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Presidential pardon for Isaac Cadwell, 1819.

Location: Sheldon Museum Research Center (Middlebury, Vt.) External Link

Background: Postmaster, of Bristol, Vt., from 1805-1816. In 1819 he was arrested, tried, and imprisoned for failure to keep proper accounts resulting in debt to the U.S. Government. He was pardoned in Oct., 1819 by President James Monroe.

Contents: Pardon, signed by President James Monroe and Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, for Isaac Cadwell, who had been jailed for debt to the U.S. Government.


Ship Wellfleet

Logbook of the ship Wellfleet kept by Capt. Henry S. Rich, 1862-1863.

Location: Penobscot Marine Museum, Searsport, Me. External Link

Background: Senator Weber was built in Boston in 1853 as the ship Wellfleet. Under captain Henry S. Rich, of Bucksport, Me., she sailed for Enoch Train's Boston Liverpool Line of packets in 1854, then transferred to the Regular Line, sailing in the Boston-New Orleans cotton packet trade. In the summer of 1856, two groups of Mormon immigrants sailed to America aboard the "Wellfleet." The Civil War idled ships like the "Wellfleet" and she was sold to Hamburg, Germany in 1863. There she was renamed "Senator Weber" and flew the flag of Hamburg, which then had its own merchant fleet. In 1866, following Prussia's victory over Austria, Hamburg was incorporated into the North German Confederation and the "Senator Weber" was sold to the Liverpool based Andrew Gibson and Co. During this period, the "Senator Weber" was the first ship on which Edward John Smith, future captain of the "Titanic," served. By 1885, the ship was owned by Axel Petterson and sailing out of Helsingberg, Sweden under the command of Captain J. W. Wenck. In March 1891, the "Senator Weber," still under the command of Captain Wenck, was caught in a heavy gale off the English coast and sank with the loss of fourteen men.

Contents: Logbook (1862-1863) of the Wellfleet kept by American captain, Henry S. Rich, of Bucksport, Me.


Commercial aviation

Newman Louisiana aviation collection, 1916-1945.

Location: University of New Orleans, Earl K. Long Library, La. External Link

Background: Earl Frederick Newman was born on May 5, 1901, in Kanawha, Iowa. A graduate of the University of Missouri at Columbia (Bachelor of Journalism, 1924), Newman found employment in newspaper work in Texas and Louisiana. In 1928 he became publicity director for Menefee Airways (New Orleans), at which time he learned to fly under the direction of James Wedell. From May 1928 to about March 21, 1931, he was employed by the Wedell-Williams Air Service, Inc. (New Orleans) as a publicist, flying instructor, and aircraft salesman. From April 1931 until about 1937, he was employed as a salesman by the Aerotopograph Corporation of America (later absorbed by Fairchild Aerial Surveys, Inc.), which trained him in the methods of aerial photogrammetry. During this period he worked on map compilations for the U.S. Geological Survey (December 1, 1933 to July 15, 1934). Newman also worked briefly for Eastern Air Lines during the mid 1930s. His work in aviation ended shortly thereafter when he went to work for the Marchant Calculating Machine Company. He died on Oct. 27, 1966, in Baton Rouge, La. Newman's work for the Wedell-Williams Air Service and the Aerotopograph Corporation of America was centered at New Orleans with some activity in other areas of Louisiana and neighboring states. The collection is especially interesting because of the picture it conveys of commercial aviation in Louisiana during the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Contents: Records and memorabilia of aviation in Louisiana, with much material on the Wedell-Williams Air Service, Inc., of Patterson and New Orleans, La. The collection consists mainly of correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, aircraft catalogs, business records, and miscellany.


Pioneer Square, Seattle, Wash., 1884

Robert Roblee collection of William N. Bell family materials, ca. 1850s-1910.

