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Kenya: Government Requires Deletion of Video from Google’s Website

(Mar. 1, 2016) On February 23, 2016, Kenya’s Film Classification Board (KFCB) ordered Google to take a video off its website within one week, because the video depicted nudity and sexual situations between individuals of the same gender. (Stellar Murumba, Kenyan Film Board Gives Google One Week to Pull Down Gay Song Video, BUSINESS DAILY […]

Russian Federation: State Control of Internet Proposed

(Mar. 1, 2016) On February 11, 2016, the Russian media reported that the Ministry of Communications had drafted proposed legislation on state control of Internet traffic in the territory of the Russian Federation. While the text of the legislation has not been published, the Russian newspaper that obtained the explanatory note for the proposal stated […]

Japan: New Instructions Allow Women to Remarry 100 Days After Divorce

(Feb. 26, 2016) Currently, article 733 of Japan’s Civil Code states that women cannot remarry until six months after a divorce. (Civil Code (Part IV and Part V) (tentative translation), Act No. 89 of 1896, art. 733, Japanese Law Translation website.) This provision aims to avoid uncertainty regarding the identity of the legally presumed father […]

Malawi: Parliament to Consider Access to Information Bill

(Feb. 23, 2016) On February 12, 2016, the Malawi Cabinet approved the Access to Information Bill, which seeks to accord access to public information in the custody of various private and public institutions.  (MISA Malawi Commends Malawi for Approving the Access to Information Bill, STAR AFRICA.COM (Feb. 18, 2016).)  The legislation was sent to the 193-member […]

Turkey: Legislation Adopted on Part-Time Work Option for Working Mothers

(Feb. 19, 2016) Legislation amending Turkey’s labor laws, adopted by the Grand National Assembly (the Turkish parliament), creates flexible work options. Under the new provisions, “working mothers with young children will be able to work part-time” by permitting “rented workers” (i.e., contract workers), whose employment contracts will end when the mothers go back to work, […]

Netherlands: List of Safe Countries of Origin for Asylum Purposes Expanded

(Feb. 12, 2016) On February 9, 2016, the State Secretary for Security and Justice of the Netherlands, Klaas Dijkhoff, announced that he will add six jurisdictions to the country’s list of safe countries of origin; persons from countries on this list are deemed presumptively ineligible for asylum. The new additions are Ghana, India, Jamaica, Morocco, Mongolia, and Senegal, although Morocco […]

EHCR/Hungary: Mass Surveillance Activities by Police Force Violate the Right to Privacy, Home and Correspondence

(Feb. 9, 2016) On January 2016, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) delivered a judgment in the case of Szabo and Vissy v. Hungary. The ECHR held that broad secret surveillance activities that had been conducted by the Hungarian Anti-Terrorism Task Force, which was established within the police force on the basis of the […]

Germany: Proposed Tightening of Asylum Rules

(Feb. 8, 2016) On February 3, 2016, the German government agreed on a set of stricter asylum measures (“Asylum Package II”). The Asylum Package II would accelerate the asylum application process; suspend family reunification for refugees with subsidiary protection status for a period of two years; decrease asylees’ monthly cash benefits; facilitate deportation; establish a […]

Poland: Controversial Proposals and Measures on Surveillance Law, Constitutional Tribunal, and Media Law

(Feb. 3, 2016) Poland’s government is planning legal changes that would increase the surveillance over the country’s citizens. The new provisions, proposed by the ruling Law and Justice Party, would increase the government’s access to digital data while reducing restrictions on the use of surveillance by the police. (Dominic Yobbi, Thousands March in Poland to […]