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United Kingdom: Sentences for Terrorism-Related Offenses May Be Lengthened

With almost half a century of legislative experience, the United Kingdom is renowned for its robust anti-terrorism laws. The operation of these laws is reviewed on an annual basis by the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation. (The Independent Reviewer’s Role, INDEPENDENT REVIEWER OF TERRORISM LEGISLATION (last visited Sept. 6, 2017).) In a recent interview with […]

United Arab Emirates: Good Samaritan Pays Blood Money to Save Young Men from Execution

(June 15, 2017) An appeals court in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, issued a decision on May 25, 2017, absolving ten young Indian men from Punjab of the murder of a Pakistani fellow worker. The men were pardoned after a Dubai-based businessman paid blood money to the victim’s father.  (Anju Agnihotri Chaba, Back from Death […]

Sweden: Man Sentenced to Prison for Soliciting Funding of Terrorist Organizations

(Feb. 28, 2017) On February 23, 2017, Malmö District Court sentenced a Swedish national to six months’ imprisonment for having “enticed funding” for the terrorist organizations Jabhat al-Nusra and the Islamic State (IS). (Press Release, Fängelse för uppmaningar på Facebook om att finansiera terroristbrott [Prison for Enticement, on Facebook, to Fund Terrorist Crimes], Malmö tingsrätt […]

Saudi Arabia: Journalist Sentenced to Seven Years of Imprisonment

(Feb. 7, 2017) On January 26, 2017, a Saudi journalist was sentenced to seven years in prison after a Saudi Arabian court convicted him of committing crimes against the national security of the state.  (Saudi Writer Jailed for Seven Years, KUWAIT TIMES (Jan. 26, 2017).)  The Criminal Court of Riyadh, which is a specialized court […]

Malaysia: Court Decision on Review of Pardon Petitions

(Jan. 25, 2017) On January 18, 2017, the Malaysian Court of Appeal ruled that the question of whether or not a rejection of a petition for a royal pardon can be appealed should be considered by a higher court. Anwar Ibrahim, a currently imprisoned opposition leader, can now petition the Federal Court to determine if […]

Lebanon: First Step to Repeal Provision Favorable to Rapists and Perpetrators of Lewd Acts

(Dec. 21, 2016) A person who commits certain crimes defined by law, rape; lewd acts by threat, violence, or against minors; and other similar crimes may avoid punishment under a controversial provision of the Penal Code of Lebanon. (Lebanese Penal Code, Legislative Decree No. 340 of 1943, arts. 503-510, 514-521, & 522, United Nations Office […]

New Zealand: Two Men Sentenced for Possession of ISIS Material

(June 24, 2016) On June 23, 2016, in two separate cases, New Zealand’s Auckland District Court sentenced two men for offenses that included possession of videos produced by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also referred to as ISIS).  The cases were the first of this kind in the country.  The charges against the […]

United Nations: Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals Arrests French Journalist

(Apr. 6, 2016) The United Nations Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT) on March 24, 2016, arrested French journalist Florence Hartmann, based on a warrant issued in November 2011 by the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY).  (Press Release, MICT, Mechanism Arrests Contempt Convict (Mar. 24, 2016); Jacqueline Jones, […]

Maldives: Draft Law Would Criminalize Defamation

(Mar. 29, 2016) On March 22, 2016, the government of the Maldives submitted draft legislation to the parliament that would criminalize defamation. Even before the formal introduction of the draft law, the political opposition and journalists protested the proposal as a restriction on freedom of speech.  The Bill on Defamation and Freedom of Speech, written […]

Brazil: Federal Supreme Court Changes Its Understanding of Enforcement of Sentences

(Mar. 11, 2016) On February 17, 2016, the Brazilian Federal Supreme Court (Supremo Tribunal Federal) ruled that requiring a defendant to start serving a sentence after an intermediate appellate court’s confirmation of a criminal conviction does not offend the constitutional principle of the defendant’s presumption of innocence. Minister Teori Zavascki, who wrote the opinion, held that an intermediate appellate […]