Location: Museum of History & Industry, Sophie Frye Bass Library (Seattle, Wash.) External Link

Background: William Nathaniel Bell (1817-1887) and his wife, Sarah Ann (Peter) Bell (1819-1856) arrived at Alki Beach in present-day West Seattle with the Denny party and other pioneers on the schooner Exact in 1851. The Bells, settling north of the future downtown area in what would become known as "Belltown," helped to establish the new "Town of Seattle." Sarah Ann Bell was seriously ill when Indians attacked Seattle on 26 Jan. 1856 in the "Battle of Seattle." Bell decided to move his ailing wife and his children to California. Though Sarah died in California that same year, Bell did not return to Seattle until 1870. He sold some of his now-valuable real estate, built the Bellevue Hotel at the corner of First Avenue and Battery Street, and engaged in other businesses, including developing Belltown.

Contents: Legal and business documents, correspondence, and ephemera related to the Seattle pioneer Bell family, together with photographs of early Seattle. The collection includes photographs of early Seattle; a number of land deeds and plat maps, particularly pertaining to lands owned by the Bell, Denny, and Boren families, including the original plat of Belltown, and the land deed transferring property from Carson Boren to William Bell for the residence on the site of the Hoge Building. The collection also includes tax statements and receipts and other legal documents; ephemera, including a number of calling cards and invitations collected by the Bell family; materials on the Bellevue Hotel (built by William Bell in 1890) and on President Harrison's visit to Seattle in 1891; and a biography of William N. Bell and a family genealogy, written by Bell's daughter Mary Virginia Bell Hall.


Billy Shelper

Home Sweet Home Mission papers, 1899-2009.

Location: McLean County Museum of History (Bloomington, Ill.) External Link

Background: Candy maker Billy Shelper, 1872-1952, founded the Home Sweet Home City Rescue Mission in 1917 after attending a Billy Sunday revival meeting at the Circuit Court Room in the McLean County Courthouse. The first mission building opened at 233 E. Front St in Bloomington, Ill., coincidentally the site of his birth. The mission buildings were forced to relocate several times during its history; a site on Mission Drive was the victim of an arson fire. The Mission moved and is now located at 303 E. Oakland in Bloomington, Ill., with the name Home Sweet Home Ministries.

Contents: Materials relating to Billy Shelper, such as correspondence, devotional poems, his public presentations, newspaper clippings, and pre-ministry life.


Winton Weydemeyer

Winton Weydemeyer papers, 1908-1992.

Location: University of Montana--Missoula, Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library, K . Ross Toole Archives External Link

Background: Winton W. Weydemeyer was born 19 March 1903 in Cass City, Michigan, to Harry and Margaret Weydemeyer. He was raised in Fortine, Montana, attended Lincoln County High School, and graduated with honors from Montana State University in Bozeman. He ranched near Fortine, but is best known for his many public service activities that ranged from agriculture to bird study and conservation. He served for twenty years as Master of the Montana State Grange, eighteen years as an officer of the National Grange, and helped organize three state-wide citizen conservation organizations. As a state senator in the 1951 and 1953 legislative sessions, he established conservation education in the state's public schools. He served on many governmental and educational committees, commissions, boards and councils, and, for sixteen years, was a governor's appointee to the Montana Water Pollution Council. He received both national and state awards for his considerable service activities. Winton Weydemeyer was a lifelong student of ornithology and contributed more than 150 articles and notes to professional journals. The first article appeared in 1923 and he contributed his last published note in 1992. He also published three books: The Bird Life of Lake Bowdoin, Montana; A Grange Master's America- In Defense of Freedom; and Picture Taking in Glacier Park. His published works and bird study records reflect the meticulous attention to detail that directed his approach to science. Weydemeyer died 4 February 1993.

Contents: This collection consists of Winton Weydemeyer's bird study records including annual bird counts, Montana bird species records, Montana bird lists, migration and nesting records, and bird song notes. A series of correspondence contains communications with the University of Montana, the Bureau of Biological Survey, and fellow birders.


Richard Stotz

Richard Stotz digital photographs, 1942-1946.

Location: Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center External Link

Background: Resident of Fremont, Ohio; served as combat photographer with the 5th Marine Division in the Pacific campaign and Japan during World War II and immediately afterwards; owner of photography studios in Fremont and Clyde, Ohio.

