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Luxembourg: Three Referendum Questions Voted Down

(July 7, 2015) On June 7, 2015, voters in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg were called to vote by referendum on three questions related to the drafting of a new Constitution: (1) the optional right to vote for Luxembourgers from 16 years of age, (2) the optional right to vote for non-Luxembourg residents, provided that […]

France: Constitutional Court Rules on Car-Hiring Services Legislation

(June 30, 2015) There have been some important recent developments on the legal status of chauffeured vehicles for hire in France. Probably the most significant came in the form of a constitutional challenge to Law No. 2014-1104 of October 1, 2014, on Taxis and Chauffeured Transport Vehicles, commonly called the Loi Thévenoud (Thévenoud Law), the […]

Chad: New Governmental Measures Following Two Suicide Bombings

(June 25, 2015) On June 19, 2015, Prime Minister Kalzeubet Payimi Deubet of Chad announced that his government was imposing new measures to enhance security in the country, notably the issuance of new identity cards and passports and the prohibition of activities along the Chari River from Gassi to Karkandjéri, including clothes washing. Police forces […]

France: Constitutional Court Confirms Legal Obligation to Vaccinate Children

(June 23, 2015) On March 20, 2015, the Conseil constitutionnel (Constitutional Council) found that the French legal requirement for parents to have their children vaccinated against diphtheria, tetanus, and poliomyelitis was constitutionally valid. (Conseil Constitutionnel (Constitutional Council), Decision No. 2015-458 QPC, Epoux L. (Mar. 20, 2015), Conseil Constitutionnel website.) The Conseil constitutionnel is the French […]

European Court of Human Rights; France: Ruling on French Case of Discontinuation of Treatment

(June 17, 2015) On June 5, 2015, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), in the case of Lambert and Others v. France, held by a majority opinion that the application of the French Conseil d’État decision of June 24, 2014, allowing the discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment to Vincent Lambert, would […]

France: Comedian Condemned for Hate Speech and Condoning Terrorism

(Mar. 26, 2015) The controversial French comedian Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, known simply as Dieudonné, has been the subject of a recent prosecution for a statement condoning terrorism and of several prosecutions involving hate speech. These cases were principally governed by the Law of July 29, 1881, on Freedom of the Press, which is considered one […]

France: Germanwings Crash Being Investigated as Homicide

(Mar. 26, 2015) The March 25, 2015, crash of a Germanwings flight in the French Alps is being investigated as a potential involuntary homicide. (Crash de l’A320: Hollande, Merkel et Rajoy se recueillent sur les lieux du drame [A320 Crash: Hollande, Merkel and Rajoy Gather to Mourn on the Location of the Disaster], LE POINT […]

France: Six French Citizens Prohibited from Leaving Under New Anti-Terrorism Law

(Feb. 26, 2015) A key provision of a new antiterrorism law was recently applied for the first time in France, when authorities confiscated the passports of six would-be jihadist fighters who were believed to be about to leave for Syria. (Six djihadistes français sur le depart privés de passeports [Passports Taken Away from Six Jihadists […]

France: Law on Public Exposure to Electromagnetic Waves Adopted

(Feb. 5, 2015) The French parliament recently adopted a law regulating public exposure to electromagnetic waves. (Proposition de loi relative à la sobriété, à la transparence, à l’information et à la concertation en matière d’exposition aux ondes électromagnétiques, Texte définitif [Proposed Law on Sobriety, Transparency, Information and Consultation on Exposure to Electromagnetic Waves, Final Text], […]

France: Law on Administrative Simplification Implemented

(Dec. 2, 2014) France has recently implemented a law reversing the presumption of denial that had applied in most dealings between the French administration and the public. Previously, the general rule was that a governmental agency was deemed to have refused a request if the agency had not responded within two months. (Mathilde Damgé, Administration: […]