Library of Congress

Program for Cooperative Cataloging

The Library of Congress > Cataloging, Acquisitions > PCC > NACO > NACO Funnels > Frequently Asked Questions
  1. What is a funnel project?
  2. What are the differences between institutional NACO participation and funnel participation?
  3. Who can start a funnel project?
  4. What are the requirements to become a NACO funnel coordinator?
  5. What are the costs involved in implementing/coordinating a funnel project?
  6. What support does the PCC provide to funnel projects?
  7. What training options are available to begin a funnel project?
  8. Do all NACO funnel members have to belong to OCLC?
  9. What mechanism is available for non-OCLC funnel member libraries to contribute records?
  10. How can my institution join an existing funnel?
  11. May an individual cataloger join an existing funnel?
  12. What are the options if my institution withdraws from a funnel but wishes to continue NACO participation?
  13. What reports does LC provide to NACO libraries?
  1. What is a funnel project?
    A funnel project is a group of libraries (or catalogers from various libraries) that have joined together to contribute authority records to the LC/NACO Authority File. Funnel participants usually work in the same subject area, such as the NACO Music Project or Art NACO, or they may be regionally based, like the North Dakota Funnel or the Vermont Project. Funnel projects are an efficient means of contribution, where one person or institution coordinates the project. There may be members at all levels of expertise; however, LC deals solely with the coordinator.

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  2. What are the differences between institutional NACO participation and funnel participation?
    Individual institutional NACO partners typically have a potential to contribute a substantial number of records per year and often include the general and branch library cataloging staffs of an institution. Funnels generally consist of smaller libraries who will contribute at a more modest level as some libraries may consist of only one or two catalogers.
    Some funnels may be composed of individuals working in a particular language or subject speciality within larger institutions. These parent institutions may or may not be PCC participants. These catalogers have found a community of colleagues beyond the walls of their own institutions in professional organizations or in neighboring libraries and it makes sense to form a coordinated project to receive training and to have their NACO records reviewed by a specialist in a specific language, topic, or format. An important difference between institutional NACO vs. NACO funnel participation is that the director of an institutional NACO partner has a vote in the annual elections of the PCC, funnel participants are represented by the coordinator in the PCC elections. See also the chart comparing types of NACO membership.

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  3. Who can start a funnel project?
    Anyone who has the institutional support to organize, train, and coordinate a group of libraries with common interests to contribute name authority records via a utility (generally OCLC).

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  4. What are the requirements to become a NACO funnel project coordinator?
    The requirements are that:
    1. the coordinator must first be an independent NACO contributor;
    2. the coordinator will provide training for its members, although other options are possible;
    3. the coordinator will review the work of the funnel members;
    4. the coordinator will disseminate all LC documentation to the funnel members.

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  5. What are the costs involved in implementing/coordinating a funnel project?
    The inherent costs are the time and effort required to organize and provide review of name authority records for the funnel members. In some cases members do not have access to OCLC and the coordinator agrees to input name authorities for members (not highly recommended, but sometimes necessary). NACO funnel costs include the time and resources to reproduce and mail documentation to the funnel members on a timely basis, including updates of the LCRIs or the DCM Z1 "yellow pages" supplement to the MARC 21 authority format.

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  6. What support does the PCC provide to funnel projects?
    The PCC Secretariat will work with a coordinator to help organize NACO training. NACO funnel members will need to secure NACO authorizations, etc. (cf. Guidelines for beginning a funnel project) and the Secretariat is available to help with this process. LC will supply a free set of documentation to the trainer (e.g., LCRIs, MARC 21 Authority Format) and will send subsequent updates for dissemination to the funnel. LC will assign a liaison to act as a resource person for the coordinator to answer cataloging questions, interpretation of the LCRIs, etc.

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  7. What training options are available to begin a funnel project?
    NACO training can be provided to the coordinator at LC or at that person's institution under the same conditions as regular NACO participation. There are various options for organizing a training of funnel members in a central location as was done for the Hebraica Funnel project.

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  8. Do all funnel members have to belong to OCLC?
    No, it is not strictly necessary to belong to OCLC in order to participate in a NACO funnel if the coordinator of that funnel is willing to provide the necessary support for its members.
  9. What mechanism is available for non-OCLC funnel member libraries to contribute records?
    Funnel Coordinators can input records for the non-OCLC funnel member libraries. In this case, the funnel member library’s MARC 21 code will appear in the 040 field subfield $a for the original cataloging agency, and the funnel coordinator library’s MARC 21 code will appear in subfield $c as the transcribing agency. This practice is based on the MARC 21 Format for Authority Data’s defined use of the 040 field and is allowed for use by OCLC in support of the PCC’s NACO funnel membership.

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  10. How can my institution join an existing funnel?
    Contact the funnel coordinators listed in the Directory of funnel projects and speak with the coordinator of the funnel you want to join to learn what options are available.

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  11. May an individual cataloger join an existing funnel?
    The PCC does not encourage individual cataloger participation in any of its programs without institutional support; however, funnels can often provide feedback, review, and expert consultation to catalogers in specialized areas more expeditiously than other mechanisms. Catalogers who wish to join a specific funnel should discuss this option with their institutions and the funnel coordinator (see Directory of funnel projects).

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  12. What are the options if my institution withdraws from a funnel but wishes to continue NACO participation?
    In order to continue to participate in NACO contact the Cooperative Cataloging Team Leader, Anthony Franks or by phone at 202.707.2822 and communicate your intentions to him. You will be required to:
    1. Submit a completed NACO application available on the NACO home page.
    2. Apply to OCLC or RLG for NACO authorization if you do not already have one.
    3. If all catalogers in your institution have already been trained and are independent for NACO contribution there is no need for retraining; LC will review a sample of contributed records to ensure that the AACR2 rules, LCRIs, MARC 21, etc. have been followed. If problems are identified during the review process, the COOP Team Leader may suggest a retraining.
    All these options should be discussed with the Coop Team Leader at the time you withdraw from the NACO funnel.

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  13. What reports does LC provide to NACO libraries?
    Statistics showing the contributions of all institutions in the PCC programs are compiled twice during the LC fiscal year. Midyear statistics cover October 1 to March 30 of the following calendar year. Annual statistics cover October 1 to September 30th of the following year. In addition, monthly NACO contributions are posted online alphabetically by MARC organization code so that libraries can monitor their own contributions throughout the year. Statistical reports are displayed online through the PCC homepage.

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