisejuridica/-/aj/publicDetails/maximized?p_auth=MguOwVr4&p_p_auth=YyURA 4xc&diplomaId=3319678&mode=pdt, archived at https://perma.cc/Z5XP-YSGN

[3] Resolução do Conselho de Ministros No. 46/99, Diário da República No. 122, Série I-B, de 26 de Maio de 1999, http://www.sicad.pt/BK/Publicacoes/Lists/SICAD_PUBLICACOES/Attachments/71/ENresolucao.pdf, archived at https://perma.cc/8T3N-MCU7; see alsoSICAD, supra note 1.

[4] Resolução do Conselho de Ministros No. 46, Item 26.

[5] Id.

[6] Lei No. 30/2000, de 29 de Novembro, as amended by Decreto-Lei No. 114/2011, de 30 de Novembro, art. 1(1), http://www.pgdlisboa.pt/leis/lei_mostra_articulado.php?nid=186&tabela=leis&so_miolo, archived at https://perma.cc/S4VS-4LQR

[7] Id. art. 1(2). 

[8] Id. art. 28.  Decree-Law No. 15 of January 22, 1993 defines the legal framework applicable to the trafficking and consumption of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances.  Decreto-Lei No. 15/93, de 22 de Janeiro, as amended by Lei No. 77/2014, de 11 de Novemebro, art. 1, http://www.pgdlisboa.pt/leis/lei_mostra_articulado.php? nid=181&tabela=leis, archived at https://perma.cc/E2W2-F5XH.  

[9] Id. art. 2(1).  Decree-Law No. 433, of October 27, 1982, as amended by Law No. 109 of December 24, 2001, defines contra-ordenação as all illegal and objectionable (censurável) facts that fit into a legal category subject to a fine.  Decreto-Lei No. 433/82, de 27 de Outubro, as amended byLei No. 109/2001, de 24 de Dezembro, art. 1, http://www.pgdlisboa.pt/leis/lei_mostra_articulado.php?nid=166&tabela=leis, archived at https://perma.cc/7S23-PEW9

[10] Lei No. 30/2000, art. 2(2).

[11] Id. art. 5(1).  On January 26, 2012, Decree-Law No. 17/2012 replaced the Institute for Drugs and Drug Addiction with the Intervention Service in Addictive Behaviors and Dependencies (Serviço de Intervenção nos Comportamentos Aditivos e nas Dependências, SICAD).  Decreto-Lei No. 17/2012, de 26 de Janeiro, art. 10, http://www.sicad.pt/BK/Institucional/Legislacao/Lists/SICAD_LEGISLACAO/Attachments/818/Decreto-Lei_17_2012.pdf, archived at https://perma.cc/HL79-QKLU.

[12] Lei No. 30/2000, art. 5(2).

[13] Id. art. 4(1).  Article 8(1) of Law No. 30 determines that the Commission has territorial jurisdiction over the user’s home area, unless this is unknown, in which case the Commission where the user was found has jurisdiction.

[14] Id. art. 4(2).

[15] Id. art. 10(1). 

[16] Id. art. 10(2). 

[17] Id. art. 10(3). 

[18] Id. art. 10(4). 

[19] Id. art. 10(5). 

[20] Id. art. 12(1). 

[21] Id. art. 12(2). 

[22] Id. art. 12(3). 

[23] Id. art. 11(1). 

[24] Id. art. 11(2). 

[25] Id. art. 11(3). 

[26] Id. art. 11(4). 

[27] Id. art. 13(1). 

[28] Id. art. 13(2). 

[29] Id. art. 13(4). 

[30] Id. art. 14(1). 

[31] Id. art. 14(2). 

[32] Id. art. 14(3). 

[33] Id. art. 14(4). 

[34] Id. art. 15(1). 

[35] Id. art. 15(2). 

[36] Id. art. 15(3). 

[37] Id. art. 15(4). 

[38] Id. art. 17(1). 

[39] Id. art. 17(2) (translation by author). 

[40] Id. art. 17(3). 

[41] Código Penal, Decreto-Lei No. 48/95, de 15 de Março, as amended by Lei No. 110/2015, de 26 de Agosto, art. 58(1), http://www.pgdlisboa.pt/leis/lei_mostra_articulado.php?nid=109&tabela=leis&ficha=1&pagina=1&so_miolo, archived at https://perma.cc/ZLS8-ANF4.    

[42] Id. art. 58(2).

[43] Id. art. 58(3).

[44] Id. art. 58(4).

[45] Lei No. 30/2000, arts. 16(1), 16(2). 

[46] Id. art. 16(3). 

[47] Id. art. 18(1). 

[48] Id. art. 18(2). 

[49] Id. art. 18(3). 

[50] Id. art. 18(4). 

[51] Id. art. 19(1).  The regime of periodic presentation is determined by an order (portaria) issued by the Minister of Health.  Id. art. 19(4).

[52] Id. art. 19(2). 

[53] Id. art. 19(3).

[54] Id. art. 20(1). 

[55] Id. art. 20(2). 

[56] Id. art. 21(1). 

[57] Id. art. 21(2). 

[58] Id. art. 22(1). 

[59] Id. art. 22(2). 

[60] Id. art. 23(1). 

[61] Id. art. 23(2). 

[62] Id. art. 23(3). 

[63] Id. art. 24.

[64] Id. art. 25.

[65] Id. art. 26 (indirectly referencing Decree-Law No. 433, of October 27, 1982, as amended by Law No. 109 of December 24, 2001).

[66] Id. art. 5(1).

[67] Decreto-Lei No. 130-A/2001, de 23 de Abril, as amended by Decreto-Lei No. 114/2011, de 30 de Novembro, art. 1, http://www.pgdlisboa.pt/leis/lei_mostra_articulado.php?nid=193&tabela=leis, archived at https://perma.cc/ 6DMM-RP3X.   

[68] Id. art. 2(1).

[69] Id. art. 2(2).

[70] Id. art. 9(1) (translation by author).

[71] Id. art. 9(2).

[72] Id. art. 9(3).

[73] Id. art. 9(4).

[74] Id. art. 9(5).

[75] Id. art. 10(1).

[76] Id. art. 10(2).

[77] Id. art. 11(1).

[78] Id. art. 11(2).

[79] Id. art. 11(3).

[81] Id. art. 1.

[82] Id. art. 2(1).

[83] Id. art. 2(2).

[84] Id. art. 2(3).

[85] Id. art. 3 (translation by author).

[86] Id. art. 6(1).

[87] Id. art. 6(2).  The management and functioning of the supporting offices are regulated by articles 7–13 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[88] Id. art. 14(1).

[89] Id. art. 14(2).  The management and functioning of reception centers are regulated by articles 15–20 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[90] Id. art. 21(1).

[91] Id. art. 21(2).  The management and functioning of shelter centers are regulated by articles 22–28 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[92] Id. art. 29(1).

[93] Id. art. 29(2).  The management and functioning of points of contact and information are regulated by articles 30–34 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[94] Id. art. 35 (translation by author).  The management and functioning of mobile spaces are regulated by articles 36–41 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[95] Id. art. 42 (translation by author).  The management and functioning of the replacement programs are regulated by articles 43–49 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[96] Id. art. 50(1).

[97] Id. art. 50(2).  The management and functioning of the needle exchange programs are regulated by articles 51–57 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[98] Id. art. 58.  The management and functioning of the street teams are regulated by articles 59–64 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.

[99] Id. art. 65.  The management and functioning of the programs for supervised use are regulated by articles 66–72, 74 of Decree-Law No. 183/2001.