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Gracia Santiago performs in Stevens Park, Finney County, Kansas, 1999, detail from poster. Photo courtesy of the Finney County Convention and Tourist Bureau.
Gracia Santiago performs in Stevens Park, Finney County, Kansas, 1999, detail from poster. Photo courtesy of the Finney County Convention and Tourist Bureau.

Explore Your Community: A Community Heritage Poster for the Classroom

World Wide Web Resources for Cultural Heritage Research Projects

Explore Your Community Poster

Listed here are some online resources that will assist you in doing cultural research in your community, arranged according to the kinds of information they provide.

Collecting Cultural Heritage Materials

Preserving Cultural Heritage Materials

Cultural Heritage Curriculum Materials

Organizations

In addition to the American Folklife Center, the following national organizations have resources to help educators develop folklife education and folklife fieldwork projects with young people:

There are also numerous state and local arts agencies and folklife-in-education initiatives across the country, many of which are listed in the Folklife Sourcebook database. (American Folklife Center, Library of Congress)

Examples of School-Based Cultural Heritage Projects

Arizona Heritage Project External link
The Arizona Heritage Project provides funding, resources, and training to allow high schools (grades 9 and higher) to develop opportunities for teachers and students to conduct oral histories with local residents.
Bland County History Archive External link
Developed and maintained by students at Rocky Gap High School, in Rocky Gap, Virginia, the Bland County History Archives contain 80 cemetery catalogs, 330 oral history interviews (both tapes and transcripts), and 700 scanned photographs, plus maps and other artifacts. The Archives began in 1993 as an optional project in junior-year American history classes, with the goal of preserving the unique stories of the area's Appalachian residents. Several years later, educators took advantage of the opportunity to integrate computer technology with the history curriculum, creating a local history and technology class specifically to manage and organize the Archives's Web site. The online content of the Archives continues to grow, and in 1996 the site won "Best School Resource Site in Virginia" from the Virginia Society for Technology in Education.
Llano Grande Center for Research and Development External link
Much of the history of South Texas is missing from conventional textbooks, lying instead in oral folk tradition. As a result, students and staff of the Llano Grande Center for Research and Development, housed at Edcouch-Elsa High School, are conducting and publishing interviews with residents of this Rio Grande Valley border community. Equipped with a cassette tape recorder and a still camera, students conduct the interviews and later transcribe and edit them for publication in the Llano Grande Journal, available in hard copy and online, in both English and Spanish. Many area students now read the journal's oral histories as literature assignments in their language arts classes.
Montana Heritage Project External link
Montana's state-wide project supports cultural heritage education in its schools. The Web site provides curriculum materials, examples of past projects, and information about publications and events related to the project.

 

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   September 30, 2014
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