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Kuwait: New Counter-Terrorism Legislation Proposed

(Jan. 7, 2015)

Faisal al-Douisan, a member of the Kuwaiti Parliament, recently introduced legislation on criminalizing terrorism. The draft proposal defines terrorism as any use of force, violence, or threat aimed at disturbing the public order or exposing the safety or security of society to danger; inciting sectarian strife; or endangering centers of worship, religious gatherings, or public properties or occupying or seizing such properties, even temporarily. (Faisal al-Douisan Introduces a Law Criminalizing Terrorism and Its Financing, ALMUSTAGBAL.COM (Dec. 16, 2014) (in Arabic).).

In November 2006, Kuwait had acknowledged that it had not yet enacted “a law expressly devoted to terrorism.” (United Nations Security Council, “Enclosure: Fifth Supplementary Response of the State of Kuwait to Questions Raised by the Security Council Committee Established Pursuant to Resolution 1373 (2001) Concerning Counter-Terrorism,” Letter Dated 16 November 2006 from the Chairman of the Security Council Committee Established Pursuant to Resolution 1373 (2001) Concerning Counter-Terrorism, Addressed to the President of the Security Council (Nov. 17, 2006), S/2006/093, at 9.) A review of the criminal laws of Kuwait available on the government’s website appears to suggest that any such law is still lacking. (1 Consolidated Code of Kuwait, Criminal and Complementary Laws (last visited Dec. 19, 2014) (in Arabic).)