Contents: Digital scans (ca. 1200 photographs on 2 disks) of World War II photographs taken by combat photographer Richard Stotz; together with photocopies of miscellaneous paperwork pertaining to Stotz's service record with the U.S. Marine Corps. Places represented include Camp Pendleton, several Hawaiian Islands, and 20th Century Fox Studios located in Hollywood, Calif., where he received a portion of his training. Perhaps most important are the photographs taken during the invasion of Iwo Jima and the Occupation of Japan, showing images of Stotz's comrades, Japanese prisoners, downed military airplanes, and combat operations. Also includes photographs of Nagasaki and Sasebo, Japan between 1945 and 1946 which show the destruction caused by the atomic bombs, Japanese civilians, and a portion of the rebuilding process. The images were taken by Stotz and his fellow Marine combat photographers.


Booker T. Washington's visit to Southern University, 1915

Photograph of Booker T. Washington's visit to Southern University, 1915.

Location: Southern University and A&M College External Link

Contents: Photograph of Booker T. Washington and other dignitaries visiting the campus of Southern University. Other persons represented include Robert Russa Moton and Joseph Samuel Clark, president of Southern University.

Part of a recent outreach initiative to HBCU institutions in the United States.


Portrait of John Sloan

John Sloan manuscript collection, 1871-1997.

Location: Delaware Art Museum, Helen Farr Sloan Library & Archives (Wilmington, Del.) External Link

Background: Illustrator, painter, etcher, teacher, writer, lithographer; lived in New York City and Santa Fe, N.M.

Contents: Collection contains catalog records, consignment books, financial and legal records, clipping files, photographs of paintings and drawings, published illustrations, correspondence with artist friends and others, photographs, published matter about Sloan and related artists, and organizational matter. Printed Matter (Series VII) includes catalogs and materials concerning The Eight. Other persons and entities represented include Dolly Sloan, Helen Farr Sloan, Will Shuster, John Butler Yeats, Robert Henri, Ashcan School, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Society of Independent Artists, Hudson Guild, and the Armory Show. (John Sloan portrait: drypoint by George Constant, undated)


Sketch of Cornwall, Connecticut, 1835

George Whitefield papers, ca. 1826.

Location: Litchfield Historical Society (Litchfield, Conn.) External Link

Background: George Whitefield (b. ca. 1814) was a Chippewa student at the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Conn. His Indian name was Catitugegwonhale.

Contents: Letter, calligraphy exercises, and drawings. Includes a letter from Whitefield to Rev. Amos Bassett complaining that he has been harassed and wants to go back to school in Mackinaw, and two drawings, one of two soldiers fencing, and the other a view of the Cornwall Valley. (Sketch of Cornwall, Conn., 1835, by John Warner Barber, shows the buildings used by the Foreign Mission School, to the right of the church at center.)


Cadet Lewie G. Merritt, Class of 1917

Lewie G. Merritt papers, 1917-1959.

Location: The Citadel Archives & Museum (Charleston, S.C.) External Link

Background: Marine Corps officer, Citadel graduate, 1917, first American shot down in European Theater in the Libyan desert during World War II and one of the first aviators to use dive bombing.

Contents: Photographs of his Citadel and USMC career; certificates; biographical material; newspaper clippings; and memorandums concering strategic bombing survey of Guam.


Summer on Martha's Vineyard

C. G. Hine albums and publications, circa 1873-1931.

Location: Martha's Vineyard Museum (Edgartown, Mass.) External Link

Background: Charles Gilbert Hine, 1859-1931, known as C. G. Hine, was a publisher and editor of insurance periodicals, an author of local history and an amateur photographer. He resided in the tri-state area and on the island of Martha's Vineyard.

Contents: This collection contains photograph albums and publications created by C. G. (Charles Gilbert) Hine between 1884 and 1928. The albums primarily pertain to the island of Martha's Vineyard, though other geographic locales and topics of interest are also featured. The works combine Hine's passion for photography with an interest in amateur bookbinding. This image from C. G. Hine's Caper Club album portrays the romantic adventure of a summer on Martha's Vineyard. It depicts a pair of young ladies on the beach with hair and skirts blowing in the breeze. The album is in the archives of the Martha's Vineyard Museum. Photo courtesy of Martha's Vineyard Museum.

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   June 20, 2013
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