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The South Asian Literary Recordings Project

Kedarnath Singh, 1934-


Image of Kedarnath Singh, 1934- (photo credit: Gaurav Sharma)

Select page numbers to listen or LCCN to display the bibliographic record.


  1. Abhi bilakula abhi.
    Samskarana 1. Nai Dilli : Pravina Prakasana, 1996
    (LCCN: 96902698)
  2. Zamina paka rahi hai.
    4. samskarana. Nayi Dilli : Prakasana Samsthana, 2000.
    (LCCN: 80902037. LC has different edition)

    • "Surya"
      Realmedia excerpt: p. 7-8
      MP3 excerpt: p. 7-8
    • "Eka prema-kavita ko parhakara"
      Realmedia excerpt: p. 52-54
      MP3 excerpt: p. 52-54
    • "Adhi rata"
      Realmedia excerpt: p. 55
      MP3 excerpt: p. 55
    • "Dhupa mem ghore para bahasa"
      Realmedia excerpt: p. 89-91
      MP3 excerpt: p. 89-91
    • "Jo eka stri ko janata hai"
      Realmedia excerpt: p. 61-64
      MP3 excerpt: p. 61-64

  3. Yaham se dekho. 3 avrtti. Nayi Dilli : Radhakrshna Prakasana, 1995.
    (LCCN: 83903757. LC has different edition)
  4. Akala mem sarasa : kavitaem, 1983-87.
    2. samskarana. Nayi Dilli : Rajakamala Prakasana, 1990.
    (LCCN: 88902375. LC has different edition)

  5. Uttara Kabira aura anya kavitaem.
    2. samskarana. Nai Dilli : Rajakamala Prakasana, 1999.
    (LC has not acquired this title)

  6. Bagha.
    1. samskarana. Nai Dilli : Bharatiya Jnanapitha, 1996.
    (LCCN: 96905084)

Kedarnath Singh, born in 1934, is a noted Hindi poet of the modernist trend. He is appreciated mainly for the lyrical quality of his poems, perfectly in tune with his sensitive treatment of the multi-dimensional relationship between man and nature. His poems, marked by clarity and compassion, touch up on issues confronting his times. Although excessive use of imagery and symbolism filled his early poems, his poetry seems to have evolved over time, transforming itself in new directions. The general tendency in his poetry is that of capturing moods rather than being descriptive. He is known for his economy of words, never overstating his case.

He has retired as professor in the School of Indian Languages, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. He has edited an anthology of Hindi poetry after 1960 for the Sahitya Akademi and has translated into Hindi the poetry of Brecht, Baudelaire, and Rilke.

Akala mem sarasa received the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1989. He has also received the Hindi Akademi Award and the much coveted "Kumaran Asan" (Kerala) Award.

The Library of Congress has nine of his works and two on him.

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October 6, 2010
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